1st Nebraska Infantry/Cavalry

huskerblitz

Major
Joined
Jun 8, 2013
Location
Nebraska
Greetings. I read in your post that Col. Robert Ramsey Livingston of the 1st Nebraska Calvary was stations in the Batesville, AR district during November-December 1863. In my Hawkins family genealogy research I read in Col. Williams Monks Book, "A History of Southern Missouri and Northern Arkansas" that my great uncle, John Calvin Hawkins, was captured and executed by firing squad in mid December 1863 in the area around Batesville and Izard County under the direction of Col. Livingston and Col. Monks. Do you have or can you direct me to where I might find detailed information about this execution. I've search ed t official reports of the "War of the Rebellion, the National Archives, and Arkansas civil war archives and found no information. Thank you.
Have you looked at OR, ser. 1, vol. 22, part 2, page 750?
 

asdxrwhosu

Cadet
Joined
Nov 4, 2018
First Nebraska Cavalry
NEBRASKA
(3-YEARS)
(formerly 1st Infantry)

First Nebraska Cavalry. -- Cols., John M. Thayer, Robert R.
Livingston; Lieut.-Cols., Hiram P. Dowans, William D. McCord,
Robert R. Livingston, William Baumer, Majs., William D.
McCord, Robert R. Livingston, William Baumer, Allen Blacker,
George Armstrong, Thomas J. Majors.

This regiment, recruited from the territory at large,
rendezvoused at Omaha and was there mustered into the U. S.
service by companies, from June 11 to July 21, 1861, as the
1st Nebraska infantry, for a term of three years. By Special
Orders, No. 278, headquarters Department of Missouri, Oct. 11,
1863, it was changed to cavalry and designated the 1st
Nebraska cavalry.

The original members (except veterans) were mustered out at
Omaha Aug. 24-25, 1864, and the organization, composed of
veterans and recruits, continued in service. By authority of
the war department, the 1st battalion Nebraska veteran cavalry
(four companies) was consolidated with it July 18, 1865, and
the consolidated force was designated the 1st regiment
Nebraska veteran cavalry. It was mustered out at Omaha July
1, 1866, after a total period of service of nearly five years.

The 1st battalion, under command of Col. Thayer embarked at
Omaha for St. Joseph, Mo., July 30, 1861. From St. Joseph it
moved to St. Louis and thence to Pilot Knob where it was
joined Aug. 15 by the remainder of the regiment.

It served at various points in Missouri until Feb., 1862, its
winter quarters being established at Georgetown, Mo., from
which point it engaged in scouting after bushwhackers, in
expeditions to Warrensburg and Milford, Mo., and in the
skirmishing and hard marches which resulted in the capture of
about 1,300 Confederates who were on their way to join Gen.
Price's army.

On Feb. 2, 1862, it was ordered to Tennessee and arrived at
Fort Henry on the 11th, whence it moved to Fort Donelson on
the 13th. It was assigned to Gen. Wallace's (3rd) division,
Col. Thayer being in command of the 3rd brigade, to which it
was attached, and Lieut.-Col. McCord commanding the regiment.

Says Col. Thayer, in his report of the action on the 15th
speaking of the 1st Neb.: "I am pleased to be able to say that
every officer and soldier behaved very gallantly throughout. *
* * I cannot omit to speak in high terms of the soldierly
bearing and efficient conduct of Lieut.-Col. McCord and Maj.
Livingston during the engagement."

Gen. Wallace said: "Too much praise cannot be given Lieut.-
Col. McCord and his sturdy regiment."

During the last sally of the enemy, Lieut. Wood's artillery
company and the 1st Neb. sustained and repulsed the attack of
three regiments of infantry and a squadron of horse. They met
the storm without a man flinching, and drove the enemy back in
confusion. Though subjected to a hot fire for nearly an hour,
the enemy fired too high and the regiment lost only 3 killed
and 7 wounded.

After the surrender of Fort. Donelson the regiment returned to
Fort Henry, whence it moved March 13 to Crump's landing. On
April 7 it was again actively engaged at Shiloh in the second
day's fight, where it once more rendered glorious service and
received the highest praise from Gen. Wallace for its bravery
and gallantry.

Says Col. Thayer: "Nobly did the 1st Neb. sustain its
reputation, well earned on the field of Donelson. Its
progress was onward during the whole day, in face of a galling
fire of the enemy, moving on without flinching, at one time
being an hour and a half in front of their battery, receiving
and returning its fire, its conduct was most excellent." The
loss of the regiment in this battle was 4 men killed, 5
officers and 17 men wounded, 2 men missing.

The regiment next participated in the advance upon and siege
of Corinth, after which it was ordered to Memphis and arrived
there June 17. A week later it embarked for Helena, Ark., and
on its arrival went into camp on Graveyard hill. Here it was
engaged in several scouts and expeditions until Oct. 5, when
it moved to Sulphur springs, Mo., and at the close of the
month marched to Pilot Knob and encamped.

On Nov. 2 it moved to Patterson, Mo., where it performed
fatigue duty on the fortifications and shared in several
expeditions. During the remainder of the winter the 1st
engaged in many severe marches with Gen. Davidson's forces to
various points in Missouri and Arkansas, and on March 11, 1863
was ordered to Cape Girardeau.

It was active here in April, during the attack of Gen.
Marmaduke, and later followed in the pursuit, being engaged at
Chalk bluff and St. Francis River. Returning to Cape
Girardeau, it remained there on guard, picket and fatigue duty
until Aug. 28 when it moved to St. Louis and was quartered at
Camp Gamble until Nov. 1.

While here the regiment was recruited to the full complement
of a cavalry regiment and was changed to that arm of the
service as already mentioned. Having been mounted and
equipped during Nov., 1863, it was assigned to a brigade
commanded by Col. Livingston, who was in charge of the
Batesville district of Arkansas.

The command arrived at Batesville on Dec. 25, and was engaged
in scouting and picket duty until Jan. 18, 1864, when it
assisted in the capture of a detachment of the enemy on Black
River. The next day it charged into the town of Jacksonport,
Ark. where a number of Confederates were killed and some
prisoners taken.

