2-8-21 "Always present when most needed"

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Trivia Master

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I was born in 1815 in New Hampshire, the youngest of five children. Not being married, I made a living from various occupations. By 1861 I ran a boarding house for students. When the war broke out I offered my service to the recruiters at Camp Union in Concord. I was put into service with the 2nd New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry where I served through two enlistment periods without a furlough.
I may say that Colonel Gilman Marston held me in high esteem and once said about me, that he saw me "face a cannon battery without flinching while a man took refuge behind [me] for safety from flying shells".
I was twice captured in battle, but released again. At the Second Battle of Bull Run I was taken as a prisoner but released.
Once, Stonewall Jackson himself allowed me to return to the Union line.
I stayed with my regiment until December 25, 1865, when the regiment was mustered out of service, which ended my service also. For my service I was awarded with the cross of the 18th Corps, the diamond of the 3rd Corps of Hooker's Division, the heart of the 12th Corps, and a gold badge from the 2nd New Hampshire.
After the war I was appointed by William E. Chandler to a Treasury Department clerkship in Washington, D.C. which I held for twenty-eight years until 1895. My military pension I always donated to those in need.
I did not return to New Hampshire until 1900, when the circle of my life ended in Concord, April 24. Now I rest in Blossom Hill Cemetery.

1) Who am I?
2) For what reason was I released again after being taken prisoner at the 2nd Battle of Bull Run?

credit: @FarawayFriend
 

DBF

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My favorite line in the article: “Miss Dame was the bravest woman I ever knew. I have seen her face a battery without flinching, while a man took refuge behind her to avoid the flying fragments of bursting shells.”

This Grande Dame was: Harriet Patience Dame
She was released when she showed General Jackson her nursing paraphernalia (bandages for the wounded, her flask and her medicines) and he knew she wasn't a spy but a nurse.

http://www.images-of-new-hampshire-history.com/On-This-Day-in-New-Hampshire-History.php

Edit - Your source supports your answer, so you will get credit for it.

hoosier
 
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1) Who am I ? Harriet Patience Dame

2) For what reason was I released again after being taken prisoner at the 2nd Battle of Bull Run ? Dame was taken as a prisoner but released because she cared for Union and Confederate soldiers indiscriminately.

As an aside, in 1901 the New Hampshire Legislature commissioned that her portrait be painted and hung in the New Hampshire State House. It was the first portrait of a woman to hang there.

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WJC

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I was born in 1815 in New Hampshire, the youngest of five children. Not being married, I made a living from various occupations. By 1861 I ran a boarding house for students. When the war broke out I offered my service to the recruiters at Camp Union in Concord. I was put into service with the 2nd New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry where I served through two enlistment periods without a furlough.
I may say that Colonel Gilman Marston held me in high esteem and once said about me, that he saw me "face a cannon battery without flinching while a man took refuge behind [me] for safety from flying shells".
I was twice captured in battle, but released again. At the Second Battle of Bull Run I was taken as a prisoner but released.
Once, Stonewall Jackson himself allowed me to return to the Union line.
I stayed with my regiment until December 25, 1865, when the regiment was mustered out of service, which ended my service also. For my service I was awarded with the cross of the 18th Corps, the diamond of the 3rd Corps of Hooker's Division, the heart of the 12th Corps, and a gold badge from the 2nd New Hampshire.
After the war I was appointed by William E. Chandler to a Treasury Department clerkship in Washington, D.C. which I held for twenty-eight years until 1895. My military pension I always donated to those in need.
I did not return to New Hampshire until 1900, when the circle of my life ended in Concord, April 24. Now I rest in Blossom Hill Cemetery.

1) Who am I?
2) For what reason was I released again after being taken prisoner at the 2nd Battle of Bull Run?

credit: @FarawayFriend
1) Harriet Patience Dame (1815-1900).
2) Recognition that she cared for wounded from both sides indiscriminately.
 
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