Trivia Question 1-8-16 Come Sail Away & Friday Bonus

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Trivia Master

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I started my maritime service as a Revenue Cutter, and was named after an (acting) presidential First Lady. I fired a single, but very significant shot across the bow of the Nashville in Charleston Harbor in April, 1861. I was captured by a Confederate boarding party during the Second Battle of Galveston. Name that ship.

AND

Why was the single shot over the bow of the Nashville significant... and what was the weight designation of the gun that fired it?

credit: @7th Texas Mounted Rifles

Friday bonus:

According to the Dix-Hill Cartel Prisoner Exchange System, signed July 22, 1862, how many privates or common seamen were required for the exchange of one Captain in the Navy or one Colonel?

credit: @chellers
 
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Mark F. Jenkins

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USRC Harriet Lane, later the USS Harriet Lane, later the CSS Harriet Lane, later the Elliot Ritchie.

I know she halted the Nashville with a shot across the bow when that vessel was showing no colors. But I don't know why it's of particular significance (other than the fact that the Nashville then hoisted the Stars and Stripes).

No clue on the bonus... that's the sort of thing I look up instead of carrying around in my head! :confused:
 

1stMN

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The Harriet Lane.

The shot was important because it was the first naval shot of the civil war. The gun load was 32-pound shot.

Bonus question: 15 privates/seamen for a Captain/Colonel.
 
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Harriet Lane
The revenue cutter ordered the vessel to come to and show her colors. The unidentified vessel ignored these signals and continued toward Charleston Harbor. Faunce ordered a 32-pound cannon shot fired across the steamer’s bow, which turned out to be the South Carolina steamship Nashville. Historians consider the shot fired across Nashville’s bow the first naval shot of the Civil War.
Source-http://coastguard.dodlive.mil/2011/04/harriet-lane-fires-first-naval-shot-of-the-civil-war/
Bonus- For example, a naval captain or a colonel in the army would exchange for fifteen privates or common seamen, while personnel of equal ranks would transfer man for man.
Source-wikipedia
 

ErnieMac

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In the early hours of April 12, 1861, Captain John Faunce, commanding the USRC Harriet Lane (later USS Harriet Lane), observed the steamer Nashville attempting to enter Charleston Harbor with no colors flying. Faunce ordered a 32-lb shot to be fired across the Nashville's bow which brought her to a stop. The Nashville eventually raised an American flag and was allowed to proceed into Charleston on her way to becoming a Confederate blockade runner and commerce raider. Faunce's shot is considered the first naval shot of the Civil War.

Bonus: 1 Colonel (Navy Captain) = 15 Privates (Common Seamen).
 
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Regular:
The ship's name was Harriett Lane.
The shot was significant because it was the first naval shot of the Civil War. The gun was a 32 pounder.

"On the evening of the 11th, the Harriet Lane fired on the civilian steamship Nashville when that merchantman appeared with no colors flying. Nashville avoided further attack by promptly hoisting the United States ensign. When Major Robert Anderson surrendered Fort Sumter 13 April, USRC Harriet Lane withdrew with her sister ships. According to Coast Guard historian Captain Commandant Horatio Davis Smith, USRCS, Ret; [5] [6] Lieutenant W. D. Thompson fired the first naval shot of the Civil with the thirty-two pounder he commanded on the deck of the Harriet Lane at the Nashville.[7] [8] [9]"

https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=USRC_Harriet_Lane_(1857)&oldid=685363733

Bonus:
A captain in the Navy or a colonel shall be exchanged for officers of equal rank, or for fifteen privates or common seamen.
https://m.reddit.com/r/AskHistorians/comments/1x3847/before_the_system_broke_down_how_effective_was/
 

caller

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The ship is the Harriet Lane.
The shot, a thirty-two pounder, was significant because it is considered the first shot from the deck of a ship during the Civil War.

Bonus:
15:1 - ex: 15 Privates for 1 Captain
 

CjkCjkCJk

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The ship is the USRC Harriet Lane, You fired the first naval shot of the Civil War and Lieutenant W. D. Thompson fired the first naval shot of the Civil with the thirty-two pounder he commanded on the deck of the Harriet Lane at the Nashville

for the Friday bonus: 15 privates=1 colonel and a Naval Captain
 

Dave G

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The USRC (or USS) Harriet Lane
- significance: first naval shot of the Civil War
- weight designaation: 32 pounder

Bonus: 15 -- One Navy Captain or Colonel was worth 15 privates/seamen
 

Talos

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USS (formerly USRC) Harriet Lane was the ship. The shot she fired at Nashville, with her 4”/30 pounder Parrott on the forecastle, was the first shot fired by the Navy in the war.



At the Battle of Galveston, she was in battle with multiple Confederate ships, but surrendered to the Bayou City after she was boarded by Confederate sailors.



It was 15 privates or common seamen for every Colonel or Navy Captain.

Edit - Talos, your answer to the first question is almost but not quite correct. The gun that fired the shot was a 32-pounder. The Harriet Lane acquired a 30-pounder in 1862, but didn't have it at the time of the action in question.

Your answer to the bonus question is correct.

Welcome to the trivia game. Hope you'll come back and play again.

Hoosier
 
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donna

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Just know that it was the Harriet Lane which was named after President James Buchanan's niece. She was acting first lady for him.

Harriet Lane was rammed by the Confederate steamers Bayou City and Neptune.

Edit - Incomplete answer to the main question. No answer given for the bonus question.

Hoosier
 
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Sbc

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I started my maritime service as a Revenue Cutter, and was named after an (acting) presidential First Lady. I fired a single, but very significant shot across the bow of the Nashville in Charleston Harbor in April, 1861. I was captured by a Confederate boarding party during the Second Battle of Galveston. Name that ship.

AND

Why was the single shot over the bow of the Nashville significant... and what was the weight designation of the gun that fired it?

credit: @7th Texas Mounted Rifles

Friday bonus:

According to the Dix-Hill Cartel Prisoner Exchange System, signed July 22, 1862, how many privates or common seamen were required for the exchange of one Captain in the Navy or one Colonel?

credit: @chellers
US Harriet Lane
Fired 1st naval shot of the war(32 pounder)
15 to 1 exchange rate for prisoners
 
I started my maritime service as a Revenue Cutter, and was named after an (acting) presidential First Lady. I fired a single, but very significant shot across the bow of the Nashville in Charleston Harbor in April, 1861. I was captured by a Confederate boarding party during the Second Battle of Galveston. Name that ship.

AND

Why was the single shot over the bow of the Nashville significant... and what was the weight designation of the gun that fired it?

credit: @7th Texas Mounted Rifles

Friday bonus:

According to the Dix-Hill Cartel Prisoner Exchange System, signed July 22, 1862, how many privates or common seamen were required for the exchange of one Captain in the Navy or one Colonel?

credit: @chellers
The regular Friday question was submitted by me.

BONUS ANSWER: 15
 

Package4

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Harriett Lane, 32pdr, first naval shot of the Civil War

Bonus Question:
The cartel agreement established a scale of equivalents to manage the exchange of military officers and enlisted personnel. A naval captain or a colonel in the army would exchange for fifteen privates or common seamen, while personnel of equal ranks would transfer man for man.
 
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