Coast Arty 2 More "Lady" Cannons Any Info?

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redbob

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Here is what I read---


Kodak picture of the gun
"Lady SLocomb" as it lay
for years at the street at
Mobile Ala., taken by a
northern tourist and given
to T. B. Hull of 5th Co(?)

IV.(?) A., who donated this
picture to Memorial
Hall Aug 6th 1900.
5th Company W.A. (Washington Artillery?)
 
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redbob

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I don't know, but it was staffed by members of the 5th Company of the Washington Artillery when it was in the Mobile Defenses. What is the cannon out in front of the Confederate Memorial Hall in New Orleans?
155_1253_02_7652f776-5056-b365-ab1b8e911b4a1cbf (2).jpg
 
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ucvrelics

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Story

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It very well may be the same one according to the marker displayed with the cannon.
https://www.hmdb.org/marker.asp?marker=38901
There's a writeup on how the Washingtons took it out of Atlanta after the war in (a forgotten volume) of Confederate Veteran magazine. You'll have to poke through back issues to find it.

Mentioned in passing here. It was emotionally significant to the New Orleanites - part of one of a four-gun battery at Redoubt Blair. See p.23
https://books.google.com/books?id=9s8_AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA23&lpg=PA23&dq="Lady+Slocomb"+"confederate+veteran"&source=bl&ots=mq57boNlvP&sig=ACfU3U0AMNM60BYBmfWRQ6o4sAJvjjuDRA&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiOosnxndLiAhVRT98KHdbVDzAQ6AEwBnoECAkQAQ#v=onepage&q="Lady Slocomb" "confederate veteran"&f=false
 
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Story

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Came across these 2 to add to the list of cannons named for Ladies. The Lady Davis was at Port Hudson
At Island No. 10 the Confederates had two guns which they
named the Lady Davis and Lady Polk. And in the naval
records of the war recently published by the government
there is an interesting note. It is an order of Commodore
Davis, of the Union fleet, directing that a vessel be sent to
Island No. 10 to procure fragments of the Lady Polk and
Lady Davis, to be delivered to Sister Angela, of the Order of
the Holy Cross, to be cast in statues for the hospital.

https://archive.org/stream/confederatevete1927conf_7/confederatevete1927conf_7_djvu.txt

Also
"Lady Davis". Named for Varina Howell Davis, the first lady of the Confederacy, this 10-inch Columbiad at Port Hudson, Louisiana, became known to the Union soldiers as "Old Demoralizer". The weapon had also been stationed on Island No. 10 for a while, along with a 128-Pounder known as "Lady Polk Jr".
from
https://civilwartalk.com/threads/civil-war-guns-named-for-prominient-ladies-during-civil-war-era.73112/
 
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AUG

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I had posted the following in another thread: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/civil-war-guns-named-for-prominient-ladies-during-civil-war-era.73112/

The Lady Slocomb (an 8-inch Columbiad) was named for Mrs. Abigail "Abby" H. Day Slocomb, wife of Capt. Cuthbert H. Slocomb who commanded the 5th Company, Washington Artillery, known as one of the best battery commanders in the Army of Tennessee.

Lady Slocomb was famously used in Siege of Spanish Fort during the Mobile Campaign in March-April 1865 - served on the landward face by the 5th Company, Washington Artillery. It was recorded that Lady Slocomb fired 44 shell, 18 solid shot, 13 grape, and 6 canister throughout the siege, until disabled by counter-battery fire on April 4. She was later recovered in 1899 and put on display at the Confederate Memorial Hall in New Orleans.

At Spanish Fort the 5th Co., Washington Artillery was also equipped with two 12-pound Napoleons, one 3-inch Ordnance Rifle, and four mortars. The two Napoleons were "Lady Vaught" (after Lt. William Vaught's wife) and "Cora Slocomb" (after the captain's daughter), and the 3-inch Ordnance Rifle was "General Gibson" (after Randall H. Gibson). Two of the four Coehorn mortars were named "Theresa" and "Louise" after the peanut- and apple-vending girls at a coffeehouse in Mobile.