Soon after a detachment of the regiment was engaged in a three
days' running fight with a force of the enemy under Col.
Freeman in the Sycamore Mountains, severely punishing them.
On Feb. 11 it went on a scout to Pocahontas and on April 23
proceeded to Jacksonport, where on the next day it had a sharp
skirmish with the enemy including a running fight of 7 miles.

It continued scouting and skirmishing in this vicinity until
May 25, when it moved to Devall's Bluff, where it arrived May
30. In the summer of this year the veterans went home on 30
days' furlough and on the expiration of their furlough the
regiment was assigned to duty in Nebraska with headquarters at
Fort Kearny.

In Sept., 1864, a detachment of the regiment went on a scout
after hostile Indians on the Republican and Solomon forks of
the Kansas River, during which it marched 800 miles in 23
days.

The remainder of its term of service was by detachments at
different points in Nebraska in scouting and escort duty,
guarding the overland mail and stage route, and engaging in
frequent skirmishes with bands of hostile Indians.

The welcome order to proceed to Omaha for muster-out was
received June 10, 1866, and the final muster-out took place
there on July 1.

The regiment marched during its term of service over 9,000
miles and including transportation by water and rail traveled
about 15,000 miles. While the war of the rebellion was in
progress it rendered faithful service on many a hard fought
field.

When the war closed it hastened to the protection of Nebraska
which was threatened with disastrous raids by hostile Indians,
and engaged in this arduous service for more than a year.

Source: The Union Army, vol. 4, p. 454

*************************************************************************

Shiloh after battle report:

Report of Lieut. Col. William D. McCord, First Nebraska Infantry.

HDQRS. FIRST REGT. NEBRASKA VOLUNTEERS, In the
Field, near Pittsburg, Tenn., April 10, 1862.
CAPT.: I have the honor to present the following report of the part
taken by the First Regt. Nebraska Volunteers in the battle of April
7, 1862, at Pittsburg:

On Sunday, April 6, at about 12 o'clock m., my regiment was moved
by order of Col. Thayer from camp 2 miles west of Crump's
Landing, with a view to connect with the forces under Gen. Grant at
Pittsburg. We reached the encampment of our troops near Pittsburg
about 7 o'clock p. m. Sunday night and bivouacked under a heavy
rain-storm. Company G, Capt. McConihe commanding, was thrown
forward as a picked about 200 yards in advance of the regiment. About
5.30 a. m. the regiment was moved forward in support of Capt.
Thompson's Ninth battery Indiana light Artillery, occupying a position
on its right in an open field immediately in front of a deep ravine and
a high ridge beyond. After a short engagement with three of the
enemy's guns posted on the ridge in our front we were advanced, by
order of Brig.-Gen. Thayer, driving the enemy before us, and
forming a new line of battle one-half mile forward, at which place the
enemy opened a most terrific fire of grape and canister on us, killing 1
sergeant and wounding 1 lieutenant and 1 color guard. The regiment
was ordered to lie down, or we could not possibly have escaped as well
as we did. The enemy was again dislodged. Again we advanced, moving
to the right, and forming a new line of battle just under the
brow of hill, within about 150 yards of a large battery of the enemy,
which, owing to our position, did us no harm whatever.

The enemy's guns being silence, we were by Gen. Thayer again
ordered forward, and formed our line in a field, our right resting on the
left of the Twenty-third Indiana. There our regiment opened fire upon
a body of the enemy who were charging on our line and repulsed them.
Again we were ordered forward, and formed a line in a new direction
(the enemy having tried to flank us on our left), opened fire upon the
enemy's forces, who were advancing in support of one of their batteries.
Here we received the most destructive fire that had yet been opened
upon us, losing 3 killed and quite a number wounded, amongst whom
were Capt. McConihe, Lieut.'s Weatherwax, Gillette, Curran, and
a number of our non-commissioned officers and privates. The enemy's
fire was returned until the men became short of ammunition, when we
were relieved by the Seventy-sixth Ohio, Col. Woods, our regiment
marching through his, by the right of companies to the rear into column.
Col. Woods' regiment then took our position, while we retired to a
ravine in our rear and replenished our ammunition. The movements of
both regiments were conducted and executed as orderly as could be done
on the parade ground. After refilling our cartridge-boxes we again
advanced to our old position. My regiment was in the action from 5.30
a. m. until 5 p. m., and I am proud to say that it steadily advanced and
never receded an inch, being at one time alone engaged with one of the
enemy's batteries for about twenty minutes.

I cannot conclude without expressing myself in the warmest terms in
praise of the gallant conduct of the following officers: Maj. R. R.
Livingston; First Lieut. F. L. Cramer, acting adjutant; First
Lieut. N. J. Sharp, commanding, and Second Lieut. J. McF.
Hagood, of Company A; Capt. Baumer, commanding, and First and
Second Lieut.'s Bimmerman and Lubbes, of Company B; Capt.
Maj.'s, commanding, and First and Second Lieut.'s Berger and
Ivory of Company C; First Lieut. Lee P. Gillette, commanding, and
Second Lieut. Provost, Company D; First Lieut. S. M. Curran,
commanding Company E; First Lieut. J. P. Murphy, commanding,
and Second Lieut. Fred. Smith, Company F; Capt. John
McConihe, commanding, and First and Second Lieut.'s Weatherwax
and Hance, Company G; First Lieut. L. M. Sawyer, commanding,
and Second Lieut. Clarke Company H; Second Lieut. Emory
Peck, commanding Company I, and Second Lieut. Edward
Donovan, commanding Company K, together with the non
commissioned officers and privates engaged in this hard-fought battle.
Particularly do I present to your notice Maj. R. R. Livingston, and
First Lieut. F. L. Cramer, acting adjutant of the regiment, whose
efficiency in carrying orders and otherwise aiding me is worthy of all
praise; also Dr. William McClellan, assistant surgeon, who most
promptly and kindly attended to the wounded, rendering them the most
signal service, and receiving all the most glowing encomiums for his
celerity and skill, rendering aid alike to friend and foe.

Our casualties are as follows.*
I have the honor to be, colonel, your most obedient servant.

WM. D. McCORD,
Lieut.-Col., Comdg. First Regiments Nebraska Volunteers.

S. A. STRICKLAND,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-Gen., Second Brigade.

Source: Official Records: Series I. Vol. 10. Part I, Reports. Serial No. 10

**********************************************************************

Report of Col. R. R. Livingston, First Nebraska Infantry, of the pursuit
of Marmaduke.

