2nd Manassas 2nd Manassas

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The Iron Duke

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The accusation the Lee shuffled impatiently while Longstreet obstinately delayed his entry into the battle for nearly thirty hours has shown more durability over time, but is no more valid. This theory presupposes that Lee was weak, and therefore could be dominated. If true -and it was not- then Lee, not Longstreet, deserves criticism for allowing a subordinate to overbear him in the face of good sense and good tactics.

But the whole question is in fact moot, for Longstreet did not overbear or dominate RE Lee during the Second Battle of Manassas. The evidence shows clearly that the concerns Longstreet harbored about attacking on August 29 were valid. He shared those concerns -which changed as the day passed- with Lee, and in each instance Lee came to agree with him, though sometimes reluctantly and often only after personal inspection of the ground. At about 5 PM on August 39 Lee, based on information supplied by Longstreet, opted to postpone the attack until the morning of the 30th.

This fact explodes yet another dogged misperception about Lee and Longstreet: that Lee passively waited for Longstreet to move forward on August 30. Longstreet did not receive orders to attack until nearly 4 PM on August 30. -Return to Bull Run pages 460-461

Hennessy effectively, IMO, shoots down DS Freeman's arguments in RE Lee.
 

The Iron Duke

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One of the few remaining scenes of the Second Manassas cyclorama. Lee and Longstreet managing the battle.

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Glorybound

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Have never seen that cyclorama. Nice post, Duke. Thanx.

Lee
 
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M E Wolf

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Iron_Duke, sir;

I do remember these illustrations from my youth. I do thank you for finding them again.

Personally, I think they are much better for those youngsters like me in the day; to be more engaged in the picture and remember for a while or so, the placements of the two Armies.

Very well done sir. Much appreciated.

The illustration with General Longstreet and General Lee, the horses are quite correct for General Longstreet. His horse was a big strong black horse--believed to be an Irish Thoroughbred named "Hero."

Just some thoughts.

Respectfully submitted,
M. E. Wolf
 

The Iron Duke

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A Texan thought that the sight of all the fallen Zouaves with their fancy blue and red uniforms looked like a springtime hillside covered with wild flowers back home.

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The pitiful remnants of Duryea's Zouaves were rallied on Henry House Hill at about 1700. They numbered only 60 men of the 560 who had been in its ranks just an hour before. Nearly 300 had been lost in the brief ten minute fight with Hood's Texans, of whom 120 had been killed- the greatest loss of any Union volunteer infantry regiment in one battle in the entire war. -The Second Bull Run Campaign pages 225-226

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brass napoleon

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A Texan thought that the sight of all the fallen Zouaves with their fancy blue and red uniforms looked like a springtime hillside covered with wild flowers back home.

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The pitiful remnants of Duryea's Zouaves were rallied on Henry House Hill at about 1700. They numbered only 60 men of the 560 who had been in its ranks just an hour before. Nearly 300 had been lost in the brief ten minute fight with Hood's Texans, of whom 120 had been killed- the greatest loss of any Union volunteer infantry regiment in one battle in the entire war. -The Second Bull Run Campaign pages 225-226

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It's always seemed to me that it would be really awkward to march and fight dressed like that, not to mention the fact that it makes you a big bullseye on the battlefield. But the Zouaves sure fought hard and well wherever they went, and they played an important role in saving Pope's army at 2nd Manassas.
 

The Iron Duke

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It's always seemed to me that it would be really awkward to march and fight dressed like that, not to mention the fact that it makes you a big bullseye on the battlefield.
I find it ironic that Christians were fighting in Muslm garb.:laugh1:


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Lee had ridden forward over the dead-strewn field, before the merciful darkness had hidden any of its horrors. He had reached the most advanced artillery position just after the order to "cease firing" had been given, and from the crest of the ridge, astride Traveller, he studied the ground in front with his binoculars. Not fifteen feet from him was a silent gun.

"General," said Captain Mason of the staff, when Lee at last dropped his glasses, "here is some one who wants to speak to you."

Lee looked and saw a powder-blackened gunner, his sponge staff in his hand. Ever since he had been asked for a chew of tobacco by a raw private in western Virginia, he had been accustomed to receive all manner of complaints and requests at unexpected places from unknown members of the voluntary association known as the Army of Northern Virginia; so there was no surprise in his when he said, "Well, my man, what can I do for you?"

"Why, General," said the cannoneer in aggrieved and familiar tones, "don't you know me?"

It was Robert. -RE Lee Volume II, pages 335-336
 
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brass napoleon

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Lee looked and saw a powder-blackened gunner, his sponge staff in his hand. Ever since he had been asked for a chew of tobacco by a raw private in western Virginia, he had been accustomed to receive all manner of complaints and requests at unexpected places from unknown members of the voluntary association known as the Army of Northern Virginia; so there was no surprise in his when he said, "Well, my man, what can I do for you?"

"Why, General," said the cannoneer in aggrieved and familiar tones, "don't you know me?"

It was Robert. -RE Lee Volume II, pages 335-336
:laugh2: I remember the story about Lee's son, but I don't remember the story about the chewing tobacco. Maybe it's cause I have the abridged version of R.E. Lee (either that or I'm just plain getting OLD). Anyway, I can just see it now. "Hey pard, gotta chew?" :laugh1:

Reminds me of the story Shelby Foote told of a guy who saw President Davis on the street and told him he looked just like a postage stamp.
 

