1st Louisiana Infantry (Regulars) (Strawbridge's)

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The 1st Louisiana Infantry (Regulars) was organized on 5 February 1861 as a Louisiana State Army unit, before being transferred to Confederate service on 13 March, numbering 860 men, under the command of Colonel Adley H. Gladden. In early April it received orders to report for duty at Pensacola, but the governor called upon volunteer units to reinforce it for this mission as only Companies A, B, and C had finished recruiting by this point. Five volunteer companies were added and the regiment then moved to Pensacola, where it spent the next several weeks drilling. The remaining companies of the 1st Louisiana Infantry (Regulars) reported to Pensacola by late May, after which the volunteer companies became the 1st Louisiana Infantry Battalion and left for Virginia. The regiment continued drilling for the rest of the year, and its companies rotated through the duty of manning the heavy artillery batteries surrounding Pensacola. Gladden was promoted to brigade command on 10 September and was replaced by Lieutenant Colonel (simultaneously promoted to colonel) Daniel W. Adams. Two companies fought at Santa Rosa Island between 8 and 9 October, and the regiment fought in the defense of Fort McRae and Fort Barrancas between 22 and 23 November after they were bombarded from Fort Pickens by the Federals.

It was ordered to Corinth, Mississippi, on 26 February 1862, joining Gladden's Brigade (later the First Brigade) of Jones Withers' Division of Polk's I Corps in the Army of the Mississippi. At Corinth, the reportedly mainly Irish men of the regiment became drunk on whiskey, which they had not been able to get access to at Pensacola, according to an account by J.E. Carraway of the 19th Louisiana. During a Federal expedition towards Purdy, Tennessee, the regiment occupied the former between 9 and 14 March. Near Yellow Creek between 14 and 15 March, a detachment from the regiment repulsed a Federal force marching towards the Memphis and Charleston Railroad. The 1st Louisiana Regulars fought at Shiloh, and suffered heavy casualties in the opening attack on 6 April, leaving only 101 men present for duty by the end of the day. Gladden was mortally wounded and was replaced in command of the brigade by Adams, who had lost an eye while leading the regiment in a charge. It then participated in operations around Corinth between 29 April and 11 June, retreating with the army to Tupelo. Adams was promoted to brigadier general on 23 May and replaced by former Lieutenant Colonel John A. Jacques. After Braxton Bragg led the army by rail to Chattanooga via Mobile in July, the Louisianans marched with the army's wagon trains overland to Chattanooga.

The regiment was part of Withers' division in the Confederate invasion of Kentucky between 28 August and 19 October. The division marched to support other Confederate troops near Lexington on 7 October, and thus missed Perryville on the next day. The regiment retreated with the army and camped at Tullahoma, Tennessee, participating in the attack at Stones River between 31 December and 2 January 1863, losing 102 men killed, wounded, or missing. Among the casualties was mortally wounded regimental commander Lt. Col. Fred H. Farrar, who died on 3 January. The regiment was put on provost duty on 10 January. Jacques was cashiered after a court martial on 13 February 1863 and replaced by former Lieutenant Colonel James Strawbridge. It supported the army's reserve artillery in the spring and summer of 1863, and was temporarily consolidated with the 8th Arkansas Infantry on 25 August before it fought at Chickamauga between 19 and 20 September. Having less than 100 men present, it served as the army's headquarters guard during the Chattanooga Campaign; by January 1864 it had only 57 effectives. Strawbridge unsuccessfully requested that Adjutant General Samuel Cooper send the regiment back to Louisiana to recruit, though by April the regiment mustered 100 effectives. The regiment remained in this post at Dalton, Georgia, during the early spring of 1864, and were assigned to Randall L. Gibson's Louisiana brigade on 16 April.

With Gibson's Brigade, the regiment participated in the Atlanta Campaign between May and July, though it saw little combat until Ezra Church on 28 July. It then participated in the invasion of Tennessee, fighting at Nashville between 15 and 16 December. After the retreat from Tennessee the brigade withdrew to Mobile, Alabama, in February 1865. At Mobile, the regiment was consolidated with the 16th and 20th Louisiana Infantry Regiments and the 4th Louisiana Infantry Battalion under the 16th Louisiana's Lieutenant Colonel Robert Lindsey. It fought at Spanish Fort between 27 March and 8 April before surrendering at Gainesville, Alabama on 12 May. During the war, it lost 176 men in battle, 52 to disease, two by accident, one murdered, and two executed.


References
Bergeron, Arthur W. Guide to Louisiana Confederate Military Units, 1861–1865. Louisiana State University Press, 1996. pp. 70–71
Hewitt, Lawrence Lee, and Bergeron, Arthur W., eds. Confederate Generals in the Western Theatre, Volume 3. University of Tennessee Press, 2010.

Salling, Steward. Louisianians in the Western Confederacy: The Adams-Gibson Brigade in the Civil War. McFarland, 2010.