SAINT LOUIS, April 30., 1863.
CAPT.: Having been instructed, on the night of the 25th instant, by
order (copy of which I inclose, marked A.), to take charge of the
Thirty-seventh Regt. Illinois Volunteer Infantry, Capt. Brown's company (G),
Twenty-third Regiments Missouri Volunteer Infantry, and 20 men, under
Lieut. Ewing, Twenty-third Iowa, to see them shipped without delay to
re-enforce the post of Cape Girardeau, then return to this post immediately
after the attack had ceased, I have the honor to reports as follows;

We arrived at Cape Girardeau on Sunday, 26th instant, at 2.50 p. m., just
as the firing on both sides ceased for that day. I turned over my and was
ordered by him to move with the companies of the Thirty-seventh Illinois
Infantry, under Capt. [Charles W.] Hawes, to report to Lieut.-Col.
[William] Baumer, at Fort B, as the enemy were attempting to flank our
right. Shortly afterward I received an order to take change of my own
regiment; but, finding the conduct of Lieut.-Col. Baumer, of the First
Nebraska, all that could be desired, I, in the spirit of a soldier,
permitted him to retain the command he had fought so gallantly previous to
my arrival. Fearing a night attack, I went with Gen. McNeil, and arranged
a system of signals with two gunboats, then lying in the Mississippi River,
opposite the town, by which they could direct their fire where it would be
most effective. Gen. McNeil, at my suggestion, also sent for
re-enforcements to Gen. Asboth, commanding at Columbus, Ky., whose
promptness in forwarding the troops is deserving of all praise.

When daylight broke, the enemy had not appeared before our pickets,
and two detachments of cavalry were sent out to feel them; but it was
not before 11.30 a. m., the 27th instant, that the retrograde movement
of the enemy toward Bloomfield was definitely ascertained; and at 2 p.
m. two regiments of cavalry (First Wisconsin and Second Missouri),
four guns of Welfley's battery, two mountain howitzers, and two
companies of Col. McLane's Missouri Militia moved out in pursuit,
on the Bloomfield road. Arriving near Black Creek, the advance under
Maj. [William H.] Torrey, First Wisconsin, drove a small force of the
enemy from the bridge, which they had commenced to destroy, by tearing up
plank and piling dry stakes in the bridges, preparatory to firing it. The
bridge was speedily repaired, and we pushed on to the junction of the
Jackson and Bloomfield roads, where was met the advance of General
Vandever's column. There the column halted. Myself and a small party pushed
forward to the bridge across White Water, about 1 1/2 miles distant, and
found the last span destroyed, the stringers being cut, the plank thrown in
the river, and the up-stream post on the last bent cut in such a manner as
to render it useless. To my great surprise, no further progress was made
that day, our forces being ordered into camp at 6 p. m., with a demoralized
and flying enemy only one hour ahead of us.

I left camp the next morning at 7.10 o'clock, at which time our forces
had not yet pushed forward; and feeling convinced that so tardy a
pursuit would certainly be a vain one, I returned to this post with all
dispatch, knowing my services were needed here.

I would respectfully state that the enemy were confident of carrying and
holding Cape Girardeau; that their battle cry was, "Hurrah now for
McNeil!" and that, in their conversations with the peaceful citizens, they
asked if Fayetteville had been attacked, stating that place and the Cape
were to be struck the same time, and that on Sunday, 3d of May next, Price,
with 30,000 men, would attack Jefferson City, after which the forces at
the Cape and that place were to make a combined attack on Saint Louis.

I refrain from giving you the particulars of the battle or the losses on
either side, as competent authority will soon furnish the official report.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. R. LIVINGTON,
Col. 1st Regt. Nebraska Vol. Infty., Cmdg. Post, Saint Louis, Mo.

Capt. H. C. FILLEBROWN,
Assistant Adjutant-Gen., District of Saint Louis, Mo.

[Inclosure A.]

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 91., HDQRS. SAINT LOUIS DISTRICT,
Saint Louis, Mo., April 25, 1863.

* * * * * * *

XVIII. Col. R. R. Livingston, First Nebraska Infantry Volunteers, will
proceed to Cape Girardeau, Mo. He will take command of all troops going
down to that point. Upon his arrival he will turn over the troops to the
command of Brig. Gen. John McNeil.

By order of Brig.-Gen. Davidson;

HENRY C. FILLEBROWN,
Assistant Adjutant-Gen.

Source: Official Records
CHAP. XXXIV.] MARMADUKE'S EXPEDITION INTO MISSOURI. PAGE 266-32
[Series I. Vol. 22. Part I, Reports. Serial No. 32.]
Information provided by @east tennessee roots
Nebraska and the Civil War
 

asdxrwhosu

Cadet
Joined
Nov 4, 2018
First Nebraska Cavalry
NEBRASKA
(3-YEARS)
(formerly 1st Infantry)

First Nebraska Cavalry. -- Cols., John M. Thayer, Robert R.
Livingston; Lieut.-Cols., Hiram P. Dowans, William D. McCord,
Robert R. Livingston, William Baumer, Majs., William D.
McCord, Robert R. Livingston, William Baumer, Allen Blacker,
George Armstrong, Thomas J. Majors.

This regiment, recruited from the territory at large,
rendezvoused at Omaha and was there mustered into the U. S.
service by companies, from June 11 to July 21, 1861, as the
1st Nebraska infantry, for a term of three years. By Special
Orders, No. 278, headquarters Department of Missouri, Oct. 11,
1863, it was changed to cavalry and designated the 1st
Nebraska cavalry.

The original members (except veterans) were mustered out at
Omaha Aug. 24-25, 1864, and the organization, composed of
veterans and recruits, continued in service. By authority of
the war department, the 1st battalion Nebraska veteran cavalry
(four companies) was consolidated with it July 18, 1865, and
the consolidated force was designated the 1st regiment
Nebraska veteran cavalry. It was mustered out at Omaha July
1, 1866, after a total period of service of nearly five years.

The 1st battalion, under command of Col. Thayer embarked at
Omaha for St. Joseph, Mo., July 30, 1861. From St. Joseph it
moved to St. Louis and thence to Pilot Knob where it was
joined Aug. 15 by the remainder of the regiment.

