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10th Louisiana Infantry "Lee's Foreign Legion"

Discussion in 'Regimental Histories' started by AUG351, Jul 10, 2018.

  1. AUG351

    AUG351 Captain Forum Host

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    10th Louisiana Infantry.jpg
    Battle flag of the 10th Louisiana, a Richmond Depot Third Bunting Issue. Now on display at the Confederate Memorial Hall in New Orleans.


    The 10th Louisiana was also known as "Lee's Foreign Legion" because it was so ethnically diverse, consisting of men from 21 different nationalities. Louisiana units - especially those recruited in New Orleans - tended to be very cosmopolitan, but the Tenth was perhaps one of the most.

    According to Lee's Tigers Revisited by Terry L. Jones, p. 404, "The regiment was composed of men from 21 nations (only three of the companies were predominantly Anglo-American), and most were laborers, farmers, and sailors. Of those giving a place of birth, 170 were born in Louisiana; 71 in states outside Louisiana; 249 in Ireland; 84 in the Germanic states; 44 in France; 26 in Italy; 24 in England; 20 in Spain; 9 in Canada; 7 each in Austria, Greece, and Mexico; 5 in Gibraltar; 4 in Portugal; 3 in Sicily; 2 in Norway; and 1 each in Corsica, Cuba, Martinique, Russia, Sardinia, and Switzerland."

    Company I "Tirailleurs d'Orleans" contained all 26 Italians, as well as 6 Greeks.
     

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  3. AUG351

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    Regimental history from Guide to Louisiana Confederate Military Units, 1861-1865 by Arthur W. Bergeron, Jr., slightly edited:


    COLONELS. Mandeville Marigny, resigned July 23, 1862; Eugene Waggaman.

    LIEUTENANT COLONELS. Jules C. Denis, resigned December 28, 1861; Eugene Waggaman, promoted colonel July 23, 1862; William H. Spencer, killed August 30, 1862; John M. Leggett, killed May 3, 1863; Henry D. Monier.

    MAJORS. Felix Dumonteil, resigned January 4, 1862; William H. Spencer, promoted lieutenant colonel July 23, 1862; John M. Leggett, promoted lieutenant colonel August 30, 1862; Henry D. Monier, promoted lieutenant colonel May 3, 1863; Thomas N. Powell, killed April 3, 1865.​


    COMPANIES AND THEIR COMMANDERS

    Company A, Shepherd Guards (Orleans). Alfred Philips, resigned December 28, 1861; Jacob A. Cohen, killed August 3o, 1862; Isaac L. Lyons.

    Company B, Derbigny Guards (Orleans). Lea F. Bakewell, resigned August 26, 1861; Edward W. Huntington, resigned December 28, 1861; Henry C. Marks, killed July I, 1862; James Buckner, promoted assistant quartermaster October 6, 1862; Charles Knowlton, retired October 31, 1864.

    Company C, Hewitt Guards (Orleans). Richard M. Hewitt, resigned December 28, 1861; Thomas N. Powell, promoted major May 3, 1864; James Scott.

    Company D, Hawkins Guards (Orleans). Charles F. White, resigned December 211 1861; Jacob H. Williams, resigned November 8, 1862; Ernest Webre, retired January io, 1865.

    Company E, Louisiana Swamp Rifles (Pointe Coupee). David N. Dickey, resigned April 15, 1862; Sainville Cucullu, dropped January 5, 1863; Samuel H. Faulkner.

    Company F, Louisiana Rebels (Orleans). John M. Leggett, promoted major July 28, 1862; Albert F. Pagnier, retired November 8, 1864.

    Company G, Orleans Rangers (Orleans). Edward Crevon, resigned December 21, 1861; M. A. Guerin, resigned May 28, 1862; Michael A. Becnel, resigned June 23, 1862; Charles B. Marmillion.

    Company H, Orleans Blues (Orleans). William B. Barnett, resigned January 13, 1863; Leon Jastremski.

    Company I, Tirailleurs d'Orleans (Orleans). Eugene Waggaman, promoted lieutenant colonel December 28, 1861; Henry D. Monier, promoted major January 29, 1863; Alphonse Jonte, killed May 3, 1863; P. Leclaire, killed May 12, 1864.

    Company K, Confederate States Rangers (St. Landry). William H. Spencer, promoted major January 16, 1862; Auguste Perrodin.


