1st Nebraska Infantry at Shiloh

Ole Miss

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I am always fascinated by the beauty and mystery of the Shiloh National Cemetery and love to walk its grounds looking at the stones and wondering about the life and story of each person lying below the Known and Unknown markers. In one of my wanderings I found the grave of Sergeant N. P. Swiggitt , Company F 1st​ Nebraska Infantry buried in grave #1213 section A and quickly noticed that he was from NEB. I admitted to being completely unfamiliar to what, if any, role Nebraska troops played in the battle of Shiloh and decided to see if I could find any other Nebraska soldiers under the West Tennessee soil far from home. I have posted photographs of the 2 men I discovered buried in the cemetery.
Regards
David

Sergeant N. P. Swiggitt , Company F 1st​ Nebraska Infantry buried in grave #1213 section A. I have been unable to discover any information about Sergeant Swiggitt on Fold3 despite my membership.
1602778689702.png


Private David P. Crawley, a veteran of the Battle of Shiloh, drowned in the Tennessee River on April 15, 1862. Private Crawley is buried in grave #346 in section R.
1602778878752.png
 

huskerblitz

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ucvrelics

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Great post as there are not many troops from Neb. There is a misprint either on his grave or Fold3 records. Attached are his records which show he died from wounds received at the battle of Shiloh.
 

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Ole Miss

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The 1st Nebraska Infantry was organized in July of 1861 from the territory and nearby states in response to President Lincoln’s call for 75,000 volunteers. The regiment was soon dispatched to the Army of the Tennessee and participated at Fort Donelson. At Shiloh, the 1st​ Nebraska was part of General Lew Wallace’s 3rd​ Division and was engaged on the 2nd​ day of battle.
Regards
David

