Monuments 105-year-old Confederate statue stirs controversy in Loudoun (Photos) - VA

CMWinkler

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#1
105-year-old Confederate statue stirs controversy in Loudoun (Photos)


Wednesday - 5/15/2013, 10:32am ET
Expired Image Removed
A statue of a Confederate soldier sits outside the Loudoun County Courthouse, but some find the statue intimidating and want it moved. (WTOP/Hank Silverbeg)
150 years after the Civil War, some wounds are unhealed

WTOP's Hank Silverberg reports. (runs 1:21)
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LEESBURG, Va. - A statue of a Confederate soldier that has stood in front of the historic courthouse in Loudoun County since 1908 is now being called inappropriate and a local lawyer says it should be removed.
The statue was erected to honor the war dead at a time when many Civil war veterans were still alive.
The statue shows a Confederate soldier standing guard with his rifle ready.
An inscription, carved into the stone monument, says, "In memory of the Confederate Soldiers of Loudoun County, Va. Erected May 28, 1908."
But Loudoun County, deeply divided over the war in 1861, may not have healed old wounds.
Attorney John Flannery, who often has cases in the courthouse, wants the statue moved elsewhere. He says it's intimidating to some of his clients.
"It deters people. It chills them from believing they can get a fair shake in court," he says.
Flannery says he's actually had clients who are afraid they won't get justice in a courthouse after seeing the statue.
"It's a living, active courthouse, which already has challenges in terms of discrimination in terms of persons of color, and not only them."
But he will get an argument from many local folks. Local historian Gene Scheel says the statue is not a symbol, it's history.
"In 1908, a statue like this was considered to be an honor, that's history."

For the rest: http://www.wtop.com/159/3322329/105-year-old-Confederate-statue-stirs-controversy-Photos
 

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AUG

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imo I think those Confederate soldiers earned and deserve that monument. They marched and fought for their own beliefs and they had to see battle however many times. These people who complain about the monument probably have no idea what these men went through or who they were. Even though the Confederate soldiers are long gone they earned the right for that monument to still stand there.
 

CMWinkler

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I can see the point hes making. If you have clients who see the Confederate soldier not as a honorored ancestor but as someone who fought to keep them enslaved, then I could see how that might give them an impression that they wouldn't get a fair day in court..
With respect, Wil, then they'd be wrong. Confederate soldiers did not fight to enslave anyone in 2013. To suggest they did is, well, at best, disingenuous. If it were my client, I would tell them that the monument is history and should be seen as a symbol of hope because of the lengths the US has gone to defeat the evil of racism. To suggest that it symbolizes an attempt to deny them equal protection of the law is simply false. Quite the contrary, to memorialize Confederate soldiers was very important as those who fought were dying out. To attempt to remove them does not say anything about tolerance or the importance of diversity that the proponents of such removals claim to advocate. The monument should provide a moment for education as opposed to a desire to hide away something someone that some see as offensive.
 

CSA Today

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#6
105-year-old Confederate statue stirs controversy in Loudoun (Photos)


Wednesday - 5/15/2013, 10:32am ET
Expired Image Removed
By Hank Silverberg
Expired Image Removed
A statue of a Confederate soldier sits outside the Loudoun County Courthouse, but some find the statue intimidating and want it moved. (WTOP/Hank Silverbeg)
150 years after the Civil War, some wounds are unhealed


WTOP's Hank Silverberg reports. (runs 1:21)
Download
LEESBURG, Va. - A statue of a Confederate soldier that has stood in front of the historic courthouse in Loudoun County since 1908 is now being called inappropriate and a local lawyer says it should be removed.
The statue was erected to honor the war dead at a time when many Civil war veterans were still alive.
The statue shows a Confederate soldier standing guard with his rifle ready.
An inscription, carved into the stone monument, says, "In memory of the Confederate Soldiers of Loudoun County, Va. Erected May 28, 1908."
But Loudoun County, deeply divided over the war in 1861, may not have healed old wounds.
Attorney John Flannery, who often has cases in the courthouse, wants the statue moved elsewhere. He says it's intimidating to some of his clients.
"It deters people. It chills them from believing they can get a fair shake in court," he says.
Flannery says he's actually had clients who are afraid they won't get justice in a courthouse after seeing the statue.
"It's a living, active courthouse, which already has challenges in terms of discrimination in terms of persons of color, and not only them."
But he will get an argument from many local folks. Local historian Gene Scheel says the statue is not a symbol, it's history.
"In 1908, a statue like this was considered to be an honor, that's history."

For the rest: http://www.wtop.com/159/3322329/105-year-old-Confederate-statue-stirs-controversy-Photos
It sounds like attorney John Flannery needs to move to a more serene clime before he has a nervous breakdown.

“No country ever had truer sons, No people-bolder defenders, No principle – purer victims”
Inscribed on the Confederate Monument in front of the Marlboro County Court House in Bennettsville, South Carolina
 

wilber6150

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#7
With respect, Wil, then they'd be wrong. Confederate soldiers did not fight to enslave anyone in 2013. To suggest they did is, well, at best, disingenuous. If it were my client, I would tell them that the monument is history and should be seen as a symbol of hope because of the lengths the US has gone to defeat the evil of racism. To suggest that it symbolizes an attempt to deny them equal protection of the law is simply false. Quite the contrary, to memorialize Confederate soldiers was very important as those who fought were dying out. To attempt to remove them does not say anything about tolerance or the importance of diversity that the proponents of such removals claim to advocate. The monument should provide a moment for education as opposed to a desire to hide away something someone that some see as offensive.
I'm sure that would put a black persons fears at ease when they walked past a Confederate statue into court..Whether you as a white man think their fears are baseless or not is not the point . People whose ancestors were slaves or grew up with fears of the klan have a very different outlook on what statues to the Confederacy or their fighting men mean then you or I..And these thoughts could very easily color their view on what kind of justice they would receive, and if this man thinks its affecting his clinents then hes doing the right thing..No one is saying destroy the statue, but simply move it from an active court house..
 