    This regiment was organized at Camp Moore on July 22, 1861, with 796 men, by the addition of five companies to the 2nd Louisiana Special Battalion. The regiment went to Virginia and received orders to report to the Army of the Peninsula at Yorktown. On April 16, 1862, the regiment moved to support units engaged with the enemy at Dam No. 1, or Lee's Mills. The men skirmished with the enemy on May 4 at Williamsburg. During the Seven Days' Battles, the men saw no fighting until July 1 at Malvern Hill. In that battle, the regiment was the only Confederate unit to penetrate the Federal lines; 87 of its men were killed, wounded, or missing.

    On July 26, the regiment was brigaded with the 1st, 2nd, 9th [later replaced with the 14th], and 15th Louisiana regiments and with Coppens' Zouave Battalion [Starke's/Nicholls'/Stafford's Brigade, aka 2nd Louisiana Brigade].

    The men participated in the Battle of Cedar Mountain, August 9, and in the 2nd Manassas Campaign, August 28-30 [including the fight for the Railroad Cut]. After witnessing the capture of Harper's Ferry, the regiment fought in the Battle of Sharpsburg, September 17; 57 of its men were killed, wounded, or missing. The men were in reserve during the Battle of Fredericksburg, December 13.

    On May 2, 1863, the brigade participated in General Stonewall Jackson's attack on the Federal right flank at Chancellorsville. The next day, the men again attacked the enemy [Hooker's line at Fairview and the Chancellorsville crossroads]; and in the two days of fighting, approximately 94 men became casualties. On June 15, the regiment and the 2nd Louisiana Regiment captured 1,000 Federals near Winchester. The men participated in the attacks on Culp's Hill at Gettysburg, July 2-3, and suffered 116 casualties. By July 17, only 109 officers and enlisted men were still present for duty. The regiment fought in the Bristoe Station Campaign, October 9-22, and in the Mine Run Campaign, November 26—December 2.

    On May 5, 1864, the regiment was engaged in the Battle of the Wilderness. The enemy overran the brigade at the Mule Shoe during the Battle of Spotsylvania, May 12, and 56 men of the regiment were captured [after which, the 1st and 2nd Louisiana brigades were consolidated]. On June 3, the Federals captured the regiment's flag during the Battle of Cold Harbor. The few remaining men accompanied the brigade to the Shenandoah Valley in mid-June. There they fought in the following battles and engagements: Monocacy, July 9; Cedar Creek, August 12; Leetown, August 25; Winchester, September 19; Fisher's Hill, September 21- 22; and Cedar Creek, October 19.

    Following these battles, the remnants of the regiment were consolidated with the remnants of the 15th Louisiana into a single company. The brigade rejoined General Robert E. Lee's army at Petersburg in December. The regiment participated in the attack on Fort Stedman on March 25, 1865. When Lee surrendered at Appomattox Court House, on April 9, Colonel Waggaman commanded the remnants of the two [consolidated] Louisiana brigades in the army. Three officers and 13 enlisted men of the regiment were paroled. The regiment had a total enrollment of 845 men.

    During the war, 142 men were killed, 58 died of disease, 3 were murdered, and 2 died in accidents.​
     
  4. AUG351

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    Statistics are a slightly different in Lee's Tigers Revisited by Terry L. Jones:

    [The 10th Louisiana's] total enrollment was 953 men, of whom 138 were killed or mortally wounded, 59 died of disease, 5 were killed accidentally, 4 were murdered, 140 deserted (66 of those who deserted did so to join other Confederate units), and at least 163 took the oath of allegiance (42 of those joined the Union army). Sixteen men were still on duty when the regiment surrendered at Appomattox.

    The regiment's original officers were Col. Mandeville Marigny, Lt. Col. Jules C. Denis, and Maj. Felix DuMonteil. Marigny was a former French army officer who patterned the 10th Louisiana after the French army regiments with which he had previous experience. The French language and manual of arms were used to train the unit. Marigny resigned in July 1862, but he must have left the regiment at an earlier date because Lt. Col. Eugene Waggaman led the men during the Seven Days Campaign. When Waggaman was captured at Malvern Hill, Lt. Col. William Spencer took command, but he was killed two months later at Second Manassas. John M. Legett then took over, but he was also killed at Chancellorsville. Command fell to Henry Monier, but in mid-1864 Waggaman returned from extended duty in Louisiana and resumed his place. When Waggaman was promoted to command the consolidated Louisiana Brigade in February 1865, Monier again took command of the regiment and surrendered it at Appomattox. During the war, 13 of the officers were killed or mortally wounded and 2 died of disease.​
     
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  5. AUG351

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    BIBLIOGRAPHY

    Brooks, Thomas W. and Jones, Michael D. Lee's Foreign Legion: A History of the 10th Louisiana Infantry. Gravenhurst, Ont.: Watts Printing, 1995.

