16th Alabama information

Georgia

Sergeant
Hello,
Does anyone here gave specific information or interest in the 16th Alabama Infantry, Company E ?

One of my ancestors is believed to have perished during this battle. (His brother actually was a Union Cavalry member of the 1st Alabama Cavalry. Both were from Northern Alabama.)

Peter N. Shotts shows an enlistment date on 9/1 and mustered in at Knoxville on 10/26 of ‘61.

Are there any specifics or information concerning the battle which might shed light on where he could have been and any more information?
Thanks so much-
 

ucvrelics

Lt. Colonel
Forum Host
Regtl. Quartermaster Shiloh 2020
Joined
May 7, 2016
Location
Alabama
Hello,
Does anyone here gave specific information or interest in the 16th Alabama Infantry, Company E ?

One of my ancestors is believed to have perished during this battle. (His brother actually was a Union Cavalry member of the 1st Alabama Cavalry. Both were from Northern Alabama.)

Peter N. Shotts shows an enlistment date on 9/1 and mustered in at Knoxville on 10/26 of ‘61.

Are there any specifics or information concerning the battle which might shed light on where he could have been and any more information?
Thanks so much-
This should help shed some light on him.

 

Fairfield

First Sergeant
Joined
Dec 5, 2019
@Georgia: I hope that you read this before it is pulled for its length. However, if not, message me and I'll repeat.

Confederate Military History, vol. VIII, p. 106

The Sixteenth Alabama infantry was organized at Courtland,August,
1861.

It was assigned to General Zollicoffer's brigade, and its first
battle was at Fishing Creek or Mill Spring, Ky., January 19 and
20, 1862. It was at Shiloh, April 6th and 7th; Triune, December
27th; Murfreesboro, December 31 to January 2, 1863; in the
retreat from Tullahoma to Chattanooga, June 23rd to July 4th;
Chickamauga, September 19th and 20th; Missionary Ridge, November
23rd to 25th; Ringgold, November 27th; in all the great battles
under Johnston and Hood during the eventful campaign in 1864, and
was particularly distinguished at Jonesboro, August 31st and
September 1st, where it met with very severe loss.

It participated in the fights at Buzzard Roost, Tunnel Hill and
Rocky Face Ridge, February 25 to 27, 1864; around Dalton, May 8th
to 12th; Resaca, May 13th to 16th; Adairsville, May 17th;
Cassville, May 19th to 22nd; Pickett's Mill, May 27th; Kenesaw
Mountain, June 9th to 30th; Peachtree Creek, July 20th; Atlanta,
July 22nd, where it carried the enemy's works by assault and
captured two stands of colors.

It was also prominent in the battle of Franklin, November 30th,
and of Nashville, December 15th and 16th.

Among the distinguished killed were its very gallant colonels,
Fred A. Ashford and Brice Wilson at Franklin, Maj. J. H.
McGaughey at Chickamauga, Capt. Robert M. Gregor at Nashville,
Lieut. Wm. A. Patton at Shiloh, Lieuts. David E. Bentley, R. W.
Garland, Lewis E. Jackson, Robt. W. Roebuck and Benj. H. Russell
at Murfreesboro. Col. William B. Wood, who afterward became
eminent on the bench as circuit judge, was the first colonel. He
was succeeded by Cols. Alexander H. Helvenston and Frederick A.
Ashford. I ts lieutenant colonels were John H. McGaughey, Joseph
J. May and John W. Harris.
----------
Shiloh after battle report:

Official Records: Series I. Vol. 10. Part I, Reports. Serial No. 10

Report of Lieut. Col. John W. Harris, Sixteenth Alabama Infantry.

HDQRS. SIXTEENTH REGT. ALABAMA VOLUNTEERS, Near
Corinth, Miss., April 8, 1862.

