22nd Kentucky Infantry


(Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)
Joined
Jun 11, 2012
Messages
2,372
#62
Ok. I think you’ve shared that book here before- a link perhaps? I think I remember looking through it but not much mention of Champion Hill and Big Black. Am I right about that? Or am I confusing it with something else?
 
Joined
Jun 8, 2013
Messages
6,696
Location
Nebraska
#67
Wow!! Thanks, that helps me!!
Grain of salt, my friend. I have some issues with some of the numbers. I know that two members of the 22nd were killed at Champion Hill that are not listed. One died at or near the battlefield and one at Edward's Station the day of the battle. Another had a leg amputated at the thigh and died June 4 at Barber Hospital. But I know there are a variety of reasons they are not listed as killed, but the killed column should be questioned a bit. Overall I think the strength numbers are pretty accurate as one would expect.

22nd Kentucky Volunteer Infantry
Phillip Mossman, Co. K -- Killed by shell wound to the head
William Howe, Co. I -- Gun shot to the head, died at Edward's Station
Solomon Parker, Co. A -- Wounded in right thigh, died June 4 at Barber Hospital
 
Joined
Jun 8, 2013
Messages
6,696
Location
Nebraska
#69
Wow!! Well done and congratulations!!

If you don't mind, What is the disposition of a Captain Thomas of the 22nd Kentucky. He is mentioned in the Official Records as being severely burned at Champion Hill. He must have been very popular with the men. I'd like to know what ever happened with him.
Here's another account of Capt. Evan D. Thomas' injury at Champion Hill. Published in Holmes County Republican by a member of the 16th Ohio, Corp. Theodore Wolbach.

"Late in the afternoon the divisions of Carr and Osterhaus were started rapidly after the retreating Confederates, who were crowding the road and wending through the bordering fields in their mad haste to get away from their elated and victorious pursuers. Minutes were precious and could not be wasted in brushing the dust from the uniforms or washing the sweat and powder-stains from the faces. Twilight and darkness came and burning wagons and other war material, fired by the exasperated foe, gave a lurid and inspiring tint to the thrilling scene of a mighty moving mass of men pressing rapidly westward.

"Rolling on in strange confusion,
Friend and foeman, foot and horse,
Like some wild and troubled torrent
Sweeping down its mountain course."

Some of the burning wagons were filled with ammunition, causing several dangerous explosions. In one of these, Capt. Thomas, of the 22nd Ky., was terribly scorched. His devoted comrades, loth to leave him to the uncertain care of strangers, wrenched a door from a building and tenderly bore him along with the marching column to our next bivouac, where he was left to be cared for appropriately. Many weeks afterward he came back to his regiment a badly disfigured man."
 



(Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)
Top