This thread is intended to serve as the location for general regimental history, photographs, stories, articles and any other relevant information about the 1st Louisiana Infantry (Regulars) (Strawbridge's) in the Regimental Histories Forum. Please do not start new threads - just add your content about the regiment under this existing thread so others can easily find it. Thank you so much for contributing information for this regiment. (Disclaimer borrowed from @AUG351)
 
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Feb 3, 2018
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Colonels: Adley H. Gladden, promoted brigadier general September 10, 1861; Daniel W. Adams, promoted brigadier general May 23, 1862; John A. Jacques, cashiered February 13, 1863; James Strawbridge.

Lieutenant Colonels: Daniel W. Adams, promoted colonel September 10,1861; John A. Jacques, promoted colonel May 23,1862; Fred H. Farrar, Jr., died January 3, 1863; James Strawbridge, promoted colonel February 13, 1863; F.M. Kent, died April 2, 1864; S. S. Batchelor.

Majors: Charles M. Bradford, resigned July 23, 1861; John A. Jacques, promoted lieutenant colonel September 10, 1861; Fred H. Farrar, Jr., promoted lieutenant colonel May 23,1862; James Strawbridge, promoted lieutenant colonel January 3, 1863; F.M. Kent, promoted lieutenant colonel February 16, 1863; S. S. Batchelor, promoted lieutenant colonel April 2, 1864; Douglas West.


Companies and Commanders (from Bergeron)
Company A. Fred H. Farrar, Jr., promoted major September 10, 1861; Taylor Beatty, resigned February 13, 1863; W. A. Reid.

Company B. John A. Jacques, transferred to Company D; Thomas Overton, resigned May 21, i861; P.H. Thompson, resigned February 24, 1862; James Cooper.

Company C. F. M. Kent, promoted major January 6,1863; Charles H. Tew.

Company D. John A. Jacques, promoted major August 23, 1861; James H. Trezevant.

Company E. William H. Scott, died December 18, 1861; Edward C. Preston, absent; Thomas Butler.

Company F. James Strawbridge, promoted major May 23, 1862; James W. Stringfellow.

Company G. J. Thomas Wheat, killed April 6, 1862; William H. Sparks, killed July 28,1864; J. C. Stafford(?).

Company H. S. S. Batchelor, promoted major February 16, 1863; Charles H. Tew.

Company I. Douglas West, promoted major April 2, 1864; J.C. Stafford.

Company K. Charles Taylor, died May 8, 1863; Robert C. Kennedy.
 
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Luke Freet

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Im confused by the naming of this regiment.
What made it a "regular" regiment? Was it meant to be a standing regiment for postwar? Was it an example regiment? Or just a title to excuse having multiple 1st Louisiana Regiments?
I know there are 3 1st Georgia Regiments: 1st Volunteers, 1st Confederate, and 1st Regular. Wasn't any major organizational differences that i could tell between them otherwise
 
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Im confused by the naming of this regiment.
What made it a "regular" regiment? Was it meant to be a standing regiment for postwar? Was it an example regiment? Or just a title to excuse having multiple 1st Louisiana Regiments?
I know there are 3 1st Georgia Regiments: 1st Volunteers, 1st Confederate, and 1st Regular. Wasn't any major organizational differences that i could tell between them otherwise

I assume the regular units was raised with the intent of being part of ACSA, The Army of the Confederate States of America and/or as part of a future regular state army, as seems to be the case with the 1st Louisiana Regulars..
Maybe someone else can provide more info about this?
ACSA was supposed to be the regular Confederate Army, as opposed to the Provisional Army (PACS), which was to be disbanded if the south won the war. ACSA was authorized to have about 15.000 menn, but it existed only on paper.

What seems to be the case with many Regular state units, is that they where raised before the Confederate War department was authorized to call for volunteers for service, and the volunteer regiments was raised.
The 1st Georgia Regulars was formed in March 1861 and the 1st South Carolina Regulars in January 1861 etc.
 

Luke Freet

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Forum Host
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I assume the regular units was raised with the intent of being part of ACSA, The Army of the Confederate States of America and/or as part of a future regular state army, as seems to be the case with the 1st Louisiana Regulars..
Maybe someone else can provide more info about this?
ACSA was supposed to be the regular Confederate Army, as opposed to the Provisional Army (PACS), which was to be disbanded if the south won the war. ACSA was authorized to have about 15.000 menn, but it existed only on paper.

What seems to be the case with many Regular state units, is that they where raised before the Confederate War department was authorized to call for volunteers for service, and the volunteer regiments was raised.
The 1st Georgia Regulars was formed in March 1861 and the 1st South Carolina Regulars in January 1861 etc.
U know, u maybe right.
BTW, 1st SC Regulars, havent heard much on them. Were they garrison troops at Charleston or something
 
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BTW, 1st SC Regulars, havent heard much on them. Were they garrison troops at Charleston or something

Yes, various assignments around Charleston until they joined the Army of Tennessee in time for the Carolina's campaign. Btw, two companies participated in the defense of Fort Wagner.
 

AUG

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I've wondered about this myself but never really found a sure answer, though I think it might've had something to do with their original organization and term of enlistment within state service.