At 4 o'clock on the morning of April 3 I received orders from Gen.
Hindman, through Col. Patterson, commanding First Brigade, to
prepare five days' rations and be ready to march by 6 o'clock, but was
not ordered off until 11 a.m. Owing to indisposition and prostration of
the physical system I was not able to go with the regiment, so Maj.
Helvenston took command and marched in the direction of Pittsburg, on
the Tennessee River.

On Friday morning Gen. Wood rejoined his brigade, and Friday
evening the regiments were halted to rest, when firing was heard in
advance. By orders from Gen. Wood, Maj. Helvenston threw the
regiment into line of battle and awaited the attack of the enemy.

Hence, about dark, Maj. Helvenston marched, under orders, and
formed a new line half a mile to the right, and remained under arms
until 2 o'clock Saturday morning, when the line of march was resumed
and continued until 8 o'clock. Then the regiment was again thrown into
line of battle, with Col. Williams' on its left and Col. McKoin's
on its right, and marched for a short distance and halted. Here I joined
the regiment, having heard a fight was expected and being anxious to be
with my men in the engagement.

They remained under arms at this point until early Sunday morning,
when it was advanced in line of battle, with Maj. Hardcastle's battalion
in front as skirmishers.

Sharp skirmishes were kept up until the camps of the enemy were
reached, at 9 o'clock. My regiment advanced through a thick patch of
briers and then through an open field, while a battery of the enemy over
the crest of a hill on my left played upon the troops advancing
on my right. I was halted in a skirt of woods by the battery, and was
immediately ordered to charge and take it. I threw my regiment into
column by division, left in front, preparatory to making the charge, but
the regiment on my right having fallen back, I was ordered to wheel into
line and engage the advancing foe. I did so, and the enemy were
repulsed. I then advanced about 300 yards, when I was informed by
Lieut. A. Adjutant that I was flanked on my left. I sent him to report
it to Gen. Wood. The general ordered that I change my front and
engage the flankers. I did so promptly, and fired for about twenty-five
or thirty minutes. The enemy being protected by a hill and skirt of
woods in his front, I was ordered to charge. I did so, and the enemy
was driven from the field with considerable loss. I was then ordered to
charge a battery in front. I communicated this to my men. They
advanced firmly and steadily under a galling fire from the supporters off
the battery. I drove the enemy back and took and held the battery.

At this time my ammunition gave out, and I had to retire to obtain a
new supply. I was then separated from the brigade; but being desirous
that my regiment should assist in driving the ruthless invader from our
sacred soil, I advanced to a position on the right, of where I had just
engaged the enemy. While advancing through a thicket of underwood I
suddenly came upon a masked battery directly in front and supported by
a large force. Being overpowered, I was compelled to retreat. The
retreat, however, was conducted in good order, and I awaited the arrival
of Col. Shaver, commanding Gen. Hindman's brigade, and
formed upon the right of Col. McKoin's, who also joined Col.
Shaver and advanced with him until he engaged the enemy, and I was
separated from his command. Thinking I did not have sufficient force
to engage the enemy, I took position in the rear to await orders to join
some command.

Soon I was ordered by Lieut. L. A. McClung to go as a guard with
Federal prisoners just taken. I guarded them 5 miles, and was relieved
on the morning of the 7th instant, and ordered back by Gen. Wood
to the battle field to rejoin him on the left. On my way Gen.
Cheatham's aide-de-camp came to me and reported that they were
flanked on the right and the general ordered me to that position. He
urged the necessity of the case in such strong terms that I obeyed his
order. I took position and fired upon the enemy a few moments, when
a charge was ordered. My regiment charged with Gen. Cheatham's
command, and the enemy was driven back. A flank movement on the
right compelled our troops to retire from the field. I halted, after
retreating about 300 yards, formed my regiment, and engaged the enemy
again until an overwhelming force flanked me on the right and forced
me to retreat. This was the last of the engagement in which my regiment
participated.