    Buckley, Cornelius M., ed. A Frenchman, a Chaplain, a Rebel: The War Letters of Pere Louis-Hippolyte Cache, S. J. Chicago: Loyola University Press, 1981.

    "Colonel Eugene Waggaman, Who Led the Tenth Louisiana Regiment in the Famous Charge at Malvern Hill." Southern Historical Society Papers, XVI (1888), 446-51.

    "Eugene Waggaman." Southern Historical Society Papers, XXV (1897), 180-86.

    Jones, Michael D. Confederate States Rangers of the 10th Louisiana Infantry. CreateSpace Independent Publishing, 2014.

    Jones, Terry L. Lee's Tigers Revisited: The Louisiana Infantry in the Army of Northern Virginia. Baton Rouge: LSU Press, 2017.

    Pinkowski, Edward. Pills, Pen and Politics: The Story of General Leon Jastremski. Wilmington, Del., 1974.
     
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  6. AUG351

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    Here are the links to several good articles on Michael Dan Jones' blog.

    Confederate States Rangers, Co. K, 10th Louisiana:
    http://thesouthsdefender.blogspot.com/2010/04/confederate-states-rangers.html

    The charge of the 10th Louisiana at Malvern Hill:
    http://thesouthsdefender.blogspot.com/2015/07/the-charge-of-10th-louisiana-infantry.html

    The 10th Louisiana Infantry at Chancellorsville:
    http://thesouthsdefender.blogspot.com/2013/05/150-years-ago-10th-louisiana-infantry.html

    Letters of Lt. Edward A. Seton:
    http://thesouthsdefender.blogspot.com/2010/02/letters-from-louisiana-tiger.html
     
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  7. AUG351

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    Col. Eugene Waggaman.jpg
    Colonel Eugene Waggaman

    Born on October 18, 1826, in New Orleans, Eugene Waggaman was the son of United States Senator George Augustus Waggaman and Marie Camille Arnoult.

    He was educated at Mount Saint Mary's College, Maryland, and studied civil engineering and architecture, graduating as the 1849 class valedictorian. He then returned to Louisiana and ran the family's sugar plantation in Jefferson Parish. He was also a member of the State Legislature in 1858-1859.

    At the outbreak of the war he recruited a cavalry company in his parish, the Jefferson Chasseurs. He was appointed their captain and offered their services to the Confederate government, however it was turned down as "too costly to support." Captain Waggaman asked his troopers to fight on foot, though every man declined.

    Failing to raise a company, he later enlisted as a private in the 10th Louisiana Infantry, which was commanded by his cousin, Colonel Mandeville Marigny. Before the unit left for duty in Virginia, Waggaman had been elected captain of Company I "Tirailleurs d'Orleans."

    Captain Waggaman soon rose to the rank of lieutenant colonel on January 16, 1862, and was acting commander of the 10th Louisiana after Col. Marigny resigned. He led the Tenth in their famous charge at Malvern Hill on July 1, 1862, where they were the only unit to break the Federal line. Waggaman was right in the midst of the fighting, waving his family's 150-year-old heirloom sword; however, with with a Federal counterattack, he and a handful of his men were surrounded and captured.

    Waggaman was then sent to Fort Warren near Boston, Massachusetts; though he was soon released from Union custody in a prisoner exchange on August 5, 1862, returning to New Orleans for duty as a recruiter. He received a promotion to colonel on October 1, 1862.

    Just before his capture at Malvern Hill, Waggaman threw his ancestral sword away to keep it out of enemy hands; however, a Union soldier must have picked it up because somehow it ended up in in the hands of Gen. Winfield S. Hancock, as when Waggaman was later exchanged Gen. Hancock had the sword returned to him. Today it is owned by one of Waggaman's descendants.