There were actually four 1st South Carolina infantry regiments: the Regulars (aka Butler's), Gregg's, Hagood's, and Orr's Rifles.

The first to be called for by the state in December 1860 were the Regulars for 12 months' service and Gregg's Volunteers for 6 months.

Then, shortly thereafter that December, volunteers for twelve months' service were called for and Hagood's regiment was organized. Orr's Rifles were organized later, in July 1861.

All except for Orr's Rifles started out in state service, but were eventually transferred to Confederate service and reorganized for longer terms of enlistment. And all except for the Regulars went on to fight in the ANV.

So perhaps they were "Regulars" within state service and just maintained that designation after transferring to C.S. service.
 
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Yes correct @AUG , and i definitely think regulars probably ment within state service, as a regular state Army, but it never took effect and they where transferred to Confederate service..

Just a little additional info to avoid confusion. Maxcy Greggs regiment was the 1st SC Provisional Army and the 1st SC Regulars was initially R.H. Andersons regiment (and later Butlers).

Gotta love all those 1st's . Can be really confusing at times.
 

ariete

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and they called confusion the 1861's numerical designation adopted by the state of New York for its units and militias !
 
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ariete

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source : ‘irish-american units in the civil war’ men at arms 448, Osprey publishing

In the western theater, Louisiana units also contained large numbers of irish americans. At least a quarter of the 1st Louisiana regular infantry (raised in february 1861 in New Orleans) was irish, with heavy concentrations in cos C,E,F and G. This regiment served with the army of Tennessee and suffered consistently heavy losses at Shiloh, Stones river, and Chickamauga (where it served in Govan’s brigade, Liddell’s division of the reserve corps). Early in 1861 the 1st regulars received a regimental uniform from the state: dark blue nine-button frock coats, dark blue pants with yellow cords and dark blue kepis, generally similar to the US dress uniform. Their fatigue dress included dark blue five-button shell jackets. Arms in 1862 were .58cal rifled muskets and .69cal smoothbore muskets.
 
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Coming back to this, Bergeron does say the regiment was initially part of the "Louisiana State Army," so perhaps 'Regulars' distinguished them as members of an active force rather than state militiamen.
 
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I think I've found the definitive answer. In Mutiny at Fort Jackson, Michael D. Pierson describes the 1st Louisiana Heavy Artillery (Regulars) as part of Louisiana's attempt to create a mini-version of the US Regular Army by enlisting men for three years' service instead of the Louisiana volunteers' one year and imposing stricter discipline, as well as appointing officers rather than allowing their election. Unsurprisingly, it appears that the 1st Louisiana Regulars of Infantry, the 1st Louisiana Heavy Artillery, and the 1st Louisiana Regulars Battery were the only regular units raised. The ordinance establishing the Louisiana State Army, published in the New Orleans Crescent, is below:
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farrargirl

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Baldwin County, on the Alabama Gulf Coast
Here is my 2 cents on my ancestor, Lt. Col. Frederick Hillsman Farrar. This comes from one of our Farrar family newsletters, and the death date of the 6th is from his CSR’s. A note: His only brother, Lieut.Thomas Prince Farrar, of the 6th Louisiana Reg.was shot in the Battle of Port Republic on 9 June, furloughed home, and died in hospital six months later.

6BFB1CF6-A050-4D1F-9A2C-E3F5BE0B9AAC.jpeg
 

ssalling

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Here is my 2 cents on my ancestor, Lt. Col. Frederick Hillsman Farrar. This comes from one of our Farrar family newsletters, and the death date of the 6th is from his CSR’s. A note: His only brother, Lieut.Thomas Prince Farrar, of the 6th Louisiana Reg.was shot in the Battle of Port Republic on 9 June, furloughed home, and died in hospital six months later.

View attachment 366997
What an OUTSTANDING photograph of Frederick Hillsman Farrar Jr. Wish I had ran across that photograph before 2010 to use in Louisianians in the Western Confederacy. Perhaps in the updated version one day???
 

farrargirl

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What an OUTSTANDING photograph of Frederick Hillsman Farrar Jr. Wish I had ran across that photograph before 2010 to use in Louisianians in the Western Confederacy. Perhaps in the updated version one day???
Well sure, glad you like it. Are you familiar with the specifics of the 6th La. Regiment, and even more specifically, with their part in the battles around Port Republic? I know they were involved with the AofNV, and your book is about the Western campaigns, right?
 

ssalling

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Well sure, glad you like it. Are you familiar with the specifics of the 6th La. Regiment, and even more specifically, with their part in the battles around Port Republic? I know they were involved with the AofNV, and your book is about the Western campaigns, right?

Yes my book is on the Louisiana Brigade that fought out west (Shiloh, Perryville, Murfreesboro, Jackson, Chickamauga, Chattanooga, Atlanta, Nashville, and Mobile). I'm somewhat familiar with the 6th Louisiana in the ANV. I've been working on another project on the 8th Louisiana Infantry which fought along with 6th La. Both regiments had companies from a town I lived in for many years, Opelousas, La.
 

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