14 Civil War Personalities stories involved in the "Battle of Franklin"

Belle Montgomery

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#1
See at the bottom for list of others they covered- notable ones like Cleburn aren't on it-I don't know why not

#1 Civil War Personality: Carrie Winder McGavock mistress of Carnton
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By WILL POWELL, ERIC JACOBSON & KELLY GILFILLAN


The Battle of Franklin is full of stories of military tactics and heroism. A group of Leadership Franklin members worked with the Battle of Franklin Trust to tell more of the human story – one you can only try to imagine. Today you will hear from Carrie McGavock who worked tirelessly to make upwards of 300 soldiers as comfortable as possible in her home the night of the Battle of Franklin. Carrie is the well-known personality behind the bestselling “Widow of the South.”


Editor’s Note: The Battle of Franklin is full of stories of military tactics and heroism. A group of Leadership Franklin members worked with the Battle of Franklin Trust to tell more of the human story – one you can only try to imagine. Over the next six weeks, the Home Page will tell 15 of those stories that led to the commemoration of the Battle of Franklin and the events surrounding the Sesquicentennial. Each story has an introduction to a personality involved in the battle, a first-person account compiled from historic documents by LF class members, and a conclusion that lets you know what happened to our personality after the battle. Today you will hear from Carrie McGavock who worked tirelessly to make upwards of 300 soldiers as comfortable as possible in her home the night of the Battle of Franklin. Carrie is the well-known personality behind the bestselling “Widow of the South.”


Introduction of Carrie McGavock:


Carrie McGavock was born Carrie Winder in Natchez, Mississippi on September 9, 1829. During Carrie’s childhood, her parents moved the family from Natchez to a sugar plantation near Houma southwest of New Orleans. In 1848 she married John McGavock of Franklin, Tennessee and they moved to the McGavock home, which was known as Carnton. John and Carrie resided quietly at Carnton for over a decade, taking care of their children and experiencing the rapid financial growth of the farm on which nearly 40 slaves also lived and worked. However, the McGavocks saw their lives completely reshaped on a single day in late November 1864 when the colliding armies of North and South engaged in a terrible battle on the south side of Franklin.


Hear from Carrie McGavock: When the war began, my husband was able to stay at home, and helped to fund Confederate war efforts. We continued,

REST of article and access the other personalities here: https://franklinhomepage.com/category/historic-personalities/

John Bell Hood- use the duplicate one at the bottom -for whatever reason top one doesn't show story
General John Schofield
Brig. Gen Jacob Cox
Georgianna Adams, widow of Gen. John Adams
Hattie McGavock Cowan
George Cuppett, exhumer for Confederate cemetery
Israel Stiles
Capt. John Hickey – a dedicated veteran
Gen. George Gordon
Matilda Lotz
Fountain Branch Carter
Spencer Talley, Confederate Soldier
Dr. George Phillips, surgeon at Carnton
Lt. Aaron Baldwin- unfortunately his full story does not come up like it should-tech error?
 

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