123rd NY Infantry - Act of Kindness at Gettysburg

Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

lelliott19

Captain
Forum Host
Silver Patron
Joined
Mar 15, 2013
Messages
6,512
Sergeant Henry C Morhouse
Company C, 123rd New York Infantry

McDougall’s Brigade, Williams’ Division, Twelfth Corps, Army of the Potomac.


"The morning of July 4th dawned bright and beautiful. There being no evidence of the enemy in front the boys went over the works in quest of the wounded. Wesley P. Huntington of Co C was brought in dead. They buried him on the field beneath the shade of a large oak tree, there to remain until the roll-call of that day when all shall assemble at the order of the Great Commander. Among the many wounded Rebels brought in was one South Carolinian who was wounded severely. The boys did everything they could for him, - brought him hot coffee and the best of what they had to eat, and a doctor to dress his wounds. He received these acts of kindness with seeming astonishment, and with tears running down his face thanked them, and said he did not expect such kindness from the "Yanks." He expected to be treated with roughness and perhaps cruelty, and had tried to crawl away but was unable to do so. He said if he could only live to get home to his wife and children he should never raise a hand against the Yankees or the dear old flag again."
Final Report on the Battlefield of Gettysburg, Volume 2, By New York Monuments Commission for the Battlefields of Gettysburg and Chattanooga, William Freeman Fox, p.860.
https://books.google.com/books?id=JQYTAAAAYAAJ&dq=inauthor:"New York (State). Monuments Commission for the Battlefields of Gettysburg and Chattanooga"&pg=PA443#v=onepage&q&f=false
Expired Image Removed

Sgt Henry C Morhouse http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=10038501
 
Last edited:
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

LoyaltyOfDogs

First Sergeant
Joined
Aug 8, 2011
Messages
1,485
Location
Gettysburg area
Last edited:

Drew

Major
Joined
Oct 22, 2012
Messages
7,918
The boys did everything they could for him, - brought him hot coffee and the best of what they had to eat, and a doctor to dress his wounds. He received these acts of kindness with seeming astonishment, and with tears running down his face thanked them, and said he did not expect such kindness from the "Yanks." He expected to be treated with roughness and perhaps cruelty, and had tried to crawl away but was unable to do so.
Thanks, Laura, for posting this. It's important to remember this stuff. My grandmother's granddad left a written account of being shot, in 1864. He went down on the field at Darbytown Road outside of Richmond and was captured by Union forces who carried him to a field hospital and amputated his leg. He might have died otherwise but said he was cared for by "good, kind nurses" during that time. There's tons of stories on both sides about this sort of thing. Let's not forget them.
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!
Top