    In 1864 Colonel Waggaman was again called to Virginia by special order of Gen. Robert E. Lee and placed in command of the 2nd Louisiana Brigade. Waggaman served gallantly in remaining campaigns and was wounded in the forearm at the battle of Third Winchester on September 19, 1864. Despite the infected wound he stayed in command. He later led the consolidated Louisiana brigade in the attack on Fort Stedman during the Siege of Petersburg, and commanded what was left of it during the surrender at Appomattox C.H.

    When Waggaman formed the brigade on that final day, before the surrender ceremony, he asked the men if he could have a piece of the Tenth's flag (not the same flag as in the OP) to keep as a memento, to which they agreed. He then used his ancestral sword to cut off the lateral side with two stars. It was Waggaman's most treasured possession in postwar years, refusing numerous requests for a piece of it. Only once did he agree, and that was to give Robert E. Lee's daughter Mildred a piece with one of the stars in exchange for a portrait of her father.
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2018
  8. AUG351

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    Col. Mandeville Marigny.jpg
    Antoine James de Marigny (aka Mandeville Marigny) in French officer's uniform, 1832-33.

    Marigny served as colonel of the 10th Louisiana until he resigned in July 1862.


    Only info I could find on him was this from Confederate Colonels: A Biographical Register:

    De Marigny, Antoine Jacques Philippe de Mandeville. Born Nov. 21, 1811, New Orleans, LA. Graduate of Saumur, the French military school. Officer in the French army, 1831-34. Returned to LA. New Orleans merchant. Planter. US marshal for East LA. Militia officer. Md. Sophronia, daughter of Gov. Claiborne. Col., 10th LA, July 22, 1861. Resigned July 23, 1862, disgusted with the "favoritism" he thought the War Dept. showed to other officers. Returned to his LA plantations. Broker in New Orleans postwar. Died there June 3, 1890. Buried St. Louis Cemetery No. 1. His name is given many different ways—he was generally known as "Mandeville" Marigny. According to Gen. McLaws, Marigny "sp [oke] English but indifferently well."​
     
  9. AUG351

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    Leon Jastremski.jpg
    Captain Leon Jastremski

    Leon Jastremski was born in Soulon, France, July 17, 1843. His father was a Polish emigre to France; he studied medicine and married before moving his family to Louisiana. Orphaned after his parents' death in 1856, Leon eventually moved to Abbeville, Baton Rouge, and New Orleans, working as a printer's assistant and as a drugstore clerk.

    At the outset of the war Jastremski enlisted as a private in the Louisiana Swamp Rifles, Company E of the 10th Louisiana. He quickly rose through the ranks from corporal to sergeant major. In the regiment's charge at Malvern Hill he was captured and imprisoned at Fort Delaware until exchanged in August 1862. He received a commission as captain of Company H on September 23, 1862.

    Jastremski then fought in all the Tenth's battles until captured again at Spotsylvania in 1864. He was wounded in the throat by a shell fragment at Chancellorsville, permanently altering his voice. He was also slightly wounded in the right hand at Gettysburg, and again at Spotsylvania. After his second capture he was chosen as one of the "Immortal 600" (a group of Confederate officers who were sent from Fort Delaware to Charleston Harbor and placed under fire of their own guns as a means of retaliation).

    After the war he was a three term mayor of Baton Rouge and twice ran for Governor of the State of Louisiana.
    Jastremski was also elected chairman of the Democratic State Central Committee, and led Grover Cleveland's presidential campaign in Louisiana. He was U.S. consul to Peru from 1893 to 1897, was appointed state commissioner of agriculture, and later served as a private secretary to the governor. He was also a founding member of the United Confederate Veterans.

    He died November 29, 1907, and is buried in St. Joseph Catholic Cemetery in Baton Rouge.
     
  10. AUG351

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    Sgt. Joseph C. LeBleu.jpg
    Joseph C. Lebleu, Company K "Confederate States Rangers," 10th Louisiana Infantry.

    Born on April 8, 1841, in Calcasieu Parish, La., Joseph C. Lebleu was the youngest of a family of eight children to Arsine and Eliza (Milhomme) LeBleu. Arsine, born 1787, was the first settler in Calcasieu east of the Calcasieu river. By occupation Arsine was a planter and stock raiser; he later traveled to California in 1849 to mine gold, but died there in Sacremento in 1850.

    At the outset of the war Joseph and fourteen other men from his neighborhood enlisted in the Confederate States Rangers, Co. K of the 10th Louisiana. He was later appointed color bearer on Sept. 1, 1861, and served in the Peninsula Campaign and Seven Days battles. Lt. Edward A. Seton of his company wrote that Lebleu carried the colors in the charge at Malvern Hill and the staff was shot in two in his hands, though Lebleu made it out unscathed.

