154 years after Battle of Nashville, Ft. Negley now faces another battle

USS ALASKA

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154 years after Battle of Nashville, Ft. Negley now faces another battle
By: Linda Ong
Posted: Sep 06, 2018 10:50 AM CDT
Updated: Sep 06, 2018 12:25 PM CDT


NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) - Two miles south of downtown, Ft. Negley once stood as the centerpiece of the Union's occupation of Nashville during the Civil War.

Built by both free and enslaved African Americans, it later protected the city during the Battle of Nashville.

More than 150 years later, yet another battle, pitting preservation against development.

  • For Gary Burke, stepping onto Ft. Negley is a reminder of slavery's painful past.

    "Even out of that series of degradation for many people in the U.S., they were able to overcome that, and became soldiers and fight for their freedom," said Burke.

    It's this sense of pride Burke had been sharing with others at the fort as a Civil War reenactor.

    Six years later in 2007, he had a life-changing discovery.

    "At first, I wept," said Burke.
  • Burke's own blood, his great-great-grandfather, Peter Bailey, was a member of Company K of the U.S. Colored Troops.

    He was stationed at Ft. Negley.

    "It's a full circle moment to find out, just gave more dignity to the 10,133 men of color who served in Tennessee," said Burke.

    But preserving this history hit a roadblock when efforts to turn the fort into a national military park failed.

    In 1928, the city of Nashville purchased the site.

    Over the decades, the fort was reconstructed and restored into Ft. Negley Park.

    But a new battle began in 2017.
  • Developers, with the support of then-Nashville mayor Megan Barry, proposed building a mixed-use development on a dilapidated 21 acres bordering the fort - Greer Stadium.

    Building Ft. Negley was three months of intense labor.

    The stone was quarried locally and built by the hands of more than 2,700 African American laborers who sought protection in Nashville.

    Many of them died because of harsh conditions.

    In January, an archeological firm found that human remains of the laborers are highly likely under at least part of the fort at Greer Stadium.

    The plans were withdrawn after that discovery.

    "They were working here almost like slaves," said Clay Bailey, President of Friends of Ft. Negley, which advocates to protect and preserve the fort. "Yet the fundamental difference they realized was that what they were working on would lead to their emancipation."

    Those behind the proposal meant the group was working against big names in real estate and music, like T Bone Burnett.

    Bailey said there were moments of doubt.

    "Yeah, we wondered if we could many any headway at all," said Bailey.

    But they did.

    In March, Mayor David Briley vowed to reincorporate the stadium back into Ft. Negley Park.

    "This is a moment, a place, where we begin to acknowledge, and atone and seek reconciliation," said Briley.

    The plan going forward is two-fold.

    First, demolish the stadium and seed grass on the site.

    Second, design a green space reflecting the history of the fort.

    "There might be some kind of water feature," said Bailey.

    Other ideas include themed play spaces after the Civil War, a memorial trail to honor the African American laborers, even a U.S. Colored Troops Institute.

    The design would be based on a cultural landscape survey, currently in the works.

    "We want people leaving this site saying, 'Wow! I didn't realize that' because it's a place where people can experience epiphanies," said Bailey.

    "Right now, we're just telling stories," said Burke. "We need something for the future."

    One-million dollars in Metro's reserve funds would pay for the demolition and seeding.

    But funding the master design plan is still up in the air.

    The Metro Parks Department told News 2 solicitation packages for the demolition and the archeological oversight projects are currently being developed.

Full article with video and pics can be found here - https://www.wkrn.com/news/154-years...ft-negley-now-faces-another-battle/1420394408

Cheers,
USS ALASKA
 

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USS ALASKA

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Fort Negley...

Nashville begins demolishing abandoned Greer Stadium
Yihyun Jeong, Nashville Tennessean
Published 4:20 p.m. CT April 9, 2019

Work at the abandoned Greer Stadium has begun with demolition to be on track for July, with plans to incorporate the site into the campus of the Civil War-era Fort Negley historic site.

Mayor David Briley has announced that work is cranking up at the former ballpark with abatement work and waste removal underway. After demolition, archaeologists will excavate the site for historical interpretation.

The project, officials say, hopes to yield a better understanding of the role African Americans played in building the fort. Crews will analyze the areas outside the fort's walls where the African-American community that constructed and maintained the fort were camped and potentially buried during the Civil War.

"Fort Negley is a historic treasure, and we need to recognize what it means and the scars it left in our community while embracing its bright future," Briley said.

“Fort Negley and the area surrounding it represent an incredible opportunity to better tell the story of the American Civil War, Reconstruction and the profound contributions of African-Americans to our city and nation through that period of our history," he said.