Report of Col. John M. Thayer, First Nebraska Infantry, commanding
Second Brigade.
Headquarters Second Brigade, Third Division, Army in the Field, Pittsburg, Tenn, April 10,1862.
"Captain: I have the honor to submit herewith a report of the part taken by the Second Brigade in the battle of Pittsburg:
Early on Sunday morning, the 6th instant, hearing at my camp at Stony Lonesome heavy cannonading in the direction of Pittsburg, I immediately caused my command to be put in state of preparation to march at a moment’s notice, and anxiously awaited orders. Soon Major-General Wallace and staff rode up and he gave me the desired command to move to the scene of action.
At 12 o’clock the brigade was in the line of march, the Sixty-eighth Ohio, Colonel Steedman, being directed by me to remain at that point, in conjunction with Colonel Kinney’s Ohio regiment, for the purpose ox preventing an approach of the enemy by Adamsville road.
We arrived upon the field at Pittsburg at dark, and throwing out a strong force of pickets in front of our line we bivouacked in order of battle, the troops lying down with their arms in their hands.
During the night a severe thunder-storm came on. Those who slept awoke to find themselves in a drenching rain, but they bore their hardships with fortitude and cheerfulness.
Capt. Noah S. Thompson, of the Ninth Battery Indiana Light Artillery, having come up in the night and placed his battery in position in the open field in front, at daylight on the morning of title 7th I moved the First Nebraska, Lieutenant-Colonel McCord, forward, so that its left rested on the battery. I then placed the Twenty-third Indiana, Col. W. L. Sanderson, on the right of the First Nebraska, having the Fifty-eighth Ohio, Colonel Bausenwein, immediately in the rear of the two.
While is this position Thompson’s battery opened fire upon a battery of the enemy, discovered upon the hill directly in front. Having silenced it, I received orders from General Wallace in person to advance en Echelon. I did so across the deep ravine and up the steep declivity where the rebel guns had been planted, keeping Captain Baumer and his company of the First Nebraska as skirmishers in advance, which movement was executed in good order. Here the general directed a change of front of his division, which was executed by a left wheel of the whole line. Advancing in line a short distance, we were soon under a heavy fire of the enemy’s guns, both artillery and infantry. Moving forward we emerged from the timber into a small, cleared field, where Captain Thompson, having moved forward, also planted his battery. I then moved the brigade by the right flank nearly half a mile into the timber again, for the purpose of extending our line to the right, and then forward to the brow of a steep hill, where we remained some three-quarters of an hour, when the enemy’s battery was again silenced.
The order then came from General Wallace to move forward. We did so, and emerged from the timber into a large, open field. Moving my brigade in full line of battle, reserving our fire, we crossed a deep ravine and passed up onto the ridge beyond under a terrible fire of musketry and artillery from the rebels. Arriving on the brow of this ridge I gave the order to open on them, which was promptly done. Our fire told with fatal effect, for they immediately fell back. A few moments previous to this, observing a body of the rebel cavalry advancing on the outskirts of the timber on my extreme right, evidently with the intention of flanking us, I directed Colonel Sanderson, of the Twenty-third Indiana, to move by the right flank some 20 rods, so as to bring his regiment directly in front of them and to drive them back; a movement which he promptly and successfully accomplished. On getting in front of them the cavalry discharged their carbines. The Twenty-third Indiana immediately returned their fire, and under the lead of their colonel then pressed forward, and the right-flank company of the First Nebraska, Captain Baumer, also giving them a right-oblique fire, when the rebels at once fled in confusion. Still fearing a flank movement of the enemy, and observing Colonel Whittlesey coming up with two regiments, I rode to him, and requested him to move as rapidly as possible to my right, which he readily did. The action now became general along the line. I again gave the order “Forward,” and the line advanced as regularly and with a front as unbroken as upon the parade ground, the First Nebraska, Lieutenant-Colonel McCord, moving up directly in front of the enemy’s battery. Advancing about 20 rods and finding the enemy had made another stand, I ordered a halt and directed another fire upon them, which continued some fifteen minutes, when, discovering the enemy again receding, we pushed on nearly half a mile, halting as we ascended the brow of each hill (the ground being composed of hills and valleys) and giving then another volley and then moving forward again.
Perceiving the enemy’s battery again in position, supported by heavy bodies of infantry, another halt was ordered and another fire opened upon them, which became continuous along my whole line. The battle now raged with unabated fury for nearly two hours. The enemy’s battery was exceedingly well served, it having obtained excellent range. I had no artillery to oppose to it, but the fire of our infantry was terrific and incessant and was admirably directed, the men loading and firing at will with great rapidity.
Learning from Colonel McCord and Major Livingston that the ammunition of the First Nebraska was nearly exhausted, and from Major Dister, of the Fifty-eighth Ohio, that theirs also was nearly out, I rode to General Wallace, who was on the left of the division, and requested of him a fresh regiment. He at once ordered forward the Seventy-sixth Ohio, Colonel Woods, which I conducted to my line, and directed the First Nebraska to file by the right of companies to the rear, when the Seventy-sixth took its place. The First Nebraska and the Fifty-eighth Ohio then fell back a few rods to a ravine. These movements were executed with perfect order.
My ammunition wagons having failed to come up on account of the ravines, which were impassable for teams, over which we had crossed, General Wallace sent me one of his own, which fortunately had arrived by another route. The two regiments refilled their cartridge-boxes, and in twenty minutes from the time they left the line they were again in their position before the enemy but the enemy was now fleeing. The general here ordered forward his whole division in pursuit, himself leading it, which was continued for a mile and a half, when we bivouacked for the night. Thus did we drive the enemy before us from 5 o’clock in the morning till 5 o’clock in the evening, never receding an inch, but pressing steadily forward over a distance of 4 miles, the enemy contesting the ground rod by rod with a courage and determination that would have honored a better cause.
I cannot speak in terms of too high praise of the officers and soldiers under my command; their conduct was most gallant and brave throughout. They fought with the ardor and zeal of true patriots.
It gives me pleasure to speak of the different regiments and their officers. Nobly did the First Nebraska sustain its reputation well earned on the field of Donelson. Its progress was onward during the whole day in face of a galling fire of the enemy, moving on without flinching, at one time being an hour and a half in front of their battery receiving and returning its fire. Its conduct was most excellent. Lieut. Col. W. D. McCord and Maj. E. R. Livingston, of this regiment, were constantly in the thickest of the fight, executing every order with the utmost promptness and alacrity. They are deserving of the highest commendation for their gallantry.
The Twenty-third Indiana, by its conduct on the field, won my unqualified admiration. It moved constantly forward under the lead of its brave commander, 0Colonel Sanderson, under a heavy fire, charging upon the enemy’s cavalry" and utterly routing them. The coolness and courage of the colonel aided much in the success of the movements of the brigade. Lieut. Col. D. C. Anthony and Maj. W. P. Davis, of the same regiment, behaved gallantly through the action and were ever at the post of duty. The former had his horse shot under him. The regiment, with its colonel and other officers, have earned distinguished honors for themselves and for the noble State which sent them into the field.
The Fifty-eighth Ohio proved themselves worthy of the confidence reposed in them. They fought with unabated courage during the day, never yielding, but firmly advancing, pressing the enemy before them. They have my highest esteem for their noble conduct in this battle. Colonel Bausenwein, Lieutenant-Colonel Eempel, and Major Dister, of this regiment, were conspicuous for their coolness and bravery throughout the day. Ever exposed to imminent danger, they readily performed every duty and handled their regiment most admirably.
Most honorable mention is due to Surg. E. B. Harrison, of the Sixty-eighth Ohio, surgeon of the brigade, and to William McClellan, assistant surgeon of the First Nebraska, for their prompt attention to the wounded. They labored at the hospitals with ceaseless devotion for days and nights after the battle in administering relief. Their services were invaluable.
I must also express my obligations to the members of my staff—S. A. Strickland, acting assistant adjutant-general; my aides-de-camp, Capt. Allen Blacker and Lieut. William S. Whittin, and also to Lieutenant-Colonel Scott and Captain Richards, of the Sixty-eighth Ohio, and Mr. George E. Spencer, who acted as volunteer aides—for their prompt conveyance and execution of orders in the face of all danger.
I directed the men to lie down when not engaged, and to fire kneeling and lying down as much as possible, and also to take advantage of the ground whenever it could be done. By adopting this course and continuing it throughout the day I have no doubt but that the lives of hundreds of our men were saved.
In conclusion, I may be permitted to congratulate the general upon the part his division took and upon the success which attended all his movements in the memorable battle at Pittsburg.
I have the honor to be, very truly, yours,
JOHN M. THAYER,
Col. 1st Nebr., Comdg. 2d Brig., 3d Div., Army in the Field.
Capt. Fred. Knefler,
Assistant Adjutant-General, Third Division."