It served at various points in Missouri until Feb., 1862, its
winter quarters being established at Georgetown, Mo., from
which point it engaged in scouting after bushwhackers, in
expeditions to Warrensburg and Milford, Mo., and in the
skirmishing and hard marches which resulted in the capture of
about 1,300 Confederates who were on their way to join Gen.
Price's army.

On Feb. 2, 1862, it was ordered to Tennessee and arrived at
Fort Henry on the 11th, whence it moved to Fort Donelson on
the 13th. It was assigned to Gen. Wallace's (3rd) division,
Col. Thayer being in command of the 3rd brigade, to which it
was attached, and Lieut.-Col. McCord commanding the regiment.

Says Col. Thayer, in his report of the action on the 15th
speaking of the 1st Neb.: "I am pleased to be able to say that
every officer and soldier behaved very gallantly throughout. *
* * I cannot omit to speak in high terms of the soldierly
bearing and efficient conduct of Lieut.-Col. McCord and Maj.
Livingston during the engagement."

Gen. Wallace said: "Too much praise cannot be given Lieut.-
Col. McCord and his sturdy regiment."

During the last sally of the enemy, Lieut. Wood's artillery
company and the 1st Neb. sustained and repulsed the attack of
three regiments of infantry and a squadron of horse. They met
the storm without a man flinching, and drove the enemy back in
confusion. Though subjected to a hot fire for nearly an hour,
the enemy fired too high and the regiment lost only 3 killed
and 7 wounded.

After the surrender of Fort. Donelson the regiment returned to
Fort Henry, whence it moved March 13 to Crump's landing. On
April 7 it was again actively engaged at Shiloh in the second
day's fight, where it once more rendered glorious service and
received the highest praise from Gen. Wallace for its bravery
and gallantry.

Says Col. Thayer: "Nobly did the 1st Neb. sustain its
reputation, well earned on the field of Donelson. Its
progress was onward during the whole day, in face of a galling
fire of the enemy, moving on without flinching, at one time
being an hour and a half in front of their battery, receiving
and returning its fire, its conduct was most excellent." The
loss of the regiment in this battle was 4 men killed, 5
officers and 17 men wounded, 2 men missing.

The regiment next participated in the advance upon and siege
of Corinth, after which it was ordered to Memphis and arrived
there June 17. A week later it embarked for Helena, Ark., and
on its arrival went into camp on Graveyard hill. Here it was
engaged in several scouts and expeditions until Oct. 5, when
it moved to Sulphur springs, Mo., and at the close of the
month marched to Pilot Knob and encamped.

On Nov. 2 it moved to Patterson, Mo., where it performed
fatigue duty on the fortifications and shared in several
expeditions. During the remainder of the winter the 1st
engaged in many severe marches with Gen. Davidson's forces to
various points in Missouri and Arkansas, and on March 11, 1863
was ordered to Cape Girardeau.

It was active here in April, during the attack of Gen.
Marmaduke, and later followed in the pursuit, being engaged at
Chalk bluff and St. Francis River. Returning to Cape
Girardeau, it remained there on guard, picket and fatigue duty
until Aug. 28 when it moved to St. Louis and was quartered at
Camp Gamble until Nov. 1.

While here the regiment was recruited to the full complement
of a cavalry regiment and was changed to that arm of the
service as already mentioned. Having been mounted and
equipped during Nov., 1863, it was assigned to a brigade
commanded by Col. Livingston, who was in charge of the
Batesville district of Arkansas.

The command arrived at Batesville on Dec. 25, and was engaged
in scouting and picket duty until Jan. 18, 1864, when it
assisted in the capture of a detachment of the enemy on Black
River. The next day it charged into the town of Jacksonport,
Ark. where a number of Confederates were killed and some
prisoners taken.

Soon after a detachment of the regiment was engaged in a three
days' running fight with a force of the enemy under Col.
Freeman in the Sycamore Mountains, severely punishing them.
On Feb. 11 it went on a scout to Pocahontas and on April 23
proceeded to Jacksonport, where on the next day it had a sharp
skirmish with the enemy including a running fight of 7 miles.

It continued scouting and skirmishing in this vicinity until
May 25, when it moved to Devall's Bluff, where it arrived May
30. In the summer of this year the veterans went home on 30
days' furlough and on the expiration of their furlough the
regiment was assigned to duty in Nebraska with headquarters at
Fort Kearny.

In Sept., 1864, a detachment of the regiment went on a scout
after hostile Indians on the Republican and Solomon forks of
the Kansas River, during which it marched 800 miles in 23
days.

The remainder of its term of service was by detachments at
different points in Nebraska in scouting and escort duty,
guarding the overland mail and stage route, and engaging in
frequent skirmishes with bands of hostile Indians.

The welcome order to proceed to Omaha for muster-out was
received June 10, 1866, and the final muster-out took place
there on July 1.

The regiment marched during its term of service over 9,000
miles and including transportation by water and rail traveled
about 15,000 miles. While the war of the rebellion was in
progress it rendered faithful service on many a hard fought
field.

When the war closed it hastened to the protection of Nebraska
which was threatened with disastrous raids by hostile Indians,
and engaged in this arduous service for more than a year.

Source: The Union Army, vol. 4, p. 454

*************************************************************************

Shiloh after battle report:

Report of Lieut. Col. William D. McCord, First Nebraska Infantry.

HDQRS. FIRST REGT. NEBRASKA VOLUNTEERS, In the
Field, near Pittsburg, Tenn., April 10, 1862.
CAPT.: I have the honor to present the following report of the part
taken by the First Regt. Nebraska Volunteers in the battle of April
7, 1862, at Pittsburg:

On Sunday, April 6, at about 12 o'clock m., my regiment was moved
by order of Col. Thayer from camp 2 miles west of Crump's
Landing, with a view to connect with the forces under Gen. Grant at
Pittsburg. We reached the encampment of our troops near Pittsburg
about 7 o'clock p. m. Sunday night and bivouacked under a heavy
rain-storm. Company G, Capt. McConihe commanding, was thrown
forward as a picked about 200 yards in advance of the regiment. About
5.30 a. m. the regiment was moved forward in support of Capt.
Thompson's Ninth battery Indiana light Artillery, occupying a position
on its right in an open field immediately in front of a deep ravine and
a high ridge beyond. After a short engagement with three of the
enemy's guns posted on the ridge in our front we were advanced, by
order of Brig.-Gen. Thayer, driving the enemy before us, and
forming a new line of battle one-half mile forward, at which place the
enemy opened a most terrific fire of grape and canister on us, killing 1
sergeant and wounding 1 lieutenant and 1 color guard. The regiment
was ordered to lie down, or we could not possibly have escaped as well
as we did. The enemy was again dislodged. Again we advanced, moving
to the right, and forming a new line of battle just under the
brow of hill, within about 150 yards of a large battery of the enemy,
which, owing to our position, did us no harm whatever.