Full article can be found here - https://www.tennessean.com/story/news/2019/04/09/greer-stadium-demolition-fort-negly/3415441002/
262

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USS ALASKA
 

scone

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Been there but its been a while … Local yes like Franklin and Spring hill others … African American and white Citizens worked some forced others volunteered... they could Shell the city or the surrounding area … no tour guide my self but lot see can point you in the right direction
 

James N.

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Been there but its been a while … Local yes like Franklin and Spring hill others … African American and white Citizens worked some forced others volunteered... they could Shell the city or the surrounding area … no tour guide my self but lot see can point you in the right direction
My first visit back around 1987 was truly atrocious - the city had allowed it to grow up to such an extent that I couldn't tell a thing about what I was looking at, not even outlines of the ruined works. I said at the time it was like touring Japanese bunkers in a jungle on some deserted Pacific island!
 
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154 years after Battle of Nashville, Ft. Negley now faces another battle
By: Linda Ong
Posted: Sep 06, 2018 10:50 AM CDT
Updated: Sep 06, 2018 12:25 PM CDT


NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) - Two miles south of downtown, Ft. Negley once stood as the centerpiece of the Union's occupation of Nashville during the Civil War.

Built by both free and enslaved African Americans, it later protected the city during the Battle of Nashville.

More than 150 years later, yet another battle, pitting preservation against development.
  • For Gary Burke, stepping onto Ft. Negley is a reminder of slavery's painful past.

    "Even out of that series of degradation for many people in the U.S., they were able to overcome that, and became soldiers and fight for their freedom," said Burke.

    It's this sense of pride Burke had been sharing with others at the fort as a Civil War reenactor.

    Six years later in 2007, he had a life-changing discovery.

    "At first, I wept," said Burke.

  • Burke's own blood, his great-great-grandfather, Peter Bailey, was a member of Company K of the U.S. Colored Troops.

    He was stationed at Ft. Negley.

    "It's a full circle moment to find out, just gave more dignity to the 10,133 men of color who served in Tennessee," said Burke.

    But preserving this history hit a roadblock when efforts to turn the fort into a national military park failed.

    In 1928, the city of Nashville purchased the site.

    Over the decades, the fort was reconstructed and restored into Ft. Negley Park.

    But a new battle began in 2017.

  • Developers, with the support of then-Nashville mayor Megan Barry, proposed building a mixed-use development on a dilapidated 21 acres bordering the fort - Greer Stadium.

    Building Ft. Negley was three months of intense labor.

    The stone was quarried locally and built by the hands of more than 2,700 African American laborers who sought protection in Nashville.

    Many of them died because of harsh conditions.

    In January, an archeological firm found that human remains of the laborers are highly likely under at least part of the fort at Greer Stadium.

    The plans were withdrawn after that discovery.

    "They were working here almost like slaves," said Clay Bailey, President of Friends of Ft. Negley, which advocates to protect and preserve the fort. "Yet the fundamental difference they realized was that what they were working on would lead to their emancipation."

    Those behind the proposal meant the group was working against big names in real estate and music, like T Bone Burnett.

    Bailey said there were moments of doubt.

    "Yeah, we wondered if we could many any headway at all," said Bailey.

    But they did.

    In March, Mayor David Briley vowed to reincorporate the stadium back into Ft. Negley Park.

    "This is a moment, a place, where we begin to acknowledge, and atone and seek reconciliation," said Briley.

    The plan going forward is two-fold.

    First, demolish the stadium and seed grass on the site.

    Second, design a green space reflecting the history of the fort.

    "There might be some kind of water feature," said Bailey.

    Other ideas include themed play spaces after the Civil War, a memorial trail to honor the African American laborers, even a U.S. Colored Troops Institute.

    The design would be based on a cultural landscape survey, currently in the works.

    "We want people leaving this site saying, 'Wow! I didn't realize that' because it's a place where people can experience epiphanies," said Bailey.

    "Right now, we're just telling stories," said Burke. "We need something for the future."

    One-million dollars in Metro's reserve funds would pay for the demolition and seeding.

    But funding the master design plan is still up in the air.

    The Metro Parks Department told News 2 solicitation packages for the demolition and the archeological oversight projects are currently being developed.

Full article with video and pics can be found here - https://www.wkrn.com/news/154-years...ft-negley-now-faces-another-battle/1420394408

Cheers,
USS ALASKA
First the fort was not built by slaves but by free blacks ,then it was a Union fort, and now Northern developers want the land that the fort sets one.Does any one see the humor in this?Then if one views the story of such historical places,they have been removed due to the progress of certain areas ,battlefields have main highways and commercial buildings .Towns are willing to surrender historical buildings and lands for in the name of growth.and,more tax revenue,not considering what may be loss.
 

James N.

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When we visited in late Spring or early Summer, 2014 we were told by the girl in the visitor center that the city would only mow the site once or twice a season and it was already growing up badly again as you can tell from my photo above. This apparently winter shot makes it a lot easier to see the size and shape of the ruined works.
 



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