Official Records of the Rebellion
Series 1, Volume X, Part 1

Pages 193-195

The 1st Nebraska reached the battlefield about 7 pm on Sunday evening and prepared for fighting on Monday. They were placed on the Union right near Jones Field.
1602780784068.png


U. S.
ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE.
Thayer's (2d) Brigade,
1st NEBRASKA, 23d INDIANA,
58th OHIO,
L. Wallace's (3d) Division.
This brigade arrived upon the field about 7 p.m. April
6, 1862. It bivouacked here Sunday night and at
5.30 a.m. next morning, formed with its reg-
iments in order as above, and at 6.30,
advanced to Jones Field.
 
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huskerblitz

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1st Nebraska Infantry​

1st Nebraska Infantry[1]

Killed:
John Raggensack (B), Sergeant W.P. Swiggett (F), Sergeant James E. Cox (H) and Corporal John Benson Thompson (I).


Wounded:
William H. Bates (A), Algernon H. Pratt (A), James S. Sweine (A), Albert E. Tegrio (A), Corporal Henry Buhren (B), John Hanson (B), Mathew Meryen (B), Chase (C), Curtis (C), Corporal James C. Miller (C), Corporal William H. Tucker (C), First Lieutenant Lee P. Gillett (D), Second Lieutenant Charles Provost (D), First Lieutenant S.M. Curran (E), Charles Dunk (E), J.R. Hutton (E), Sergeant Reeves (E), F. Rittenhouse (E), J. Scoles (F), Smith P. Tuttle (F), Captain John McConihe (G), First Lieutenant T.J. Weatherwax (G), John Beard (H) and Levi Sager (H).