The enemy's guns being silence, we were by Gen. Thayer again
ordered forward, and formed our line in a field, our right resting on the
left of the Twenty-third Indiana. There our regiment opened fire upon
a body of the enemy who were charging on our line and repulsed them.
Again we were ordered forward, and formed a line in a new direction
(the enemy having tried to flank us on our left), opened fire upon the
enemy's forces, who were advancing in support of one of their batteries.
Here we received the most destructive fire that had yet been opened
upon us, losing 3 killed and quite a number wounded, amongst whom
were Capt. McConihe, Lieut.'s Weatherwax, Gillette, Curran, and
a number of our non-commissioned officers and privates. The enemy's
fire was returned until the men became short of ammunition, when we
were relieved by the Seventy-sixth Ohio, Col. Woods, our regiment
marching through his, by the right of companies to the rear into column.
Col. Woods' regiment then took our position, while we retired to a
ravine in our rear and replenished our ammunition. The movements of
both regiments were conducted and executed as orderly as could be done
on the parade ground. After refilling our cartridge-boxes we again
advanced to our old position. My regiment was in the action from 5.30
a. m. until 5 p. m., and I am proud to say that it steadily advanced and
never receded an inch, being at one time alone engaged with one of the
enemy's batteries for about twenty minutes.

I cannot conclude without expressing myself in the warmest terms in
praise of the gallant conduct of the following officers: Maj. R. R.
Livingston; First Lieut. F. L. Cramer, acting adjutant; First
Lieut. N. J. Sharp, commanding, and Second Lieut. J. McF.
Hagood, of Company A; Capt. Baumer, commanding, and First and
Second Lieut.'s Bimmerman and Lubbes, of Company B; Capt.
Maj.'s, commanding, and First and Second Lieut.'s Berger and
Ivory of Company C; First Lieut. Lee P. Gillette, commanding, and
Second Lieut. Provost, Company D; First Lieut. S. M. Curran,
commanding Company E; First Lieut. J. P. Murphy, commanding,
and Second Lieut. Fred. Smith, Company F; Capt. John
McConihe, commanding, and First and Second Lieut.'s Weatherwax
and Hance, Company G; First Lieut. L. M. Sawyer, commanding,
and Second Lieut. Clarke Company H; Second Lieut. Emory
Peck, commanding Company I, and Second Lieut. Edward
Donovan, commanding Company K, together with the non
commissioned officers and privates engaged in this hard-fought battle.
Particularly do I present to your notice Maj. R. R. Livingston, and
First Lieut. F. L. Cramer, acting adjutant of the regiment, whose
efficiency in carrying orders and otherwise aiding me is worthy of all
praise; also Dr. William McClellan, assistant surgeon, who most
promptly and kindly attended to the wounded, rendering them the most
signal service, and receiving all the most glowing encomiums for his
celerity and skill, rendering aid alike to friend and foe.

Our casualties are as follows.*
I have the honor to be, colonel, your most obedient servant.

WM. D. McCORD,
Lieut.-Col., Comdg. First Regiments Nebraska Volunteers.

S. A. STRICKLAND,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-Gen., Second Brigade.

Source: Official Records: Series I. Vol. 10. Part I, Reports. Serial No. 10

**********************************************************************

Report of Col. R. R. Livingston, First Nebraska Infantry, of the pursuit
of Marmaduke.

SAINT LOUIS, April 30., 1863.
CAPT.: Having been instructed, on the night of the 25th instant, by
order (copy of which I inclose, marked A.), to take charge of the
Thirty-seventh Regt. Illinois Volunteer Infantry, Capt. Brown's company (G),
Twenty-third Regiments Missouri Volunteer Infantry, and 20 men, under
Lieut. Ewing, Twenty-third Iowa, to see them shipped without delay to
re-enforce the post of Cape Girardeau, then return to this post immediately
after the attack had ceased, I have the honor to reports as follows;

We arrived at Cape Girardeau on Sunday, 26th instant, at 2.50 p. m., just
as the firing on both sides ceased for that day. I turned over my and was
ordered by him to move with the companies of the Thirty-seventh Illinois
Infantry, under Capt. [Charles W.] Hawes, to report to Lieut.-Col.
[William] Baumer, at Fort B, as the enemy were attempting to flank our
right. Shortly afterward I received an order to take change of my own
regiment; but, finding the conduct of Lieut.-Col. Baumer, of the First
Nebraska, all that could be desired, I, in the spirit of a soldier,
permitted him to retain the command he had fought so gallantly previous to
my arrival. Fearing a night attack, I went with Gen. McNeil, and arranged
a system of signals with two gunboats, then lying in the Mississippi River,
opposite the town, by which they could direct their fire where it would be
most effective. Gen. McNeil, at my suggestion, also sent for
re-enforcements to Gen. Asboth, commanding at Columbus, Ky., whose
promptness in forwarding the troops is deserving of all praise.

