What is this? Breechldrs 1860(?) Spencer Carbine

Joined
Sep 24, 2020
Hello!
I've been a longtime lurker and finally pulled the trigger and joined up. I have a few questions regarding a Spencer Carbine I purchased very recently and I was wondering if anyone would be able to help me figure this out.

I saw this Spencer at a gun show and I absolutely had to pick it up. Mechanically there is nothing wrong with it however it suffers from severe pitting. This is making it fairly hard for me to figure out if it is an 1860 model or an 1865. It seems to be an 1860 due to the 22" barrel and the smooth loading tube plate however it has a Stabler Cutoff installed and 1865 model sights. I understand that 1860s converted post-war have cartouches from certain inspectors on them however there are none whatsoever on my carbine.

There are a couple identifying marks that survive, the serial number is just barely able to be made out as 15211 and there is a "C.G.C" marking on the stock. My understanding is the inspector with those initials inspected Henry rifles during the war, could he have still inspected this carbine? Or could that mark be foreign? Attached are pictures of the markings (Or lack thereof). Thank you all in advance! I'm looking forward to learning something new! Who knows what this Carbine saw throughout the years?

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Story

Sergeant Major
Joined
Aug 5, 2011
Location
SE PA
There are a couple identifying marks that survive, the serial number is just barely able to be made out as 15211 and there is a "C.G.C" marking on the stock.

@plymouthairrifle

 
Last edited:
Joined
May 1, 2015
Location
Upstate N.Y.
"C.G.C." stands for inspector Charles G. Curtis. He inspected--Colt's, Remington's, Pettingill, Bridesburg, Henry, but no listings for Spencer's. The wood appears way to fresh in comparison with the metal. There is no Stabler Cutoff shown in the photos. Stabler was similar looking to a wingnut. It would be in front of the trigger. The smooth end of the loading tube indicates 1860. There looks to be an extra screw head showing on the right side of the lock plate. Check out some of the auction sights for photos to compare against yours.
Some info on Spencer-- https://americansocietyofarmscollec...2019/06/2011-B103-Spencer-Sporting-Rifles.pdf
 
Last edited:
Joined
Sep 24, 2020
"C.G.C." stands for inspector Charles G. Curtis. He inspected--Colt's, Remington's, Pettingill, Bridesburg, Henry, but no listings for Spencer's. The wood appears way to fresh in comparison with the metal. There is no Stabler Cutoff shown in the photos. Stabler was similar looking to a wingnut. It would be in front of the trigger. The smooth end of the loading tube indicates 1860. There looks to be an extra screw head showing on the right side of the lock plate. Check out some of the auction sights for photos to compare against yours.
Some info on Spencer-- https://americansocietyofarmscollec...2019/06/2011-B103-Spencer-Sporting-Rifles.pdf
Yeah, I'm looking around but I can't seem to find a Spencer with that extra screw in the Lockplate. Odd. I'm hoping that coupled with the stock which you're making me think is a replacement or not original I didn't walk right into picking up a fake. I'm very new to repeating rifles, I should have probably done more homework.
 
Joined
Sep 24, 2020
No worries, you're calling it as you see it. I appreciate it. It's a learning experience. Like you said, I'll wait for a second opinion before deciding to return it. I have their info from the show and the payment processor, if needed I can drive it to them.
 
Joined
May 1, 2015
Location
Upstate N.Y.
Books or at very least search on line and look at auction and dealer listings. That way if something is strange you will research before purchasing. There are others on here who will give their take on it. The overall appearance would be your first question. Good luck, don't stop collecting
 

Jeff in Ohio

Corporal
Joined
Oct 17, 2015
As you likely know, the hammer is a model 1865 hammer - but lots of those were installed on 1860s that were refurbished for Indian War use. But the top of the frame does NOT have the beveled edges on top that were on the 1865 models and ground into the 1860 models refurbished so that a soldier could load a single cartridge one at a time through the top.
The wood is much too good to have been on this carbine during the time it was used (or that pitting in the metal happened).
So, I would say this is a mix-master Spencer put together with parts of various ages and from various sources.
 

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