40th Alabama Infantry

bdtex

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Posting this just to get it started and hoping others have information. I have a personal interest in this Regiment. I have obtained the Regimental History from the Texas Heritage Museum at Hill College. I found this book but haven't pulled the trigger to buy it yet due to the large number of books I already have waiting to be read. :D

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AUG

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This regiment was organized in May 1862 at Mobile, and remained there till December. It then moved to Vicksburg, and took part in the operations on Deer Creek. While in that region, it was brigaded with the Thirty-seventh, and Forty-second Alabama, and Second Texas, under Gen. Moore. Four companies were placed in Fort Pemberton, and were from there transferred to Gen. Bragg's army, and fought at Chickamauga. The other companies of the Fortieth were part of the garrison of Vicksburg, suffered severely, and were there captured. The regiment was united near Mission Ridge, and took part in that battle, and at Look-out Mountain, but with light loss. Having passed the winter at Dalton, where Gen. Baker took command of the brigade, the Fortieth took part in the campaign from there to Atlanta, losing largely, especially at New Hope. When the army marched back to Tennessee, in company with the other regiments of Baker's brigade, the Fortieth was sent to Mobile, and was on garrison duty there for some months. In January 1865, the regiment proceeded with the remainder of the army to North Carolina, and shared in the operations, fighting at Bentonville with severe loss. Consolidated with the Nineteenth and Forty-sixth, the Fortieth was shortly after surrendered at Yadkin River bridge.
http://www.archives.state.al.us/referenc/alamilor/40thinf.html

Note that the companies that went to the Army of Tennessee in 1863 and fought at Chickamauga were attached to Ector's Texas Brigade as Stone's Battalion Alabama Sharpshooters. Above says four companies, below says three.

According to a post here, "on April 28th [1863], Companies A, D, and I, under command of Major T. O. Stone were ordered up the Yazoo and Sunflower Rivers upon a scouting expedition, and to do picket duty. These three companies were thus separated from the regiment and being about one hundred miles up the Sunflower River when the enemy invested Vicksburg, were cut off and did not rejoin the regiment until just a few days before the battle of Lookout Mountain...."
 

bdtex

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According to a post here, "on April 28th [1863], Companies A, D, and I, under command of Major T. O. Stone were ordered up the Yazoo and Sunflower Rivers upon a scouting expedition, and to do picket duty. These three companies were thus separated from the regiment and being about one hundred miles up the Sunflower River when the enemy invested Vicksburg, were cut off and did not rejoin the regiment until just a few days before the battle of Lookout Mountain...."

That's interesting and thanks. Hadn't seen that before. If true, one mystery to me has been solved. My ancestor was in Company I. To date,I have found no record of which Companies were detailed to and surrendered at Vicksburg and which were detailed to the AoT and fought at Chickamauga.
 

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These might be of interest:

Ann Kicker Blomquist, The 40th Alabama Infantry, Confederate States of America (Orlando FL: A.K. Blomquist, 1997);

"A History of Company B, 40th Alabama Infantry, C.S.A., from the Diary of John H. Curry," in Alabama Historical Quarterly, XVII (1955), pp. 159-222;

John Moore, "Letters from Johnson's Island Prison, 1864," ed. by William Stanley Hoole, in
Alabama Review, XII (1959), pp. 222-233;

Elbert Decatur Willett, History of Company B (originally Pickens Planters), 40th Alabama Regiment, Confederate States Army, 1862 to 1865 (Anniston AL: Norwood, 1902) [Reprint, Northport: Colonial Press, 1963];
 

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Here is a letter I came across a few years back when I was doing some research for a archeological project to locate the "Dog River Factory" south of Mobile. The regimental returns for the 40th Alabama show that during this time they were at "Camp Forney" I have come to the conclusion that the camp Thomas refers to them moving to was Camp Forney and the camp at the Dog River Factory was indeed Camp Goode. This letter was written to his sister and reads as follows.

Martha J. Wideman of Gaston Sumter Co Ala
Dog River factory, Camp Goode,
Mobile, Ala., July 18, 1862.
"Dear sister…yesterday was the first day I have drilled since I have been here. We are going to move from here two miles from Mobile. We will commence moving tomorrow. I had rather stay here for we have good houses here to stay [in] and when we leave here we will have to go in tents. There is some sickness here…there is about 40 sick in the hospital…Alexander Paterson died night before last. He requested the capt. before he died to send him home but he could not get him off…there was one of our regiment who shot two of his fingers off in order to try to get a discharge, but I think he will miss it. I do not like a soldier's life much nor do I…believe any on else does. Since we have got a new commissary we fare a good deal better in the way of provisions. We get plenty to eat we are a going to move from here tomorrow in two miles of Mobile. I am in the hospital a waten on the sick…it is hard work seten up so much, but I stand it fine…I hope I will stay in good health for it is the great blessing of God. It is through his goodness that it is so. I hear of fighting every day or two but not near here and I don't look for it.