Gen., I must say, in conclusion, that my men fought gallantly,
bravely, and with a determination that insures certain victory. They
stood firm and fought like veterans to the last. I was greatly assisted by
Maj. Helvenston on the right, and I am indebted to him for many noble
acts of daring and intrepidity-always at his post and at all times cheering
on the soldiers. While gallantly charging a battery, at the head of the
column, he received a wound in the left thigh, which disabled him for
the remained of the day. His horse fell under him at the same time.

Capt. Ashford, Company B, also acted nobly. At one time, when our
forces were driven back, one piece of a battery was left by the gunners
and drivers, the lead horse having been shot; Capt. Ashford
went to the piece, under the enemy's fire, cut the traces of the dead
horse, ordered two men near by to assist him, and drove it away,
preventing its capture by the enemy.

Lieut. William A. Patton, Company C, while at his post and
encouraging his men to their duty, fell, facing the foe. His untimely fate
is deeply deplored.

Respectfully,

J. W. HARRIS,
Lieut. Col., Cmdg. Sixteenth Regt. Alabama Vols.
 

Georgia

Sergeant
@Georgia: I hope that you read this before it is pulled for its length. However, if not, message me and I'll repeat.

Confederate Military History, vol. VIII, p. 106

The Sixteenth Alabama infantry was organized at Courtland,August,
1861.

It was assigned to General Zollicoffer's brigade, and its first
battle was at Fishing Creek or Mill Spring, Ky., January 19 and
20, 1862. It was at Shiloh, April 6th and 7th; Triune, December
27th; Murfreesboro, December 31 to January 2, 1863; in the
retreat from Tullahoma to Chattanooga, June 23rd to July 4th;
Chickamauga, September 19th and 20th; Missionary Ridge, November
23rd to 25th; Ringgold, November 27th; in all the great battles
under Johnston and Hood during the eventful campaign in 1864, and
was particularly distinguished at Jonesboro, August 31st and
September 1st, where it met with very severe loss.

It participated in the fights at Buzzard Roost, Tunnel Hill and
Rocky Face Ridge, February 25 to 27, 1864; around Dalton, May 8th
to 12th; Resaca, May 13th to 16th; Adairsville, May 17th;
Cassville, May 19th to 22nd; Pickett's Mill, May 27th; Kenesaw
Mountain, June 9th to 30th; Peachtree Creek, July 20th; Atlanta,
July 22nd, where it carried the enemy's works by assault and
captured two stands of colors.

It was also prominent in the battle of Franklin, November 30th,
and of Nashville, December 15th and 16th.

Among the distinguished killed were its very gallant colonels,
Fred A. Ashford and Brice Wilson at Franklin, Maj. J. H.
McGaughey at Chickamauga, Capt. Robert M. Gregor at Nashville,
Lieut. Wm. A. Patton at Shiloh, Lieuts. David E. Bentley, R. W.
Garland, Lewis E. Jackson, Robt. W. Roebuck and Benj. H. Russell
at Murfreesboro. Col. William B. Wood, who afterward became
eminent on the bench as circuit judge, was the first colonel. He
was succeeded by Cols. Alexander H. Helvenston and Frederick A.
Ashford. I ts lieutenant colonels were John H. McGaughey, Joseph
J. May and John W. Harris.
----------
Shiloh after battle report:

Official Records: Series I. Vol. 10. Part I, Reports. Serial No. 10

Report of Lieut. Col. John W. Harris, Sixteenth Alabama Infantry.

HDQRS. SIXTEENTH REGT. ALABAMA VOLUNTEERS, Near
Corinth, Miss., April 8, 1862.

At 4 o'clock on the morning of April 3 I received orders from Gen.
Hindman, through Col. Patterson, commanding First Brigade, to
prepare five days' rations and be ready to march by 6 o'clock, but was
not ordered off until 11 a.m. Owing to indisposition and prostration of
the physical system I was not able to go with the regiment, so Maj.
Helvenston took command and marched in the direction of Pittsburg, on
the Tennessee River.