This is according to The Pride of the Confederate Artillery: The Washington Artillery in the Army of Tennessee by Nathaniel Cheairs Hughes.


Here's Lady Slocomb outside the Confederate Memorial Hall today. Another interesting fact is that veterans of the 14th Texas Cavalry (dismounted) who served alongside the Washington Artillerymen at Spanish Fort later provided funds for the granite base that she sits on.

4651533108_2746033400_b-jpg.jpg


confederate-memorial-jpg.jpg
 

Viper21

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I had posted the following in another thread: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/civil-war-guns-named-for-prominient-ladies-during-civil-war-era.73112/

The Lady Slocomb (an 8-inch Columbiad) was named for Mrs. Abigail "Abby" H. Day Slocomb, wife of Capt. Cuthbert H. Slocomb who commanded the 5th Company, Washington Artillery, known as one of the best battery commanders in the Army of Tennessee.

Lady Slocomb was famously used in Siege of Spanish Fort during the Mobile Campaign in March-April 1865 - served on the landward face by the 5th Company, Washington Artillery. It was recorded that Lady Slocomb fired 44 shell, 18 solid shot, 13 grape, and 6 canister throughout the siege, until disabled by counter-battery fire on April 4. She was later recovered in 1899 and put on display at the Confederate Memorial Hall in New Orleans.

At Spanish Fort the 5th Co., Washington Artillery was also equipped with two 12-pound Napoleons, one 3-inch Ordnance Rifle, and four mortars. The two Napoleons were "Lady Vaught" (after Lt. William Vaught's wife) and "Cora Slocomb" (after the captain's daughter), and the 3-inch Ordnance Rifle was "General Gibson" (after Randall H. Gibson). Two of the four Coehorn mortars were named "Theresa" and "Louise" after the peanut- and apple-vending girls at a coffeehouse in Mobile.

This is according to The Pride of the Confederate Artillery: The Washington Artillery in the Army of Tennessee by Nathaniel Cheairs Hughes.


Here's Lady Slocomb outside the Confederate Memorial Hall today. Another interesting fact is that veterans of the 14th Texas Cavalry (dismounted) who served alongside the Washington Artillerymen at Spanish Fort later provided funds for the granite base that she sits on.

View attachment 310714

View attachment 310715
An uncle of mine was in 5th Co. Washington Artillery. He was seriously wounded at Shiloh. After recovering from his wounds, he was transferred to the Engineer Troops as a 1st Lt. He was among some of the last officers to surrender in Shreveport.

last-surrender.jpg


THE LAST TO LAY DOWN ARMS
Recovered from oblivion only after a long and patient search, this is believed to be the last Confederate war photograph taken. On May 26, 1865, General E. Kirby Smith surrendered the troops in the Trans-Mississippi Department. Paroled by that capitulation these officers gathered in Shreveport, Louisiana, early in June to commemorate by means of the camera their long connection with the war. The oldest of them was but 40. The clothes in which they fought were worn to tatters, but each has donned the dress coat of an unused uniform carefully saved in some chest in the belief that it was to identify him with a victorious cause and not as here with a lost one. The names of those standing, from left to right, are: David French Boyd, Major of Engineers; D. C. Proctor, First Louisiana Engineers; unidentified; and William Freret. The names of those seated are: Richard M. Venable; H. T. Douglas, Colonel of Engineers; and Octave Hopkins, First Louisiana Engineers.


My ancestor is seated right. Lt Octave Hopkins. His father, James A. Hopkins was my GGG Grandfather.

Paroled on June 7th, 1865. Octave, & one of his brothers (Alfred), boarded the steamboat Kentucky, for the trip home to New Orleans. It sank...!! 200 drowned in the sinking. Fortunately, Octave, & his brother both survived, & eventually made it back to New Orleans.

Octave died relatively young (53). He died at the Greenbriar, in White Sulphur Springs, WV. He like many folks, would go their seeking relief for ailments from the sulphur baths.
 
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