When daylight broke, the enemy had not appeared before our pickets,
and two detachments of cavalry were sent out to feel them; but it was
not before 11.30 a. m., the 27th instant, that the retrograde movement
of the enemy toward Bloomfield was definitely ascertained; and at 2 p.
m. two regiments of cavalry (First Wisconsin and Second Missouri),
four guns of Welfley's battery, two mountain howitzers, and two
companies of Col. McLane's Missouri Militia moved out in pursuit,
on the Bloomfield road. Arriving near Black Creek, the advance under
Maj. [William H.] Torrey, First Wisconsin, drove a small force of the
enemy from the bridge, which they had commenced to destroy, by tearing up
plank and piling dry stakes in the bridges, preparatory to firing it. The
bridge was speedily repaired, and we pushed on to the junction of the
Jackson and Bloomfield roads, where was met the advance of General
Vandever's column. There the column halted. Myself and a small party pushed
forward to the bridge across White Water, about 1 1/2 miles distant, and
found the last span destroyed, the stringers being cut, the plank thrown in
the river, and the up-stream post on the last bent cut in such a manner as
to render it useless. To my great surprise, no further progress was made
that day, our forces being ordered into camp at 6 p. m., with a demoralized
and flying enemy only one hour ahead of us.

I left camp the next morning at 7.10 o'clock, at which time our forces
had not yet pushed forward; and feeling convinced that so tardy a
pursuit would certainly be a vain one, I returned to this post with all
dispatch, knowing my services were needed here.

I would respectfully state that the enemy were confident of carrying and
holding Cape Girardeau; that their battle cry was, "Hurrah now for
McNeil!" and that, in their conversations with the peaceful citizens, they
asked if Fayetteville had been attacked, stating that place and the Cape
were to be struck the same time, and that on Sunday, 3d of May next, Price,
with 30,000 men, would attack Jefferson City, after which the forces at
the Cape and that place were to make a combined attack on Saint Louis.

I refrain from giving you the particulars of the battle or the losses on
either side, as competent authority will soon furnish the official report.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. R. LIVINGTON,
Col. 1st Regt. Nebraska Vol. Infty., Cmdg. Post, Saint Louis, Mo.

Capt. H. C. FILLEBROWN,
Assistant Adjutant-Gen., District of Saint Louis, Mo.

[Inclosure A.]

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 91., HDQRS. SAINT LOUIS DISTRICT,
Saint Louis, Mo., April 25, 1863.

* * * * * * *

XVIII. Col. R. R. Livingston, First Nebraska Infantry Volunteers, will
proceed to Cape Girardeau, Mo. He will take command of all troops going
down to that point. Upon his arrival he will turn over the troops to the
command of Brig. Gen. John McNeil.

By order of Brig.-Gen. Davidson;

HENRY C. FILLEBROWN,
Assistant Adjutant-Gen.

Source: Official Records
CHAP. XXXIV.] MARMADUKE'S EXPEDITION INTO MISSOURI. PAGE 266-32
[Series I. Vol. 22. Part I, Reports. Serial No. 32.]
Information provided by @east tennessee roots
Nebraska and the Civil War
Greetings. I read in your post that Col. Robert Ramsey Livingston of the 1st Nebraska Calvary was stations in the Batesville, AR district during November-December 1863. In my Hawkins family genealogy research I read in Col. Williams Monks Book, "A History of Southern Missouri and Northern Arkansas" that my great uncle, John Calvin Hawkins, was captured and executed by firing squad in mid December 1863 in the area around Batesville and Izard County under the direction of Col. Livingston and Col. Monks. Do you have or can you direct me to where I might find detailed information about this execution. I've search ed t official reports of the "War of the Rebellion, the National Archives, and Arkansas civil war archives and found no information. Thank you.
 

TomP

Sergeant
Joined
Sep 29, 2015
Location
Corinth, MS
The 1st Nebraska Infantry at Shiloh. This tablet is off the beaten path.
Corinth_1476.JPG
 

Ole Miss

Captain
Forum Host
Silver Patron
Regtl. Staff Shiloh 2020
Joined
Dec 9, 2017
Location
North Mississippi
The 1st Nebraska Infantry was organized in July of 1861 from the territory and nearby states in response to President Lincoln’s call for 75,000 volunteers. The regiment was soon dispatched to the Army of the Tennessee and participated at Fort Donelson. At Shiloh, the 1st Nebraska was part of General Lew Wallace’s 3rd Division and was engaged on the 2nd day of battle.
Regards
David