[1] Reports of Officers in Relation to a Recent Battle at Pittsburg Landing. Millwood, NY: Kraus Reprint, 1977. Originally published as U.S. 37th Congress, 2nd session, 1861-1862. Senate. Executive Documents Printed by Order of the Senate of the United States for the Second Session of the Thirty-Seventh Congress, 1861-62. 6 vols. Washington D.C., 1861. pp 68-9



 

Ole Miss

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Here is the Official Report of Lieutenant Colonel McCord who was actually in charge of the 1st Nebraska in battle as Colonel Thayer was the Brigade commander


Report of Lieut. Col. William D. McCord, First Nebraska Infantry.
Hdqrs. First Regiment Nebraska Volunteers,
In the Field, near Pittsburg, Tenn. April 10,1862.
Captain : I have the honor to present the following report of the part taken by the First Regiment Nebraska Volunteers in the battle of April 7, 1862, at Pittsburg:
On Sunday, April 6, at about 12 o’clock m., my regiment was moved by order of Colonel Thayer from camp 2 miles west of Crump’s Landing, with a view to connect with the forces under General Grant at Pittsburg. We reached the encampment of our troops near Pittsburg about 7 o’clock p. m. Sunday night and bivouacked under a heavy rain-storm. Company G, Captain McConihe commanding, was thrown forward as a picket about 200 yards in advance of the regiment. About 5.30 a. m. the regiment was moved forward in support of Captain Thompson’s Ninth Battery Indiana Light Artillery, occupying a position on its right in an open field immediately in front of a deep ravine and a high ridge beyond. After a short engagement with three of the enemy’s guns posted on the ridge in our front we were advanced, by order of Brigadier-General Thayer, driving the enemy before us, and forming a new line of battle one-half mile forward, at which place the enemy opened a most terrific fire of grape and canister on us, killing 1 sergeant and wounding 1 lieutenant and 1 color guard. The regiment was ordered to lie down, or we could not possibly have escaped as well as we did. The enemy was again dislodged. Again we advanced, moving to the right, and forming a new line of battle just under the brow of a hill, within about 150 yards of a large battery of the enemy, which, owing to our position, did us no harm whatever.
The enemy’s guns being silenced, we were by General Thayer again ordered forward, and formed our line in a field, our right resting on the left of the Twenty-third Indiana. There our regiment opened fire upon a body of the enemy who were charging on our line and repulsed them. Again we were ordered forward, and formed a line in a new direction (the enemy having tried to flank us on our left), and opened fire upon the enemy’s forces, who were advancing in support of one of their batteries. Here we received the most destructive fire that had yet been opened upon us, losing 3 killed and quite a number wounded, amongst whom were Captain McConibe, Lieutenants Weatherwax, Gillette, Curran, and a number of our non-commissioned officers and privates. The enemy’s fire was returned until the men became short of ammunition, when we were relieved by the Seventy-sixth Ohio, Colonel Woods, our regiment marching through his, by the right of companies to the rear into column. Colonel Woods’ regiment then took our position, while we retired to a ravine in our rear and replenished our ammunition. The movements of both regiments were conducted and executed as orderly as could be done on the parade ground. After refilling our cartridge-boxes we again advanced to our old position. My regiment was in the action from 5.30 a. m. until 5 p. m., and I am proud to say that it steadily advanced and never receded an inch, being at one time alone engaged with one of the enemy’s batteries for about twenty minutes.
I cannot conclude without expressing myself in the warmest terms in praise of the gallant conduct of the following officers: Maj. R. R. Livingston; First Lieut. F. L. Cramer, acting adjutant; First Lieut. N. J. Sharp, commanding, and Second Lieut. J. McF. Hagwood, of Company A; Captain Baumer, commanding, and First and Second Lieutenants Bimmerman and Lubbes, of Company B; Captain Majors, commanding, and First and Second Lieutenants Berger and Ivory of Company C; First Lieut. Lee P. Gillette, commanding, and Second Lieutenant Provost, Company D; First Lieut. S. M. Curran, commanding Company E ; First Lieut. J. P. Murphy, commanding, and Second Lieut. Fred. Smith, Company F; Capt. John McConihe, commanding, and First and Second Lieutenants Weatherwax and Hance, Company G; First Lieut. L. M. Sawyer, commanding, and Second Lieutenant Clarke, Company H; Second Lieut. Emory Peck, commanding Company I, and Second Lieut. Edward Donovan, commanding Company K, together with the non commissioned officers and privates engaged in this hard-fought battle. Particularly do I present to your notice Maj. R. R. Livingston, and First Lieut. F. L. Cramer, acting adjutant of the regiment, whose efficiency in carrying orders and otherwise aiding me is worthy of all praise ; also Dr. William McClellan, assistant surgeon, who most promptly and kindly attended to the wounded, rendering them the most signal service, and receiving from all the most glowing encomiums for his celerity and skill, rendering aid alike to friend and foe.*
I have the honor to be, colonel, your most obedient servant,
WM. D. McCORD,
Lieutenant-Colonel, Comdg. First Regt. Nebraska Volunteers.
S. A. Strickland,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, Second Brigade."