On Friday morning Gen. Wood rejoined his brigade, and Friday
evening the regiments were halted to rest, when firing was heard in
advance. By orders from Gen. Wood, Maj. Helvenston threw the
regiment into line of battle and awaited the attack of the enemy.

Hence, about dark, Maj. Helvenston marched, under orders, and
formed a new line half a mile to the right, and remained under arms
until 2 o'clock Saturday morning, when the line of march was resumed
and continued until 8 o'clock. Then the regiment was again thrown into
line of battle, with Col. Williams' on its left and Col. McKoin's
on its right, and marched for a short distance and halted. Here I joined
the regiment, having heard a fight was expected and being anxious to be
with my men in the engagement.

They remained under arms at this point until early Sunday morning,
when it was advanced in line of battle, with Maj. Hardcastle's battalion
in front as skirmishers.

Sharp skirmishes were kept up until the camps of the enemy were
reached, at 9 o'clock. My regiment advanced through a thick patch of
briers and then through an open field, while a battery of the enemy over
the crest of a hill on my left played upon the troops advancing
on my right. I was halted in a skirt of woods by the battery, and was
immediately ordered to charge and take it. I threw my regiment into
column by division, left in front, preparatory to making the charge, but
the regiment on my right having fallen back, I was ordered to wheel into
line and engage the advancing foe. I did so, and the enemy were
repulsed. I then advanced about 300 yards, when I was informed by
Lieut. A. Adjutant that I was flanked on my left. I sent him to report
it to Gen. Wood. The general ordered that I change my front and
engage the flankers. I did so promptly, and fired for about twenty-five
or thirty minutes. The enemy being protected by a hill and skirt of
woods in his front, I was ordered to charge. I did so, and the enemy
was driven from the field with considerable loss. I was then ordered to
charge a battery in front. I communicated this to my men. They
advanced firmly and steadily under a galling fire from the supporters off
the battery. I drove the enemy back and took and held the battery.

At this time my ammunition gave out, and I had to retire to obtain a
new supply. I was then separated from the brigade; but being desirous
that my regiment should assist in driving the ruthless invader from our
sacred soil, I advanced to a position on the right, of where I had just
engaged the enemy. While advancing through a thicket of underwood I
suddenly came upon a masked battery directly in front and supported by
a large force. Being overpowered, I was compelled to retreat. The
retreat, however, was conducted in good order, and I awaited the arrival
of Col. Shaver, commanding Gen. Hindman's brigade, and
formed upon the right of Col. McKoin's, who also joined Col.
Shaver and advanced with him until he engaged the enemy, and I was
separated from his command. Thinking I did not have sufficient force
to engage the enemy, I took position in the rear to await orders to join
some command.

Soon I was ordered by Lieut. L. A. McClung to go as a guard with
Federal prisoners just taken. I guarded them 5 miles, and was relieved
on the morning of the 7th instant, and ordered back by Gen. Wood
to the battle field to rejoin him on the left. On my way Gen.
Cheatham's aide-de-camp came to me and reported that they were
flanked on the right and the general ordered me to that position. He
urged the necessity of the case in such strong terms that I obeyed his
order. I took position and fired upon the enemy a few moments, when
a charge was ordered. My regiment charged with Gen. Cheatham's
command, and the enemy was driven back. A flank movement on the
right compelled our troops to retire from the field. I halted, after
retreating about 300 yards, formed my regiment, and engaged the enemy
again until an overwhelming force flanked me on the right and forced
me to retreat. This was the last of the engagement in which my regiment
participated.

Gen., I must say, in conclusion, that my men fought gallantly,
bravely, and with a determination that insures certain victory. They
stood firm and fought like veterans to the last. I was greatly assisted by
Maj. Helvenston on the right, and I am indebted to him for many noble
acts of daring and intrepidity-always at his post and at all times cheering
on the soldiers. While gallantly charging a battery, at the head of the
column, he received a wound in the left thigh, which disabled him for
the remained of the day. His horse fell under him at the same time.

