22nd Kentucky Infantry

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#21
It should also be noted that on Nov. 21, 1862, while the regiment had stopped over in Louisville on its way to Cairo, Ill., to meet with Sherman for the attack on Vicksburg, no less than 125 men absented themselves without leave and remained behind when the steamers left. Company K had the most of any company that failed to return. The result of this was the 22nd Kentucky was the smallest regiment in its brigade during the Chickasaw Bayou Campaign Dec. 26-30 at about 400 men. This prompted Colonel Lindsey to issue the following in the Louisville Daily Democrat on March 26, 1863.

LDD 03-26-63 Ad for deserters.JPG
 

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#22
After a very long and laborious time, I have finally gone through every man (1,031 men total) associated with the 22nd Kentucky and made a brief biological sketch of their service during the war. Using the CSR, I entered their age at enlistment, rank and date of promotion (if any), their final disposition and date (mustered out, discharged, died, killed in action, deserted) and brief notes on their service. That includes court martial and punishments, types of wounds, stoppage for lost items, etc. I also included some info found in other sources for some men.

Not sure how many hours total this has taken but many, many hours went into this. It will be a great resource for myself and others researching this unit.
 

alan polk

2nd Lieutenant
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#25
Wow!! Well done and congratulations!!

If you don't mind, What is the disposition of a Captain Thomas of the 22nd Kentucky. He is mentioned in the Official Records as being severely burned at Champion Hill. He must have been very popular with the men. I'd like to know what ever happened with him.
 
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#26
Wow!! Well done and congratulations!!

If you don't mind, What is the disposition of a Captain Thomas of the 22nd Kentucky. He is mentioned in the Official Records as being severely burned at Champion Hill. He must have been very popular with the men. I'd like to know what ever happened with him.
Unfortunately, he would later die of chronic diarrhea later that year. Cap. Thomas seems to be a remarkable person. After the premature explosion, he was sent to hospitals to recover. He tried three different times to get back but was too weak. Below is a letter stating his desire to get back to his regiment, regardless of his injuries. Dr. Stevenson made a reference from his letters that he was still weakened from his prior injuries when he succumbs to illness. Dr. Stevenson would pen his Thomas' final letter home and Thomas left his pen to the doctor as a token of appreciation. Sadly, I can find little else about him on Ancestry or other letters he may have written.


E D Thomas to Monroe Desire to Return to Service.jpg


Stevenson Letter Evan Thomas Injuries.jpg
 
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#27
Here is what Stevenson wrote about the death of Evan D Thomas. He doesn't include a ton of names in his letters so it is obvious the good Doctor liked the young man.

1.jpg

2.jpg
 

alan polk

2nd Lieutenant
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#28
Thanks!! Somewhere in my piles of research, I have some other reference about him but I can't remember exactly where. As soon as I find it I will pass it along to you. Yes, he was evidently popular, not only with the 22nd.
 

alan polk

2nd Lieutenant
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#31
Great job!! I noticed some buried at Vicksburg. One, John Harrington, has a date of death on May 22, 1863, buried in Kentucky. Unless there is some coincidence (that date would seem to indicate KIA during second assault against the Hill City), I wonder if his family somehow had him removed to Ky?

Thanks for posting!
 
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#32
Great job!! I noticed some buried at Vicksburg. One, John Harrington, has a date of death on May 22, 1863, buried in Kentucky. Unless there is some coincidence (that date would seem to indicate KIA during second assault against the Hill City), I wonder if his family somehow had him removed to Ky?

Thanks for posting!
I'm surprised there is a marker there. His body was immediately returned to Louisville and his funeral was held in September.

Actually, he's one of the more 'famous' members of the 22nd and is the author of the most well-known letters from someone from the regiment. Stuart Sanders wrote about his two letters in the Kentucky State Historical Society's publication. He wrote one to 'Jennie' where he said he enlisted because of a girl. He then wrote a friend and has a good description of Chickasaw Bayou and his disagreement with the Emancipation Proclamation. He attempted to resign in Feb. 1863 but was denied. He was later killed in the May 22 assault in Vicksburg.

His brother, A.J. Harrington, also served in the regiment. He later became a US Marshall for Kentucky after the war and was killed in the line of duty serving a warrant.
 

alan polk

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#34
I'm surprised there is a marker there. His body was immediately returned to Louisville and his funeral was held in September.