Your Loving Brother Thomas
 

bdtex

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I haven't read it but Cush: A Civil War Memoir by Samuel H. Sprott was written by a member of the 40th Alabama.
Your first two replies in this thread and a recent visit to Soldiers Rest Cemetery in Vicksburg caused me to pull the trigger on the suggested book at Amazon. I found gravestones for members of Co. A and Co. I,40th Alabama Infantry at the Soldiers Rest Cemetery. They all died on dates that correspond with the Vicksburg Campaign too.

Edit to add: The description of the book at Amazon says that Samuel Sprott was a member of Co. A.
 
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AUG

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Your first two replies in this thread and a recent visit to Soldiers Rest Cemetery in Vicksburg caused me to pull the trigger on the suggested book at Amazon. I found gravestones for members of Co. A and Co. I,40th Alabama Infantry at the Soldiers Rest Cemetery. They all died on dates that correspond with the Vicksburg Campaign too.

Edit to add: The description of the book at Amazon says that Samuel Sprott was a member of Co. A.
Make sure ya tell us how the book was. I've added it to my wish list, sounds like a good read.
 

bdtex

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Make sure ya tell us how the book was. I've added it to my wish list, sounds like a good read.
Chomping at the bit to get to it. It is next in the stack. Thumbed through it very quickly when it came in the mail and I think I am gonna like it. Will post a review in Book & Movie Review Tent with a link to this thread in it.
 

bdtex

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I wish someone would make one of these for the Second Texas on Find A Grave, for that matter, for all the regiments. Amazing how many of these Alabamians are buried in Illinois at Rock Island.
Confederate soldiers captured at Lookout Mountain were the first prisoners shipped to Rock Island. The 40th Alabama Infantry was in that battle.
 

bdtex

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Note that the companies that went to the Army of Tennessee in 1863 and fought at Chickamauga were attached to Ector's Texas Brigade as Stone's Battalion Alabama Sharpshooters. Above says four companies, below says three.

According to a post here, "on April 28th [1863], Companies A, D, and I, under command of Major T. O. Stone were ordered up the Yazoo and Sunflower Rivers upon a scouting expedition, and to do picket duty. These three companies were thus separated from the regiment and being about one hundred miles up the Sunflower River when the enemy invested Vicksburg, were cut off and did not rejoin the regiment until just a few days before the battle of Lookout Mountain...."
@DixieRifles This is where I got the information that lead me to believe Co. I,40th Alabama Infantry may have been at Fort Pemberton.
 

bdtex

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This regiment was organized in May 1862 at Mobile, and remained there till December. It then moved to Vicksburg, and took part in the operations on Deer Creek. While in that region, it was brigaded with the Thirty-seventh, and Forty-second Alabama, and Second Texas, under Gen. Moore. Four companies were placed in Fort Pemberton, and were from there transferred to Gen. Bragg's army, and fought at Chickamauga. The other companies of the Fortieth were part of the garrison of Vicksburg, suffered severely, and were there captured.
@DixieRifles Here also.
 

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@DixieRifles This is where I got the information that lead me to believe Co. I, 40th Alabama Infantry may have been at Fort Pemberton.

That is what I used to refer as the Rolling Fork Expedition. I have a limited publication of soldier's recollection of his service in a regiment----I think it is the 44th Mississippi Regiment. He described going up the Sunflower River and I think they were trying to oppose an expedition sent out from Sherman's command out of Vicksburg. I may have a reference that tells what other regiments were sent along the Sunflower.
I need to read this booklet on the Yazoo Pass Expedition as I think it mentions this "diversion". Grant expected the Yazoo Pass Expedition would defeat Vicksburge by either (a) hitting them behind the lines or (b) it would draw troops out of the defensive position to stop the expedition so as to allow Sherman to break through.

The second reference to it being brigaded with Moore's brigade doesn't seem to be right. I know the 40th Alabama was with Moore's Brigade on Lookout Mountain but it doesn't seem to be with him at Fort Pemberton. The 37th and 42nd Alabama is with Moore's brigade in both battles. What is odd is that the 40 Mississippi was replaced by the 40 Alabama.
That needs more research.
 

bdtex

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That is what I used to refer as the Rolling Fork Expedition. I have a limited publication of soldier's recollection of his service in a regiment----I think it is the 44th Mississippi Regiment. He described going up the Sunflower River and I think they were trying to oppose an expedition sent out from Sherman's command out of Vicksburg. I may have a reference that tells what other regiments were sent along the Sunflower.
I need to read this booklet on the Yazoo Pass Expedition as I think it mentions this "diversion". Grant expected the Yazoo Pass Expedition would defeat Vicksburge by either (a) hitting them behind the lines or (b) it would draw troops out of the defensive position to stop the expedition so as to allow Sherman to break through.