Capt. Ashford, Company B, also acted nobly. At one time, when our
forces were driven back, one piece of a battery was left by the gunners
and drivers, the lead horse having been shot; Capt. Ashford
went to the piece, under the enemy's fire, cut the traces of the dead
horse, ordered two men near by to assist him, and drove it away,
preventing its capture by the enemy.

Lieut. William A. Patton, Company C, while at his post and
encouraging his men to their duty, fell, facing the foe. His untimely fate
is deeply deplored.

Respectfully,

J. W. HARRIS,
Lieut. Col., Cmdg. Sixteenth Regt. Alabama Vols.
Thank you so much- any info concerning Company E? Or, would you be able to share where I might go for such information? I have ancestry but not fold 3.
 

ucvrelics

Lt. Colonel
Forum Host
Regtl. Quartermaster Shiloh 2020
Joined
May 7, 2016
Location
Alabama
Thank you so much- any info concerning Company E? Or, would you be able to share where I might go for such information? I have ancestry but not fold 3.
Not much on Co. E or Shotts in Fold3
 

Attachments

  • Shotts, Peter N.pdf
    308.7 KB · Views: 7

Fairfield

First Sergeant
Joined
Dec 5, 2019
Thank you so much- any info concerning Company E? Or, would you be able to share where I might go for such information? I have ancestry but not fold 3.
Afraid not...but I don't have Fold3 either. I found information on individual Maine companies by Googling the unit, the company name and the specific battle. Also, you might try Googling his name; I did and came up with at least one tree (which I have little faith in)--but it may have specific information. Or the name of his town + "history" (local historians like to brag about local heroes).
 

Fairfield

First Sergeant
Joined
Dec 5, 2019
https://e6.evakino.ru/5 is a PDF file. It consists of 3 pages (the first 2 are probably information you already have). But the third gives sources--including relevant holdings at the National Archives. NARA has an online presence as well as contact information for email requests (I've used it for Maine and found it helpful).
 

Georgia

Sergeant
https://e6.evakino.ru/5 is a PDF file. It consists of 3 pages (the first 2 are probably information you already have). But the third gives sources--including relevant holdings at the National Archives. NARA has an online presence as well as contact information for email requests (I've used it for Maine and found it helpful).
Finding a dead link - is there perhaps more to the address?
So wish Daddy was able to discuss this find. I don’t believe he knew this and it would have interested him so much.
 

Fairfield

First Sergeant
Joined
Dec 5, 2019
Finding a dead link - is there perhaps more to the address?
So wish Daddy was able to discuss this find. I don’t believe he knew this and it would have interested him so much.
On my computer, PDF files come up in the top line, right hand side--above the blank screen. There is a small arrow (pointing downwards): click on that and the screen will fill. Unfortunately, you'll have to enlarge the size which means that you'll have to shift from side-to-side in order to see everything. I can't copy a PDF file but I may be able to take a screen shot. Let me know!
 

Fairfield

First Sergeant
Joined
Dec 5, 2019
Here is what I could pull down:


Branch: Confederate Army
Served for: United States of America
Publication Number: M311
Publication Title: Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of
Alabama
Nara Catalog Id: 586957
Nara Catalog Title: Carded Records Showing Military Service of Soldiers Who Fought in Confederate Organizations ,
compiled 1903 - 1927, documenting the period 1861 - 1865
Medium Description: These records contain card abstracts of entries relating to each soldier as found in original muster
rolls, returns, rosters, payrolls, appointment books, hospital registers, Union prison registers and
rolls, parole rolls, and inspection reports. They may also contain the originals of any papers relating
solely to a particular soldier. Browse by military unit, then name of soldier, or use the search box
related to this title.
Publication Browse Title: Civil War Service Records (CMSR) - Confederate - Alabama
Publisher: NARA
Record Group: 109
Short Description: NARA M311. Compiled service records of Confederate soldiers from Alabama units, labeled with
each soldier's name, rank, and unit, with links to revealing documents about each soldier.
State: Alabama
Original data from: The National Archives (http://www.archives.gov

I'd say that you ought to check the NARA site--get the catalog to its collections. It might be worthwhile to check "Battle of Shiloh" and see what's there.
 