The Iron Duke

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Lieutenant Colonel Charles A Hamilton was wounded at the battle of Groveton/Brawner's Farm. He was a member of the 7th Wisconsin and the grandson of Alexander Hamilton.
 

brass napoleon

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Colonel Fletcher Webster, eldest son of Senator Daniel Webster, was killed rallying his men in a last ditch stand on Chinn Ridge. Earlier in the day he had written a letter to his wife telling her ""If a fight comes off, it will be to-day or to-morrow & will be a most dreadful & decisive one. This may be my last letter, dear love, for I shall not spare myself..."
 
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Ellsworth avenger

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Lieutenant Colonel Charles A Hamilton was wounded at the battle of Groveton/Brawner's Farm. He was a member of the 7th Wisconsin and the grandson of Alexander Hamilton.
Excellant art,I not a big fan of most contemporary cival war art but the artist does I fine job.
Good art,like poetry is in producing feeling. Thank You for the post.
 

The Iron Duke

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SDLee.jpg


Riding forward a few rods to an open, which gave a view of Jackson's field, I came in sight of Porter's battle, piling up against Jackson's right, centre, and left. At the same time an order came from General Lee for a division to be sent General Jackson. Porter's masses were in almost direct line from the point at which I stood, and in enfilade fire. It was evident that they could not stand fifteen minutes under the fire of the batteries planted at that point, while a division marching back and across the field to aid Jackson could not reach him in an hour, more time probably than he could stand under the heavy weights then bearing down upon him. Boldness was prudence! Prompt work by the wing and batteries could relieve the battle. Reinforcements might not be in time, so I called for my nearest batteries. Ready, anticipating a call, they sprang to their places and drove at speed, saw the opportunity before it could be pointed out, and went into action...Almost immediately the wounded began to drop off from Porter's ranks; the number seemed to increase with every shot; the masses began to waver, swinging back and forth, showing signs of discomfiture along the left and left centre.

In ten or fifteen minutes it crumbled into disorder and turned towards the rear...Not satisfied, they made a third effort to rally and fight the battle through, but by that time they had fallen back far enough to open the field to the fire of SD Lee's artillery battalion. As the line began to take shape, this fearful fire was added to that under which they had tried so ineffectually to fight. The combination tore the line to pieces, and as it broke the third time the charge was ordered. -From Manassas to Appomattox pages 187-188
 

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His rigid insistence on discipline, combined with the defeat he suffered in the war's first battle, rendered him highly unpopular with his men. In June, a soldier of the 13th Massachusetts had described a fall McDowell had taken from his horse. He was "slightly injured," the man wrote, "but did not seem to get much sympathy. I heard someone propose three cheers for the horse that threw him." Some men even questioned McDowell's loyalty, suggesting that the prominent hat he wore, "which looked like an esqimaux canoe on his head, wrong side up," served as a covert signal to the enemy that he was present and "all was well." Herald correspondent George Townsend called him, "the most unpopular man in America." -Return to Bull Run pages 7-8

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The Iron Duke

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Back on the battlefield, Pope, believing Porter would attack any minute, ordered a fresh attack at five o'clock by Kearny and Reno against Jackson's depleted, but undefeated left...They wore a red patch on their caps, and when they were not called the "Red Diamond Division" they were called "Phil Kearny's theives."

Facing them, AP Hill's men were desperately short of cartridges. "Good for you, boys! Give them the rocks and the bayonet," Hill encouraged. "Hold your position and I will soon have ammunition and reinforcements for you." Hill's staff filled their pockets and haversacks with cartridges for distribution while he rode to consult Jackson, reporting his men might not be able to stave off another onslaught. Jackson replied they must.

A loud crash of gunfire swept the field. "Here it comes," said Hill. "I'll expect you to beat them," Jackson called after him.

Maxcy Gregg's South Carolinians began stepping backward under the pressure. General Gregg strode along the line waving his old Revolutionary War sword, saying, "Let us die here, my men, let us die here!" -Second Manassas page 29
 

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF VIRGINIA,
Washington, D.C., July 14, 1862.

To the Officers and Soldiers of the Army of Virginia:

By special assignment of the President of the United States I have assumed the command of this army. I have spent two weeks in learning your whereabouts, your condition, and your wants, in preparing you for active operations, and in placing you in positions from which you can act promptly and to the purpose. These labors are nearly completed, and I am about to join you in the field.

Let us understand each other. I have come to you from the West, where we have always seen the backs of our enemies; from an army whose business it has been to seek the adversary and to beat him when he was found; whose policy has been attack and not defense. In but one instance has the enemy been able to place our Western armies in defensive attitude. I presume that I have been called here to pursue the same system and to lead you against the enemy. It is my purpose to do so, and that speedily. I am sure you long for an opportunity to win the distinction you are capable of achieving. That opportunity I shall endeavor to give you. Meantime I desire you to dismiss from your minds certain phrases, which I am sorry to find so much in vogue amongst you. I hear constantly of "taking strong positions and holding them," of "lines of retreat," and of "bases of supplies." Let us discard such ideas. The strongest position a soldier should desire to occupy is one from which he can most easily advance against the enemy. Let us study the probable lines of retreat of our opponents, and leave our own to take care of themselves. Let us look before us, and not behind. Success and glory are in the advance, disaster and shame lurk in the rear. Let us act on this understanding, and it is safe to predict that your banners shall be inscribed with many a glorious deed and that your names will be dear to your countrymen forever.

JNO. POPE,
Major-General, Commanding.
 
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