Report of Col. John M. Thayer, First Nebraska Infantry, commanding
Second Brigade.
Headquarters Second Brigade, Third Division, Army in the Field, Pittsburg, Tenn, April 10,1862.
"Captain: I have the honor to submit herewith a report of the part taken by the Second Brigade in the battle of Pittsburg:
Early on Sunday morning, the 6th instant, hearing at my camp at Stony Lonesome heavy cannonading in the direction of Pittsburg, I immediately caused my command to be put in state of preparation to march at a moment’s notice, and anxiously awaited orders. Soon Major-General Wallace and staff rode up and he gave me the desired command to move to the scene of action.
At 12 o’clock the brigade was in the line of march, the Sixty-eighth Ohio, Colonel Steedman, being directed by me to remain at that point, in conjunction with Colonel Kinney’s Ohio regiment, for the purpose ox preventing an approach of the enemy by Adamsville road.
We arrived upon the field at Pittsburg at dark, and throwing out a strong force of pickets in front of our line we bivouacked in order of battle, the troops lying down with their arms in their hands.
During the night a severe thunder-storm came on. Those who slept awoke to find themselves in a drenching rain, but they bore their hardships with fortitude and cheerfulness.
Capt. Noah S. Thompson, of the Ninth Battery Indiana Light Artillery, having come up in the night and placed his battery in position in the open field in front, at daylight on the morning of title 7th I moved the First Nebraska, Lieutenant-Colonel McCord, forward, so that its left rested on the battery. I then placed the Twenty-third Indiana, Col. W. L. Sanderson, on the right of the First Nebraska, having the Fifty-eighth Ohio, Colonel Bausenwein, immediately in the rear of the two.
While is this position Thompson’s battery opened fire upon a battery of the enemy, discovered upon the hill directly in front. Having silenced it, I received orders from General Wallace in person to advance en Echelon. I did so across the deep ravine and up the steep declivity where the rebel guns had been planted, keeping Captain Baumer and his company of the First Nebraska as skirmishers in advance, which movement was executed in good order. Here the general directed a change of front of his division, which was executed by a left wheel of the whole line. Advancing in line a short distance, we were soon under a heavy fire of the enemy’s guns, both artillery and infantry. Moving forward we emerged from the timber into a small, cleared field, where Captain Thompson, having moved forward, also planted his battery. I then moved the brigade by the right flank nearly half a mile into the timber again, for the purpose of extending our line to the right, and then forward to the brow of a steep hill, where we remained some three-quarters of an hour, when the enemy’s battery was again silenced.
The order then came from General Wallace to move forward. We did so, and emerged from the timber into a large, open field. Moving my brigade in full line of battle, reserving our fire, we crossed a deep ravine and passed up onto the ridge beyond under a terrible fire of musketry and artillery from the rebels. Arriving on the brow of this ridge I gave the order to open on them, which was promptly done. Our fire told with fatal effect, for they immediately fell back. A few moments previous to this, observing a body of the rebel cavalry advancing on the outskirts of the timber on my extreme right, evidently with the intention of flanking us, I directed Colonel Sanderson, of the Twenty-third Indiana, to move by the right flank some 20 rods, so as to bring his regiment directly in front of them and to drive them back; a movement which he promptly and successfully accomplished. On getting in front of them the cavalry discharged their carbines. The Twenty-third Indiana immediately returned their fire, and under the lead of their colonel then pressed forward, and the right-flank company of the First Nebraska, Captain Baumer, also giving them a right-oblique fire, when the rebels at once fled in confusion. Still fearing a flank movement of the enemy, and observing Colonel Whittlesey coming up with two regiments, I rode to him, and requested him to move as rapidly as possible to my right, which he readily did. The action now became general along the line. I again gave the order “Forward,” and the line advanced as regularly and with a front as unbroken as upon the parade ground, the First Nebraska, Lieutenant-Colonel McCord, moving up directly in front of the enemy’s battery. Advancing about 20 rods and finding the enemy had made another stand, I ordered a halt and directed another fire upon them, which continued some fifteen minutes, when, discovering the enemy again receding, we pushed on nearly half a mile, halting as we ascended the brow of each hill (the ground being composed of hills and valleys) and giving then another volley and then moving forward again.
Perceiving the enemy’s battery again in position, supported by heavy bodies of infantry, another halt was ordered and another fire opened upon them, which became continuous along my whole line. The battle now raged with unabated fury for nearly two hours. The enemy’s battery was exceedingly well served, it having obtained excellent range. I had no artillery to oppose to it, but the fire of our infantry was terrific and incessant and was admirably directed, the men loading and firing at will with great rapidity.
Learning from Colonel McCord and Major Livingston that the ammunition of the First Nebraska was nearly exhausted, and from Major Dister, of the Fifty-eighth Ohio, that theirs also was nearly out, I rode to General Wallace, who was on the left of the division, and requested of him a fresh regiment. He at once ordered forward the Seventy-sixth Ohio, Colonel Woods, which I conducted to my line, and directed the First Nebraska to file by the right of companies to the rear, when the Seventy-sixth took its place. The First Nebraska and the Fifty-eighth Ohio then fell back a few rods to a ravine. These movements were executed with perfect order.
My ammunition wagons having failed to come up on account of the ravines, which were impassable for teams, over which we had crossed, General Wallace sent me one of his own, which fortunately had arrived by another route. The two regiments refilled their cartridge-boxes, and in twenty minutes from the time they left the line they were again in their position before the enemy but the enemy was now fleeing. The general here ordered forward his whole division in pursuit, himself leading it, which was continued for a mile and a half, when we bivouacked for the night. Thus did we drive the enemy before us from 5 o’clock in the morning till 5 o’clock in the evening, never receding an inch, but pressing steadily forward over a distance of 4 miles, the enemy contesting the ground rod by rod with a courage and determination that would have honored a better cause.
I cannot speak in terms of too high praise of the officers and soldiers under my command; their conduct was most gallant and brave throughout. They fought with the ardor and zeal of true patriots.
It gives me pleasure to speak of the different regiments and their officers. Nobly did the First Nebraska sustain its reputation well earned on the field of Donelson. Its progress was onward during the whole day in face of a galling fire of the enemy, moving on without flinching, at one time being an hour and a half in front of their battery receiving and returning its fire. Its conduct was most excellent. Lieut. Col. W. D. McCord and Maj. E. R. Livingston, of this regiment, were constantly in the thickest of the fight, executing every order with the utmost promptness and alacrity. They are deserving of the highest commendation for their gallantry.
The Twenty-third Indiana, by its conduct on the field, won my unqualified admiration. It moved constantly forward under the lead of its brave commander, 0Colonel Sanderson, under a heavy fire, charging upon the enemy’s cavalry" and utterly routing them. The coolness and courage of the colonel aided much in the success of the movements of the brigade. Lieut. Col. D. C. Anthony and Maj. W. P. Davis, of the same regiment, behaved gallantly through the action and were ever at the post of duty. The former had his horse shot under him. The regiment, with its colonel and other officers, have earned distinguished honors for themselves and for the noble State which sent them into the field.
The Fifty-eighth Ohio proved themselves worthy of the confidence reposed in them. They fought with unabated courage during the day, never yielding, but firmly advancing, pressing the enemy before them. They have my highest esteem for their noble conduct in this battle. Colonel Bausenwein, Lieutenant-Colonel Eempel, and Major Dister, of this regiment, were conspicuous for their coolness and bravery throughout the day. Ever exposed to imminent danger, they readily performed every duty and handled their regiment most admirably.
Most honorable mention is due to Surg. E. B. Harrison, of the Sixty-eighth Ohio, surgeon of the brigade, and to William McClellan, assistant surgeon of the First Nebraska, for their prompt attention to the wounded. They labored at the hospitals with ceaseless devotion for days and nights after the battle in administering relief. Their services were invaluable.
I must also express my obligations to the members of my staff—S. A. Strickland, acting assistant adjutant-general; my aides-de-camp, Capt. Allen Blacker and Lieut. William S. Whittin, and also to Lieutenant-Colonel Scott and Captain Richards, of the Sixty-eighth Ohio, and Mr. George E. Spencer, who acted as volunteer aides—for their prompt conveyance and execution of orders in the face of all danger.
I directed the men to lie down when not engaged, and to fire kneeling and lying down as much as possible, and also to take advantage of the ground whenever it could be done. By adopting this course and continuing it throughout the day I have no doubt but that the lives of hundreds of our men were saved.
In conclusion, I may be permitted to congratulate the general upon the part his division took and upon the success which attended all his movements in the memorable battle at Pittsburg.
I have the honor to be, very truly, yours,
JOHN M. THAYER,
Col. 1st Nebr., Comdg. 2d Brig., 3d Div., Army in the Field.
Capt. Fred. Knefler,
Assistant Adjutant-General, Third Division."