Georgia

Sergeant
It may be that I’m trying to access it via phone. I’ll get the laptop up and going and see. Please don’t bother with sending a screenshot as it most likely would be taken down.
( I lost an evening’s -hours-worth of data I had found and was sharing with a person on the forum who is doing his thesis on Lee. I thought I had done the correct thing by giving the locations of the information with the screen shots and found out the hard way that wasn’t the correct way to go about it. We live in the country and I rely upon my cell phone for much of my research as the mifi Internet is reserved for my husband’s needs as he is working from home these days.
I had shared the info on posts, as screen shots so the OP could determine if the points would be helpful as they were primary sources which showed the opposite of the way the thread had begun and showed the name of Lee’s overseer was not the name given by the enslaved Norris who had been involved within a smear campaign of Lee. I’d even found a photo of him and family names which I’d hoped might be helpful in determining what sort of individual he might’ve been- ethical or otherwise. I ended up needing to delete my screenshots as my phone was full due to work requirements but, I knew I could always reference back at the posts. Hours later, a moderator removed all the research and deleted it due to copyright issues. Since the OP was needing info to begin his research for a scholastic use I thought it was ok to share in this fashion. Live and learn.)

I greatly appreciate all your help and will definitely be following up on it as soon as I’m able to spare “real internet” for my laptop. :smile:
 

lelliott19

Brigadier General
Moderator
Forum Host
Silver Patron
Joined
Mar 15, 2013
I hope that you read this before it is pulled for its length.
Since there seems to be some real confusion about moderator edits and fair use standards -- just to clarify, the personal compositions of members - essays, analysis, opinions, reviews, etc. are not limited to any certain length. Items in the 'public domain' can be freely shared -also in any quantity/length, by photo, snip, transcription ---- even by screenshare (as long as the source website is not copyrighted.)

Books published prior to 1925 are public domain as well as news articles published in the United States before 1923. You can reprint or republish them in any form you'd like without any copyright concerns at all. Items from the Federal Government including the The War of the Rebellion: a compilation of the Official Records; materials from the National Park Service, National Archives, etc. are all public domain. Anything from the Library of Congress including maps and pictures from the website (LOC) are all in the public domain.

Clement A Evans' Confederate Military History, Volume VIII was published in 1899 so it is Public Domain. If you'd like, you can take pictures of the whole book and post them here. Or screenshot the whole book and post it - as long as the source is not copyrighted. You can of course always link to any source - here's Volume 8 in its entirety.

Modern newpaper articles, modern books, and website posts from other websites/blogs are limited to "fair use" standards. The same standards apply to screenshots as to other methods of posting. If you think the contents of your post might be limited by fair use standards, please post only a couple of paragraphs and then link to the rest of the content OR don't post it at all and just post a link to it. Unless a member reports it, it's not likely that a moderator will even see it to remove it. And the person posting it is equally liable for copyright infringement as CivilWarTalk.
 
Last edited:

Fairfield

First Sergeant
Joined
Dec 5, 2019
Since there seems to be some real confusion about moderator edits and fair use standards -- just to clarify, the personal compositions of members - essays, analysis, opinions, reviews, etc. are not limited to any certain length. Items in the 'public domain' can be freely shared -also in any quantity/length. Books published prior to 1925 are public domain as well as news articles published in the United States before 1923. You can reprint or republish them in any form you'd like without any copyright concerns at all. Items from the Federal Government including the The War of the Rebellion: a compilation of the Official Records; materials from the National Park Service, National Archives, etc. are all public domain. Anything from the Library of Congress including maps and pictures from the website (LOC) are all in the public domain.

