137th New York on Culp's Hill Compared to 20th Maine on Little Round Top

The actions of the 137th New York deserve the same praise as the actions of the 20th Maine

  • Agree

    Votes: 9 90.0%
  • Disagree

    Votes: 1 10.0%

  • Total voters
    10

JeffBrooks

Sergeant Major
Joined
Aug 20, 2009
Location
Manor, TX
I am of the opinion that the actions of Colonel David Ireland and the 137th New York on Culp's Hill were every bit as heroic and important as those of Colonel Joshua Chamberlain and the 20th Maine on Little Round Top and deserve much more historical attention than they have received.

Do you agree or disagree?
 

infomanpa

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Feb 18, 2017
Location
Pennsylvania
I am of the opinion that the actions of Colonel David Ireland and the 137th New York on Culp's Hill were every bit as heroic and important as those of Colonel Joshua Chamberlain and the 20th Maine on Little Round Top and deserve much more historical attention than they have received.

Do you agree or disagree?
Absolutely right.
 

ronzzo

Private
Annual Winner
Joined
Mar 7, 2009
Location
Sadsburyville, PA
Correct! The 137th fought against greater odds than the 20th Maine, fought for a more sustained period ~ 11 hours and suffered the same percentage of casualties. Also Culp’s Hill was more important than LRT in that if the Confederates occupied it, they could have caused much consternation with the Union, even possibly getting in their rear. LRT wasn’t as significant.
 

Reg Parker

Cadet
Joined
Apr 19, 2019
Location
Phoenix, Arizona
The real untold story (of which I am researching to write) is of the NY regiments just above the 137th on Culp's Hill. My conjecture is that the 149th NY (and others) have not been properly credited beyond Collin's Regimental history published years later. They held the line and were very sparse. Had they broken, the 137th actions may have become irrelevant. After the battle, there was (some) confusion under whose command they had been and not much was written albeit they certainly were directed by Greene. In disclosure, my Uncle, Reuben Evans fought with the 149th. Also, I do agree with Jeff Brooks that much more credit and recognition is due Col. Ireland and the 137th et al.,.
 

Tom Elmore

1st Lieutenant
Member of the Year
Joined
Jan 16, 2015
Like Chamberlain himself said: "Every picket that sticks to the fence can claim the honor of keeping the pigs out of the garden."

I think Chamberlain deserves special credit for employing impromptu tactical innovations suitable to the terrain that helped defeat his opponent, unaided at that particular point, in full daylight.

It was more of a team effort on the other end; along with Ireland's tenacity was Greene's insistence that breastworks be constructed, and those breastworks helped keep casualties down and prevented Ireland from being immediately overrun. After his flank was turned and his line rolled up he was fortunate to have timely support from the 14th Brooklyn and 6th Wisconsin to stabilize the situation. Darkness also worked in Ireland's favor on the far right.
 

Reg Parker

Cadet
Joined
Apr 19, 2019
Location
Phoenix, Arizona
Jeff from Syracuse: Just another note...My G G Grandfather Charles H. Weaver fought with Co. E, 185th NY (6th Onondaga). The 185th well depicted in Jeffrey Woods "Under Chamberlains Flag"...Stories of the 198th PA and 185th NY".

In 2010, I was able to procure a replacement headstone for Pvt. C. H. Weaver in the Homer, NY Cemetery. If you walk the cemetery, you will be astonished how many of the 185th NY are buried there. I spent a day (with Wood's book in hand) walking the cemetery, reading the headstones and looking them up in the book. I said a lot of prayers in thanks to these men and felt as if I knew many of them.

Although from Arizona now (Picacho Peak SUVCW member), I am in Skaneateles area for summer researching Cheddar Valley (Somerset, Eng.) migrations beginning 1830-ish through 1920's to Skaneateles area. My G Uncle, Reuben Evans came in 1847...went to California for the gold rush and returned to Skaneateles. He enlisted in 149th NY at start of war and fought all through the war. Wounded at Resca, promoted to Corporal and continued to the end. He died in 1902 and is buried in Lakeside Cemetery in Skan.

One thing I am trying to learn is when/how these immigrants actually became US Citizens. I am still early in that research but would appreciate any insight. My ultimate goal is to write something akin to Jeff Wood's book on the 149th NY.
 

Tom Elmore

1st Lieutenant
Member of the Year
Joined
Jan 16, 2015
According to the Syracuse Journal of March 20, 1939, Company A of the 149th New York was recruited from a Syracuse synagogue; Company B was all German, and Company C all Irish. With few exceptions, Company F men were from Manlius, New York, according to Collins' regimental history. James Smith of Company G was from Skaneateles, as was Lieutenant Colonel Randall.
 
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