Official Records of the Rebellion
Series 1, Volume X, Part 1

Pages 193-195

The 1st Nebraska reached the battlefield about 7 pm on Sunday evening and prepared for fighting on Monday. They were placed on the Union right near Jones Field.
1602780784068-png.png



U. S.
ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE.
Thayer's (2d) Brigade,
1st NEBRASKA, 23d INDIANA,
58th OHIO,
L. Wallace's (3d) Division.
This brigade arrived upon the field about 7 p.m. April
6, 1862. It bivouacked here Sunday night and at
5.30 a.m. next morning, formed with its reg-
iments in order as above, and at 6.30,
advanced to Jones Field.
 

Ole Miss

Captain
Forum Host
Silver Patron
Regtl. Staff Shiloh 2020
Joined
Dec 9, 2017
Location
North Mississippi
Here is the Official Report of Lieutenant Colonel McCord who was actually in charge of the 1st Nebraska in battle as Colonel Thayer was the Brigade commander


Report of Lieut. Col. William D. McCord, First Nebraska Infantry.
Hdqrs. First Regiment Nebraska Volunteers,
In the Field, near Pittsburg, Tenn. April 10,1862.
Captain : I have the honor to present the following report of the part taken by the First Regiment Nebraska Volunteers in the battle of April 7, 1862, at Pittsburg:
On Sunday, April 6, at about 12 o’clock m., my regiment was moved by order of Colonel Thayer from camp 2 miles west of Crump’s Landing, with a view to connect with the forces under General Grant at Pittsburg. We reached the encampment of our troops near Pittsburg about 7 o’clock p. m. Sunday night and bivouacked under a heavy rain-storm. Company G, Captain McConihe commanding, was thrown forward as a picket about 200 yards in advance of the regiment. About 5.30 a. m. the regiment was moved forward in support of Captain Thompson’s Ninth Battery Indiana Light Artillery, occupying a position on its right in an open field immediately in front of a deep ravine and a high ridge beyond. After a short engagement with three of the enemy’s guns posted on the ridge in our front we were advanced, by order of Brigadier-General Thayer, driving the enemy before us, and forming a new line of battle one-half mile forward, at which place the enemy opened a most terrific fire of grape and canister on us, killing 1 sergeant and wounding 1 lieutenant and 1 color guard. The regiment was ordered to lie down, or we could not possibly have escaped as well as we did. The enemy was again dislodged. Again we advanced, moving to the right, and forming a new line of battle just under the brow of a hill, within about 150 yards of a large battery of the enemy, which, owing to our position, did us no harm whatever.
The enemy’s guns being silenced, we were by General Thayer again ordered forward, and formed our line in a field, our right resting on the left of the Twenty-third Indiana. There our regiment opened fire upon a body of the enemy who were charging on our line and repulsed them. Again we were ordered forward, and formed a line in a new direction (the enemy having tried to flank us on our left), and opened fire upon the enemy’s forces, who were advancing in support of one of their batteries. Here we received the most destructive fire that had yet been opened upon us, losing 3 killed and quite a number wounded, amongst whom were Captain McConibe, Lieutenants Weatherwax, Gillette, Curran, and a number of our non-commissioned officers and privates. The enemy’s fire was returned until the men became short of ammunition, when we were relieved by the Seventy-sixth Ohio, Colonel Woods, our regiment marching through his, by the right of companies to the rear into column. Colonel Woods’ regiment then took our position, while we retired to a ravine in our rear and replenished our ammunition. The movements of both regiments were conducted and executed as orderly as could be done on the parade ground. After refilling our cartridge-boxes we again advanced to our old position. My regiment was in the action from 5.30 a. m. until 5 p. m., and I am proud to say that it steadily advanced and never receded an inch, being at one time alone engaged with one of the enemy’s batteries for about twenty minutes.
I cannot conclude without expressing myself in the warmest terms in praise of the gallant conduct of the following officers: Maj. R. R. Livingston; First Lieut. F. L. Cramer, acting adjutant; First Lieut. N. J. Sharp, commanding, and Second Lieut. J. McF. Hagwood, of Company A; Captain Baumer, commanding, and First and Second Lieutenants Bimmerman and Lubbes, of Company B; Captain Majors, commanding, and First and Second Lieutenants Berger and Ivory of Company C; First Lieut. Lee P. Gillette, commanding, and Second Lieutenant Provost, Company D; First Lieut. S. M. Curran, commanding Company E ; First Lieut. J. P. Murphy, commanding, and Second Lieut. Fred. Smith, Company F; Capt. John McConihe, commanding, and First and Second Lieutenants Weatherwax and Hance, Company G; First Lieut. L. M. Sawyer, commanding, and Second Lieutenant Clarke, Company H; Second Lieut. Emory Peck, commanding Company I, and Second Lieut. Edward Donovan, commanding Company K, together with the non commissioned officers and privates engaged in this hard-fought battle. Particularly do I present to your notice Maj. R. R. Livingston, and First Lieut. F. L. Cramer, acting adjutant of the regiment, whose efficiency in carrying orders and otherwise aiding me is worthy of all praise ; also Dr. William McClellan, assistant surgeon, who most promptly and kindly attended to the wounded, rendering them the most signal service, and receiving from all the most glowing encomiums for his celerity and skill, rendering aid alike to friend and foe.*
I have the honor to be, colonel, your most obedient servant,
WM. D. McCORD,
Lieutenant-Colonel, Comdg. First Regt. Nebraska Volunteers.
S. A. Strickland,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, Second Brigade."


Official Records of the Rebellion
Series 1, Volume X, Part 1

Page 197-198

This was the position held by the 1st Nebraska during the most important part of the battle on Monday, April 7.
1602781469589-png.png


U. S.
ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE.
Thayer's (2d) Brigade,
1st NEBRASKA, 23d INDIANA,
58th OHIO.
L. Wallace's (3d) Division.

This brigade was engaged here from about 10 a.m.
to 12 m. April 7, 1862. It then advanced through
the Crescent Field.
 
Top