Modern, copyrighted articles and/or items shared from copyrighted websites are limited to "fair use" standards. The same standards apply to screenshots as to other methods of posting. If you think the contents of your post might be limited by fair use standards, please don't post it at all. Unless a member reports it, it's not guaranteed that a moderator will see it to remove it. And the person posting it is equally liable for copyright infringement as CivilWarTalk.
Thank you. However, considering that the section you cite was written in the mid 1800's, I think it's ok.
 

lelliott19

Brigadier General
Moderator
Forum Host
Silver Patron
Joined
Mar 15, 2013
Thank you. However, considering that the section you cite was written in the mid 1800's, I think it's ok.
Yes, I actually went back and edited my post while you were typing and added this:
Clement A Evans' Confederate Military History, Volume VIII was published in 1899 so it is Public Domain. If you'd like, you can take pictures of the whole book and post them here. Or screenshot the whole book and post it - as long as the source website is not copyrighted. You can of course always link to any source - here's Volume 8 in its entirety.
 

lelliott19

Brigadier General
Moderator
Forum Host
Silver Patron
Joined
Mar 15, 2013
Thank you so much- any info concerning Company E?
I see that you located the thread on the 16th Alabama in the Regimental Histories sub-Forum

Regarding specific information on Company E, from the book "Early Settlers of Alabama", by Col. James Edmonds Saunders, originally published in 1899:

COMPANY E. - Was from Franklin county. Its first captain was W. W. Weatherford, a son of John Weatherford, a former sheriff of Franklin County. Captain Weatherford was practicing medicine in Frankford when the war commenced. He served faithfully for about two years, and then resigned. He did not have a liberal education, but was a man of extensive reading and good memory. "He was very tall and ungainly, even awkward, and from the peculiar attitude he assumed when standing, the boys nicknamed him 'Parade Rest.' He was a kind-hearted, generous man, esteemed by the people, and elected a member of the Legislature in 1876." He has been dead for several years. Israel P. Guy, First Lieutenant of Company E, is the son of Albert Guy, near Tuscumbia, and is still living at that place. He was a student at LaGrange, a military college, and was well drilled. Although quite young when he volunteered, he was large and fat. He made a good officer. He was severely wounded at the battle of Chickamauga, by a grape shot, and it took a long crucial incision to remove it. There was a Lieutenant Russell in the company, who was killed at the battle of Murfreesboro, about 10 o'clock in the forenoon, while charging a battery.

A transcription of Saunders' complete sketch of the regiment is located here http://www.trackingyourroots.com/data/16ala.htm

As far as I know, none of the companies of the 16th Alabama were ever sent on detached duty for any significant length of time, so the history of the regiment, should accurately reflect the History of Company E. The national archives has this record of the officers of Company E on file.
1605468364108.png


Also, from the National Archives, the Captions and Record of Events for Company E, 16th AL
1605468534330.png

1605468581771.png

1605468601648.png
1605468623658.png
 

16thAL

Corporal
Asst. Regtl. Quartermaster Shiloh 2020
Joined
Oct 17, 2019
Location
Corinth MS
Hello,
Does anyone here gave specific information or interest in the 16th Alabama Infantry, Company E ?

One of my ancestors is believed to have perished during this battle. (His brother actually was a Union Cavalry member of the 1st Alabama Cavalry. Both were from Northern Alabama.)

Peter N. Shotts shows an enlistment date on 9/1 and mustered in at Knoxville on 10/26 of ‘61.

Are there any specifics or information concerning the battle which might shed light on where he could have been and any more information?
Thanks so much-
Company E was from Franklin county . I have multiple relatives including a GgGf from that company . 16th's biggest engagements were Shiloh and Chicamagua .
 

Georgia

Sergeant
Company E was from Franklin county . I have multiple relatives including a GgGf from that company . 16th's biggest engagements were Shiloh and Chicamagua .
Thank you so much. My ancestor was killed on the second day of Shiloh. He enlisted on 9/1/61 and mustered in on 9/21/61 in Knoxville and was gone by April 7th.
He was only 19 and from Marion County, Alabama.
 
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