    He was later at home on furlough when Vicksburg fell and could not get back to the 10th Louisiana, so he joined the 7th Louisiana Cavalry, operating in the Trans-Mississippi where he served throughout the remainder of the war. With the 7th LA Cav Lebleu would see action in the Red River Campaign, operations against Jayhawkers in Louisiana and other skirmishes. He survived the war and was mustered out at Natchitoches, La., returning home to resume farming and later becoming a prominent member of his community.

    Some more info here: http://thesouthsdefender.blogspot.com/2015/07/joseph-camarsac-lebleu-life-of.html
     
  11. AUG351

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    Isaac and James Reeves.jpg
    Brothers, Cpl. Isaac & Sgt. James Reeves, Company K "Confederate States Rangers," 10th Louisiana Infantry.


    Michael Dan Jones tells the story of the three Reeves brothers, James, Isaac and John, in this blog post:

    Calcasieu Parish escaped the widespread devastation that many areas of the state and South suffered during the Civil War. Although it escaped physical devastation however, hardly a family in the parish was left untouched by human tragedy. Few families suffered a greater loss than the pioneer Reeves family.

    Three sons left for the war in 1861, James, Isaac and John, and only one came back, and he had suffered a terrible wound. The brothers were the sons of George Reeves and Mary Ann Ryan, the sister of Jacob Ryan Jr., who is known as the ''Father of Lake Charles.''

    James Reeves was the oldest of the brothers. He was born in 1836 and was a farmer before he enlisted. He was married to Tabitha Harmon and had one son, David George Reeves, who was born in 1858. Isaac and John Reeves were twins born in 1840. They were both single at the time of their enlistment in 1861 and were also farmers.

    The brothers joined with other local volunteers to help form the Confederate States Rangers. James was a sergeant, Isaac a corporal and John a private. They were among a 37 man contingent from Calcasieu Parish who left for the war in mid-1861. The contingent was mostly comprised of the sons of pioneer families in the parish, and most all were related in some way.

    There were six sets of brothers in the company, an uncle and nephew, and most were related to one another as cousins or through marriage. When their regiment got into heavy combat, the casualty rate took a heavy toll on local families. The last names of the volunteers in Company K are still among the most common in Southwest Louisiana, including LeBleu, Marcantel, Ryan, Pithon, Moss, Kirkman, Bolin, Linscombe, Miller, Morgan, Langley, Hoffpauir, Farque, Foreman, Hargrove, Harrington, Ellender, Courville, Trahan and Buller.

    [. . . .]

    James, Isaac and John experienced their first taste of combat on July 1, 1862 at the Battle of Malvern Hill near Richmond, Virginia. All three came through unscathed.

    The next battle was Cedar Run on August 9, followed by Second Manassas on Aug. 29, 30. At Manassas, the Louisianans ran out of ammunition and threw rocks to stop a Union assault. Again, all three brothers came through safely.

    James was wounded in the next battle, the Battle of Sharpsburg (Antietam) which is known as the bloodiest single day in American History. The 10th Louisiana fought in a cornfield and along the Hagerstown Pike early in the battle. Both sides lost 23,000 men in killed, wounded and missing.

    The elder brother recovered from his wound and was given a furlough home. He delivered letters from his comrades to loved ones and brought 1st Lt. Edward A. Seton's sword to Seton's mother in Lake Charles. As if the tragedy of war wasn't enough, James lost his wife Tabitha, who died in childbirth.

    After returning to his command, he would fight just one more battle. The Battle of Chancellorsville, fought May 1-3, 1863, has been called Lee's greatest victory of the war. The tactical maneuvers he and Stonewall Jackson used there are still studied at West Point. But for the soldiers who fought there, it was a horrifying nightmare.

    Sgt. James Reeves was killed in action and Lt. Seton wrote the following account of his death in a letter dated June 17, 1863 from a hospital in Liberty, Va.:

    ''Dear Mama, I expect you have been living in great suspense for these last six weeks on account of having heard of my wound and probably of my death for such was reported for I had been taken prisoner after being wounded. Our company stood on the field (to) the last and fought with the Yankees at 30 yards distance. They (his men) did not leave until I told them to go...Poor Jim Reeves was killed at my left and I went to get his rifle to give to F.(Frederick) Sark whose gun would not fire and at that moment I was wounded and when I looked around to give Sark the gun I seen, poor fellow, he was killed also. Those are the fortunes of a poor soldier.''