Official Records of the Rebellion
Series 1, Volume X, Part 1

Page 197-198

This was the position held by the 1st Nebraska during the most important part of the battle on Monday, April 7.
1602781469589.png

U. S.
ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE.
Thayer's (2d) Brigade,
1st NEBRASKA, 23d INDIANA,
58th OHIO.
L. Wallace's (3d) Division.

This brigade was engaged here from about 10 a.m.
to 12 m. April 7, 1862. It then advanced through
the Crescent Field.



 

Ole Miss

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@huskerblitz I am pleased you are able to provide additional informtion about this little known unit that was involved in serious fighting on the right flank of the Union on the second day.
Somehow the 1st Nebraska, and other 3rd Division regiments, were lost in the kerfuffle dealing with Lew Wallace's decision about which route to use in closing on the battlefield that fateful Sunday.
I hope you have additional information to share about this regiment and its valiant members.
Regards
David
 

James N.

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Unfortunately I didn't take any photos there, but during our catered box lunch at the Shiloh NMP picnic grounds I strolled out to look at the oval Union tablets there. They were for two regiments of one of Lew Wallace's brigades that were positioned there for a time on April 7 and I was astounded to see the 1st Nebraska Regiment included. That was my introduction to Cornhuskers at Shiloh!

Edit: I believe there are more than one tablet for each of these regiments, showing their advance over the course of the day.
 
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huskerblitz

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Unfortunately I didn't take any photos there, but during our catered box lunch at the picnic grounds I strolled out to look at the oval Union tablets there. They were for two regiments of one of Lew Wallace's brigades that were positioned there for a time on April 7 and I was astounded to see the Nebraska regiment included. That was my introduction to Cornhuskers at Shiloh!

Edit: I believe there are more than one tablet for each of these regiments, showing their advance over the course of the day.
I only recall seeing the one. I must have missed the other...shoot.

Shiloh was the last major engagement for the 1st Nebraska. They participated at Fort Henry and Fort Donelson, then Shiloh, then ultimately sent further west and spent a decent amount of time in Arkansas. Then 1864 hit and the natives were restless. The regiment was changed to a cavalry unit and Kansas-Nebraska was where many were sent after that until the end of the war.
 

Ole Miss

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James N. here is the tablet you mentined that was in the picinic area.

@huskerblitz if you go to the NPS website, Shiloh Monument Finder, you may see all the tablets for the 1st Nebraska and all the other units that fought at Shiloh

Regards
David

1602785125350.png

U. S.
ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE.
Thayer's (2d) Brigade,
1st NEBRASKA, 23d INDIANA,
58th OHIO.
L. Wallace's (3d) Division.
This brigade was engaged here from about 10 a.m.
to 12 m. April 7, 1862. It then advanced through
the Crescent Field.

The NPS Shiloh Monument Finder website
http://www.shilohbattlefield.org/unitsearch.html
 

Sbc

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I am always fascinated by the beauty and mystery of the Shiloh National Cemetery and love to walk its grounds looking at the stones and wondering about the life and story of each person lying below the Known and Unknown markers. In one of my wanderings I found the grave of Sergeant N. P. Swiggitt , Company F 1st​ Nebraska Infantry buried in grave #1213 section A and quickly noticed that he was from NEB. I admitted to being completely unfamiliar to what, if any, role Nebraska troops played in the battle of Shiloh and decided to see if I could find any other Nebraska soldiers under the West Tennessee soil far from home. I have posted photographs of the 2 men I discovered buried in the cemetery.
Regards
David

Sergeant N. P. Swiggitt , Company F 1st​ Nebraska Infantry buried in grave #1213 section A. I have been unable to discover any information about Sergeant Swiggitt on Fold3 despite my membership.
View attachment 378438

Private David P. Crawley, a veteran of the Battle of Shiloh, drowned in the Tennessee River on April 15, 1862. Private Crawley is buried in grave #346 in section R.
View attachment 378439
Nice find
 
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