Actually, he's one of the more 'famous' members of the 22nd and is the author of the most well-known letters from someone from the regiment. Stuart Sanders wrote about his two letters in the Kentucky State Historical Society's publication. He wrote one to 'Jennie' where he said he enlisted because of a girl. He then wrote a friend and has a good description of Chickasaw Bayou and his disagreement with the Emancipation Proclamation. He attempted to resign in Feb. 1863 but was denied. He was later killed in the May 22 assault in Vicksburg.

His brother, A.J. Harrington, also served in the regiment. He later became a US Marshall for Kentucky after the war and was killed in the line of duty serving a warrant.
My wording was bad. I meant to say that other members killed at Vicksburg have markers there. Harrington does not. My post seemed to imply that Harrington had a marker at Vicksburg and Kentucky. Sorry.
 
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#35
My wording was bad. I meant to say that other members killed at Vicksburg have markers there. Harrington does not. My post seemed to imply that Harrington had a marker at Vicksburg and Kentucky. Sorry.
Gotcha. Unfortunately, my 4x great uncle is one of many who do not have a stone. Just a number of an unknown.

We have corresponded previously on CWT regarding your visit to Frankfort. My GGG Grandfather was Philip Swigert. His brother Jacob was an officer in the 22nd Kentucky, which I had forgotten until reading through this thread.
Yes, he actually became the captain of Company G after Evan Thomas passed. The initial camp was named Camp Swigert as well...a very prominent family around that time. I run across the Swigert name frequently in my research.
 
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#36
Below is a link to a virtual cemetery for men of the 22nd Kentucky. It is something that I am working on continuously in my spare time.

https://www.findagrave.com/virtual-cemetery/818850
Thank you for creating a virtual cemetery for the 22nd Kentucky. You can add Richard I. Frayne. He lived in Kansas for many years, then moved to Tacoma, WA, in 1890. The following year he moved to Whidbey Island, WA, where he bought some property, hoping to start a farm, but he died from influenza soon after arriving.

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/30524867/richard-ivers-frayne
 
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#37
Thank you for creating a virtual cemetery for the 22nd Kentucky. You can add Richard I. Frayne. He lived in Kansas for many years, then moved to Tacoma, WA, in 1890. The following year he moved to Whidbey Island, WA, where he bought some property, hoping to start a farm, but he died from influenza soon after arriving.

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/30524867/richard-ivers-frayne
Thank you! I will add him. Hard to know where some of these guys wound up. You undoubtedly know about his commemorative sword at the Kentucky Historical Society museum?
 

bdtex

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#38
It should also be noted that on Nov. 21, 1862, while the regiment had stopped over in Louisville on its way to Cairo, Ill., to meet with Sherman for the attack on Vicksburg, no less than 125 men absented themselves without leave and remained behind when the steamers left.
Did you see/find anything in subsequent letters or diaries as to why so many went AWOL at once?
 
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#39
Did you see/find anything in subsequent letters or diaries as to why so many went AWOL at once?
Well I think it was a combination of things. First, the men (some) had not been home to Louisville since they enlisted. Secondly, the men had just been paid when they first got there. Thirdly, most had just survived the Masterful Retreat from the Cumberland Gap without much if anything in terms of food and were tired of war. Fourth, the order to move out came late and some men simply missed the boat and wasn't aboard the transport when it left.

So basically it was a perfect storm of a variety of things. But those missing men were sorely missed at Chickasaw Bayou where the regiment only had about 400-450 able men in the storming of the works there.
 
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#40
Thank you for creating a virtual cemetery for the 22nd Kentucky. You can add Richard I. Frayne. He lived in Kansas for many years, then moved to Tacoma, WA, in 1890. The following year he moved to Whidbey Island, WA, where he bought some property, hoping to start a farm, but he died from influenza soon after arriving.

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/30524867/richard-ivers-frayne
Hi Frayne17. Richard Frayne was brother-in-law to my ggggrandfather John Meridith. They married sisters. Do you know much about the Frayne's? Richard and my grandfather John went together into the 22nd, company F. Took me years to find John in my family and I lost him in 1862. He was left at Memphis with a disability. Anything you could add about Richard, may help me locate or learn more about John. I'm so proud they served. I've learned so much about the Civil War by searching for John. Thank you.
 



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