The second reference to it being brigaded with Moore's brigade doesn't seem to be right. I know the 40th Alabama was with Moore's Brigade on Lookout Mountain but it doesn't seem to be with him at Fort Pemberton. The 37th and 42nd Alabama is with Moore's brigade in both battles. What is odd is that the 40 Mississippi was replaced by the 40 Alabama.
That needs more research.
All of the Unit Histories of the 40th Alabama Infantry that I have seen say that part of the 40th Alabama Infantry was trapped in Vicksburg and that 4 companies were detached before that and I know that the entire 40th was present at Lookout Mountain. So far,I have not seen anything conclusive about which 4 companies were detached and where they were before they got to Lookout Mountain. Further up in this thread are some posts about a soldier from Co. A,40th AL Inf's memoirs. I bought that book and it is next in my stack. My kin was in Co. I.
 

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http://www.archives.state.al.us/referenc/FLAGS/063.html

The first flag of the 40th Alabama Infantry was a large silk flag of unknown design. It was presented to the regiment on September 9, 1862 at Camp Marshall Austil near Mobile. The presentation was made by William Jemison and the flag was received by Colonel Augustus A. Coleman. This flag was captured at the fall of Vicksburg. While at Vicksburg the regiment received a second flag which was not captured. This flag (86.1886.1) was hidden to prevent its capture and remained with the regiment until they received a new Hardee pattern flag at Demopolis in October 1863. The Vicksburg flag was apparently retained by Colonel John H. Higley who returned to Mobile after the war. The flag was prominently displayed at several reunions. By 1904, Joseph Cady of Mobile had somehow gained possession of the flag. In a letter dated August 15, 1904, Cady claimed that the flag had been given to him by Higley. However, an earlier letter (June 12, 1903) to Judge T. W. Coleman states that the flag was kept by Higley until his death and that Cady had somehow acquired possession of it. Beginning in June 1903, Dr. Owen, Director of the Alabama Department of Archives and History, began writing Joe Cady requesting that he donate the flag to the Department. However, despite Owen's pleas and those of others, Cady refused to comply. Upon Cady's death the flag was returned to Marshall Higley (son of Colonel John H. Higley) who sent it to the Department by express on May 24, 1913.

Sources:
Curator's Object Files, Civil War Flags, Alabama Department of Archives and History.


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http://www.archives.state.al.us/referenc/FLAGS/064065.html

Flags of this pattern were manufactured in Mobile, Alabama and issued to units within the Department of Alabama, Mississippi and East Louisiana.1 This flag was apparently issued to the 40th Alabama Infantry at Dalton, Georgia in May, 1864.

In his account of the flag's history former Lt. Colonel Ezekiel S. Gulley stated that it was carried from the time it was issued until the end of the war. At the Battle of Bentonville, North Carolina, March 22-23, 1865 three flag bearers were shot down carrying the flag. Following the battle, a small group of men became separated from the rest of the regiment for several days narrowly avoiding capture on a number of occasions. To avoid losing the colors, flag bearer Hilliard O'Neal removed the flag from its staff and wrapped it around his body, wearing it underneath his clothing. In his diary, Sgt. John H. Curry of Co. B, provided additional details concerning the incident, “our flag with 40 men were cut off from our Reg. And got behind Fed. Lines and had to make their way Raleigh and return by rail. The flag-bearer tore it from the staff, took down his pants, tied it around his leg, and brought it out all ok except the staff. Several days after the battle they came into camp with it flying on a staff cut for the occasion, men shouted – cried, kissed it, hugged it – &c. such a sensation was never produced in our command before.”

Following the Battle of Bentonville, the 40th was consolidated with the 19th Alabama Infantry. The new regiment was designated as the 19th Alabama Infantry and placed in General Edmund Pettus' Brigade. Gulley asked Pettus what was to be done with the flag, to which Pettus replied that Gulley could keep the flag if he wanted to. Gulley retained the flag after the war with the intention of passing it on to his children.

From 1903-1907, Director Thomas Owen corresponded with Woodson and Bettie Gulley trying to persuade them to loan or donate the flag to the Alabama Department of Archives and History. The flag was loaned briefly in order for it to be photographed and was then returned to Woodson Gulley. On January 2, 1940, the flag was offered to the Department by Robert S. Campbell, the grandson of E. S. Gulley. The gift was acknowledged on January 9, 1940.

Sources:
Curator's Object Files, Civil War Flags, Alabama Department of Archives and History.
Curator's Files, Flag of the 37th Alabama Infantry, Auburn University, Alabama Department of Archives and History.
Curry, J. H., "A History of Company B, 40th Alabama Infantry, C.S.A." Alabama Historical Quarterly, Vol. 17, No. 3, Fall 1955.
Madaus, Howard Michael. The Battle Flags of the Confederate Army of Tennessee. Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 1976.

Flags of this pattern were manufactured by James A. Cameron and Jackson Ogden Belknap.

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bdtex

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I haven't read it but Cush: A Civil War Memoir by Samuel H. Sprott was written by a member of the 40th Alabama.
Ok. Finished it today. It confirms that Co.'s A,D and I,40th Alabama Infantry were 100 miles up the Sunflower River from Vicksburg when it was surrounded. They then became "Stone's Battalion" and were ordered up the Yazoo River. They disembarked a few miles upriver from Greenwood. They were not present at the Battle of Fort Pemberton but they heard it.
 

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