    Also at Chancellorsville, Pvt. John Reeves was severely wounded and lost his eyesight. He spent the rest of the war in a hospital. John's twin, Isaac, also suffered a wound but it did not keep him out of action for long.

    The Gettysburg campaign quickly followed. The 10th Louisiana was part of Ewell's Corp that cleared the way for Lee's greatest invasion of the North. The regiment fought and helped win the Battle of Winchester on June 14 and 15, 1863.

    The first day of the Battle of Gettysburg, July 1, found the regiment 30 miles away and it didn't arrive until sundown after a forced march in the hot sun. The regiment went into battle on the Confederate left flank at Culp's Hill. During the assault the next day, July 2, Isaac Reeves was killed in action.

    In just two months time two of the brothers had been killed and the third disabled.
    The Reeves family tragedy was a reflection of the loss of other Calcasieu families.

    After four years of the most brutal warfare experienced on the North American continent, only two of the 37 local men were left in the ranks at the surrender at Appomattox Courthouse April 9, 1865. Those two were Pvt. Jacob Ellender and Pvt. William Reeves, a cousin to the three brothers.
    http://thesouthsdefender.blogspot.com/2009/09/reeves-brothers-tragedy-of-war.html
     
  12. AUG351

    AUG351 Captain Forum Host

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    Malvern Hill battlefield.jpg
    This is a postwar photo of the Crew slave cabins on the Malvern Hill battlefield, looking toward the Federal left flank. The 10th Louisiana charged over this ground and broke through around where the cabins are. IIRC, this side of the battlefield is mainly covered by woods today.

    Another interesting fact is that the 10th Louisiana was counterattacked by the Irish Brigade after they broke through, so many of the Irishmen in the Tenth were pitted against fellow Irishmen here.
     
  13. AUG351

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    457183_311537818920959_1965061960_o.jpg
    "The Diehards" by Don Troiani depicts the 2nd Louisiana Brigade (including the Tenth) fighting in the Railroad Cut at Second Manassas, desperately holding back the Federal troops by throwing rocks after running low on ammunition.

    This was during Maj. Gen. John Fitz Porter's assault on Jackson's line at the Railroad Cut on August 30, 1862. The Louisianians were right in the center of it, bearing the full brunt of the attack, but held the line until reinforced.
     
  14. AUG351

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    Eye to Eye Along Hagerstown Pike.jpg
    "Eye to Eye Along the Hagerstown Pike" by Keith Rocco depicts Starke's 2nd Louisiana Brigade duking it out with the Iron Brigade at Antietam.

    This was during the morning phase of the battle, just south of Miller's Cornfield. The Louisianians advanced out of the West Woods and met the Iron Brigade as well as Berdan's U.S. Sharpshooters on the opposite side of the Hagerstown Pike. Starke's men held their ground until their left flank was threatened and were forced to fall back. The brigade was only engaged for about thirty minutes, but out of around 600 men carried into action 81 were killed, 189 wounded, and 17 missing. Every field officer was also killed or wounded, and Brig. Gen. William E. Starke (acting division commander) was reportedly shot three times and died shortly thereafter.

    Rallying Behind the Turnpike Fence.jpg
    Illustration from Battles & Leaders of the same action.

    This was also the same spot where Alexander Gardner later took the well-known photographs of Confederate dead along the fence line. Perhaps some of these men were from the 10th Louisiana.
    Antietam fence 1.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2018
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  16. AUG351

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    Great unit to profile.
     
  18. dlavin

    dlavin First Sergeant

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    Enjoyed the read very much, thanks for your hard work.
     
  19. Tom Elmore

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    Private Richard Carpenter was born in Dublin on April 18, 1837. He went to Liverpool, England in 1848. He served in the British army, then in 1854 joined the British navy and served on the battleship Duke of Wellington during the Crimean War. He landed in Canada in 1858, and thence came to New Orleans. (Confederate Veteran, vol. 34, 1926)
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2018
  20. Kip124thNY

    Kip124thNY Corporal

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    Thanks for posting.
     
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  21. Coonewah Creek

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    Thanks for starting the thread. Always interesting to read of exploits of a particular regiment, Blue or Gray.
     
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