CMWinkler

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I'm sure that would put a black persons fears at ease when they walked past a Confederate statue into court..Whether you as a white man think their fears are baseless or not is not the point . People whose ancestors were slaves or grew up with fears of the klan have a very different outlook on what statues to the Confederacy or their fighting men mean then you or I..And these thoughts could very easily color their view on what kind of justice they would receive, and if this man thinks its affecting his clinents then hes doing the right thing..No one is saying destroy the statue, but simply move it from an active court house..
OK, so I'm offended by the flag of Virginia flying at the Courthouse because it was once carried by Confederate troops. Should it, too, come down?

OK, African Americans certainly have a different view. I freely accept that. Does that mean their view ought to prevail? Why is, for example, their view more important than say, mine, about a Confederate monument?

My point with the Virginia flag is where does it end? Must everyone's fears be catered to?
 

James B White

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OK, so I'm offended by the flag of Virginia flying at the Courthouse because it was once carried by Confederate troops. Should it, too, come down?

OK, African Americans certainly have a different view. I freely accept that. Does that mean their view ought to prevail? Why is, for example, their view more important than say, mine, about a Confederate monument?

My point with the Virginia flag is where does it end? Must everyone's fears be catered to?
Seeing this from the point of view that government should be as responsive to those being governed as possible, I'd say that where it ends is with a local vote: county-wide for a county courthouse, city-wide for a city hall, state-wide for a state capital, etc. That would allow the local community, who put up the statue, to move it if they wanted, or leave it be. Those outside the community or the federal government should only get involved if the laws we voted for as a whole nation are being broken, and in this case, I can't see anything applicable there.
 

CMWinkler

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Seeing this from the point of view that government should be as responsive to those being governed as possible, I'd say that where it ends is with a local vote: county-wide for a county courthouse, city-wide for a city hall, state-wide for a state capital, etc. That would allow the local community, who put up the statue, to move it if they wanted, or leave it be. Those outside the community or the federal government should only get involved if the laws we voted for as a whole nation are being broken, and in this case, I can't see anything applicable there.
Very democratic. Should we do the same with historic buildings? I mean some old building which is not as efficient or user friendly ought to be at the whim of the now, as well, right? If this attitude prevails then no historic monument is safe. I was speaking with an English friend not long ago and he was so appalled by Britain Imperialistic past and those it exploited t6hat he wanted to see the removal of Nelson's statute in Trafalgar Square. If he convinces enough of his friends, should Nelson go? I'm sorry, but the idea that public art deemed offensive by some lawyer, should not be at risk because somebody, somewhere might be offended.
 

jgoodguy

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imo I think those Confederate soldiers earned and deserve that monument. They marched and fought for their own beliefs and they had to see battle however many times. These people who complain about the monument probably have no idea what these men went through or who they were. Even though the Confederate soldiers are long gone they earned the right for that monument to still stand there.
And people alive today do not have a right to move a monument to dead people.
A rather special application of the term rights.
 

wilber6150

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If you’re going to court and your biggest concern is a statue in front of the court house, you have issues that removing the statue will not resolve.
If you're going to court and have doubts about the odds of receiving a fair trial because of your race, then a statue to the soldiers who fought for a government who wanted to keep you enslaved is certainly not going to ease those feelings..
 

wilber6150

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OK, so I'm offended by the flag of Virginia flying at the Courthouse because it was once carried by Confederate troops. Should it, too, come down?

OK, African Americans certainly have a different view. I freely accept that. Does that mean their view ought to prevail? Why is, for example, their view more important than say, mine, about a Confederate monument?

My point with the Virginia flag is where does it end? Must everyone's fears be catered to?
That depends is your opinion worth anymore then theirs? If this lawyer has clents who are genuinely affected by this statue, then he is doing the right thing by addressing the issue.
 
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That depends is your opinion worth anymore then theirs? If this lawyer has clents who are genuinely affected by this statue, then he is doing the right thing by addressing the issue.
Baloney. The lawyer's client is looking for anything to walk on. He likely couldn't tell you if there ever was a Civil War and less likely to tell you what century it was in.
 

CMWinkler

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That depends is your opinion worth anymore then theirs? If this lawyer has clents who are genuinely affected by this statue, then he is doing the right thing by addressing the issue.
No, my opinion is not more valuable than yours, theirs or even their lawyer's. How his client's are, however, materially affected by the presence of the statue is certainly open to question.
 

wilber6150

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No, my opinion is not more valuable than yours, theirs or even their lawyer's. How his client's are, however, materially affected by the presence of the statue is certainly open to question.
They are certainly open to question, but if he does have clients who are affected by it, then he doing right by them by addressing it..We do not know the racial history of this town or its legal system..For all we know there could have been issues with race and the courts there, and if there was then this statue is an issue...
 



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