Trivia Question 1-15-19 Civilian Prisoner of War

Status
Not open for further replies.

Trivia Master

The Keeper of Knowledge
Forum Host
Joined
Mar 21, 2012
Messages
1,839
#1
Who was the Gettysburg civilian, whose property was the site of great carnage and sacrifice, taken prisoner of July 3 and detained during the retreat of the Army of Northern Virginia because of his knowledge of its condition and disposition?

credit: @hughes
 

(Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)
Joined
Jan 6, 2010
Messages
1,663
Location
UK
#5

DBF

Sergeant
Member of the Month
Joined
Aug 6, 2016
Messages
940
#6
According to my source that would by Emanuel G. Trostle. He had been escorted off his family’s property on the 2nd of July, but he tried to sneak back on his property on the 3rd and was detained, it was feared he knew too much about the Confederate Army, although my 1st source states that before his parole could be processed, the shooting started.
History of Cumberland and Adams Counties, Pennsylvania Hardcover; by Beers & Co. Warner, page 454.
 
Joined
Jan 31, 2017
Messages
2,393
#7
When the Confederates left Pennsylvania at the end of the Battle of Gettysburg, they left with eight civilians (not counting the slaves taken):

George Codori, J. Crawford Guinn, Alexander Harper, William Harper, Samuel Pitzer, George Patterson, George Arendt, and Emanuel Trostle.

I'm guessing J. Crawford Guinn is the man who you are thinking of in this question, as there was a Catherine Guinn Farm which was a field hospital at the Battle of Gettysburg.
 
Joined
Nov 26, 2015
Messages
1,204
Location
Greensburg, Pa
#8
Sneaky question as most books don't give concrete reasons on why civilians were taken prisoners. I will go with Emanuel Trostle. However one Gettysburg book I have claims that he was taken prisoner because he disobeyed the confederates after he returned home. But because Trostle went through the confederate lines, he did know more about the confederate army. Something tells me this is an author presuming versus hard evidence. From the link below Brown feels it is Trostle, so Trostle it is.


https://books.google.com/books?id=c...#v=onepage&q=emanuel trostle prisoner&f=false
 
Joined
Aug 25, 2013
Messages
8,403
Location
Hannover, Germany
#9

Jimklag

Lt. Colonel
Silver Patron
Joined
Mar 3, 2017
Messages
9,911
Location
Chicagoland
#10
Several Gettysburg area citizens were captured and made hostages by the rebels after the battle - J. Crawford Gwinn, Alexander Harper, George Codori, William Harper, Samuel Sitzer, George Patterson, George Arendt, and Emanuel Trostle.

The person whose property was the scene of the most carnage was Emanuel Trostle. He would be my choice.
 

MC44

Sergeant
Joined
Sep 15, 2016
Messages
528
Location
Vermont
#11
There are a few names that could fit the bill. All names are synonymous with the Battle and carnage:
George Codori, Samuel Pitzer, and Emmanuel Trostle. Though Pitzer was captured on July 2. Trostle seems to have been taken on the 3rd. Codori was taken prisoner "at the end of the battle."

I will answer Codori. But based on the wording of the question, Trostle could be acceptable.

https://historyarchive.wordpress.co...ian-prisoners-after-the-battle-of-gettysburg/

http://codorifamily.com/jean_george_cordari.html
 

WJC

Brigadier General
Moderator
Thread Medic
Joined
Aug 16, 2015
Messages
11,060
#17
Who was the Gettysburg civilian, whose property was the site of great carnage and sacrifice, taken prisoner of July 3 and detained during the retreat of the Army of Northern Virginia because of his knowledge of its condition and disposition?

credit: @hughes
Emanuel Trostle (1838-1914). Trostle was one of eight local White men and a large but unknown number of Black freemen the rebels captured and forcibly took south when they retreated. The others were George Arendt, George Jean Codori, J. Crawford Gwinn, Alexander Harper, William Harper, George Patterson and Samuel Pitzer (aka Samuel Sitzer).
Trostle was alerted of the danger as the battle raged near his home and given refuge behind the rebel lines by a considerate rebel colonel on July 2, 1863. The next day, concerned about his property, he attempted to leave for home but was arrested because he had seen the condition and disposition of the rebel force. He was imprisoned for twenty-two months.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.


(Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)
Top