2nd battle of Sabine Pass, Fort Griffin Cannon, their carriages, What type were they?

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Apr 25, 2012
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#1
Hi all
I have been working on the details of Fort Griffin. I am trying to determine what type of carriage the cannon there were mounted on. They had 2 banded 32prs longs (guessing 1841 pattern, but only a guess) , 2- 24pdrs, long, and 2 Howitzers (maybe carronades??)
From all I can find, they are listed as mounted on their "Carriage". What type though I cannot find. Based upon the fort type. I do not think it was a forward pivot pin type like a Seacoast Barbette Carriage as it needed to transverse 90 degrees or very slightly greater.
A typical field carriage would have not worked as the recoil would have rolled it back into the area of its neighbor and caused mutual interference.
I think a center pivot Columbiad type may have been used, but the fort was Sand/shell over compacted sand/shell. The rail I am thinking would have just sunk deep into the earth.
Any thoughts on the matter? Does anyone by chance know??
Thanks
 
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AndyHall

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#2
Cotham's Sabine Pass does not discuss the carriages specifically, although it does go into some detail about the construction of the fort and procuring the guns for it. Center-pivot carriages seem most likely (and practical) to me. The engineers responsible for the project, Sulakowski and Kellersberger, did a good job in both the design and placement of Fort Griffin, and undoubtedly tried to make them of as high a standard as resources allowed. Timber was used extensively in sand forts of this type generally, and Fort Griffin specifically, so I would expect the gun positions themselves to be reinforced and decked over, as in this image from Charleston:

03107v.jpg
 

AndyHall

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#5
No. There is a small state park commemorating it nearby. The walking beam from U.S.S. Clifton, captured in the battle, has been conserved and is displayed there.

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#6
The western wall is still dry land, though not standing, Hurricanes, river current and father time have eroded the rest into the Sabine River. There is a concrete 1/20 scale 3d renditon of the fort there and markers to show where the ships were at.
I am still researching to find if the mass grave is still there and unlocated or if at the end of the war, if the persons were re-interned elsewhere.
The park is really quite nice there. worth the stop for sure if your in the area.
 



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