“Longstreet at Gettysburg” just released

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Rebforever

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The only time that could have been said was when an old man without his personal records that were sent to a dear friend or destroyed in a fire attempted to set the record straight. Prior to that, no one could accurately acuse him of misrepresentation.
Then he should have kept his mouth shut.
 
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PeterT

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I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It deserves another read and will get one … it goes into the "to be read again" pile. I acquired another 4 Civil War books in Chicago that now require reading. Second hand book stores are a treasure trove for civil war buffs visiting the US (… and those in the USA too I guess).

Now, back to @cpfarr01 and his book. There are many, many quotes (with references and sources identified) throughout the book. I was aware of some of them of course, but listed below are some interesting quotes that I hadn't seen before.

Cory asserts in the chapter, "Lee's Costly Decision", that Lost Cause sympathizers characterised Lee's admission after Pickett's Charge that it "it was all my fault" as another example of his greatness, as these extracts show:

1. John Early Jones (of Jubal Early's staff) wrote in 1880 that Lee "would crucify, on self-erected cross, his own illustrious name" and "the Divinity in his [Lee's] bosom shone translucent through the man, and his spirit rose up to the Godlike".

2. John B. Gordon wrote in 1903 "To those who knew General Lee well, the assumption by him of entire responsibility for the failure at Gettysburg means nothing except an additional and overwhelming proof of his almost marvelous magnanimity".

However, noted author Clifford Dowdey wrote in 1957 "General Lee could not conceivably have believed that the failure of the three-day battle was all his fault".

Longstreet said it simply as " ...'it's all my fault' meant just what it said".

Some more observations will follow.
 

Rebforever

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I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It deserves another read and will get one … it goes into the "to be read again" pile. I acquired another 4 Civil War books in Chicago that now require reading. Second hand book stores are a treasure trove for civil war buffs visiting the US (… and those in the USA too I guess).

Now, back to @cpfarr01 and his book. There are many, many quotes (with references and sources identified) throughout the book. I was aware of some of them of course, but listed below are some interesting quotes that I hadn't seen before.

Cory asserts in the chapter, "Lee's Costly Decision", that Lost Cause sympathizers characterised Lee's admission after Pickett's Charge that it "it was all my fault" as another example of his greatness, as these extracts show:

1. John Early Jones (of Jubal Early's staff) wrote in 1880 that Lee "would crucify, on self-erected cross, his own illustrious name" and "the Divinity in his [Lee's] bosom shone translucent through the man, and his spirit rose up to the Godlike".

2. John B. Gordon wrote in 1903 "To those who knew General Lee well, the assumption by him of entire responsibility for the failure at Gettysburg means nothing except an additional and overwhelming proof of his almost marvelous magnanimity".

However, noted author Clifford Dowdey wrote in 1957 "General Lee could not conceivably have believed that the failure of the three-day battle was all his fault".

Longstreet said it simply as " ...'it's all my fault' meant just what it said".

Some more observations will follow.
Yep, and I guess offering his resignation to President Davis is unbelievable too? Just more revisionism right at the start as usual.
 
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OldReliable1862

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Seeing this thread made me look into getting Glenn Tucker's Gettysburg books. When I look at books on Gettysburg, all the many, many books on the subject tend to run together. At first I didn't pay much attention to Tucker's books: they were 60+ years old, and seeing the phrases "High Tide" or "High Water Mark" typically makes me think, "Older book that may or may not be carrying some serious baggage." Fortunately, it seems Tucker's work helped kick off the "Longstreet Renaissance."
 

cpfarr01

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I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It deserves another read and will get one … it goes into the "to be read again" pile. I acquired another 4 Civil War books in Chicago that now require reading. Second hand book stores are a treasure trove for civil war buffs visiting the US (… and those in the USA too I guess).

Now, back to @cpfarr01 and his book. There are many, many quotes (with references and sources identified) throughout the book. I was aware of some of them of course, but listed below are some interesting quotes that I hadn't seen before.
Thanks, @PeterT. I appreciate your comments and observations on the book. Glad you enjoyed it.
 
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Rebforever

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Not at all unbelievable. This was the measure of the man. He was fallible, vulnerable and capable of making mistakes like any other man. He was not "Godlike".
No one is God like but Jesus Christ. The reverence of General Lee is his presentation of a true Southern Son.
 

James N.

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I can't prove it and don't want too but I too wondered if Tucker didn't start the wave. For those looking for Glenn tucker he has some twenty books/articles. Can't agree with all he said, but he made such sence I always wondered why he is left out historically as a reference. Again I am happy to see a new book on Longstreet. Personally I think that monument to the general at Gettysburg is disrespectful. imho
Tucker's "High Tide at Gettysburg" was one of the first books I read regarding that battle. I had been more concerned with the Western Theater till he sparked an interest in Gettysburg.
Regards
David
Seeing this thread made me look into getting Glenn Tucker's Gettysburg books. When I look at books on Gettysburg, all the many, many books on the subject tend to run together. At first I didn't pay much attention to Tucker's books: they were 60+ years old, and seeing the phrases "High Tide" or "High Water Mark" typically makes me think, "Older book that may or may not be carrying some serious baggage." Fortunately, it seems Tucker's work helped kick off the "Longstreet Renaissance."
I for one have referenced Tucker before here in the forums as the author of the very first book I read on Chickamauga, one that I believe is still in print and sold at the NPS Visitor Center there. And I have the CWTI issue as well!

Chickamauga.jpg
 
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cpfarr01

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For those who are interested:

Here is the Apple iTunes audio version of a book interview that aired on Pennsylvania Cable Network (PCN) “PA Books” in mid-May - https://player.fm/series/pa-books-on-pcn-1204414/longstreet-at-gettysburg-a-critical-reassessment-with-cory-pfarr. I believe you can also find the video on PCN’s website.

I’ll be speaking and signing books in Gettysburg on June 29 and 30. On the 29th for the Gettysburg Foundation’s “Great Conversations” event at the Rupp House History Center. Speech at 2 pm with a signing event to follow. https://www.gettysburgfoundation.org/who-we-are/news/2019-news/great-conversations-at-gettysburg-returns-to-rupp

And then on the 30th at the Gettysburg Heritage Center - Museum. Speech at 4 pm with a signing event to follow. https://www.gettysburgmuseum.com/book-signings---anniversary-weekend-june-30---july-6.html

Also, in next issue of the newly-revamped “North & South” magazine will be an article I wrote discussing the major controversies involving Longstreet from pre-campaign discussions through the second day’s battle. The issue will likely be out in July.

And lastly for now, another article I wrote covering Longstreet’s performance on July 3 will be published in the January 2020 issue of “Gettysburg Magazine.”
 

David H.

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Mr. Pharr:

I have been waiting for the next issue of North and South to hit Barnes and Noble and I am looking forward to reading your article.

I hope your book does well. I have been a supporter of Longstreet for about 20 years. I liked Tucker's book on Lee and Longstreet.

A question on your methodology: did you find new or different sources than previous authors on Longstreet and/or do you apply a different analysis to the sources that other used?
 
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cpfarr01

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Downloaded the kindle version. I really like your overview of what various historians have written about Longstreet and your extensive sourcework. Thanks for writing!
Thanks @Henry Hunt, I appreciate it. Glad you enjoyed the book.

Mr. Pharr:

I have been waiting for the next issue of North and South to hit Barnes and Noble and I am looking forward to reading your article.

I hope your book does well. I have been a supporter of Longstreet for about 20 years. I liked Tucker's book on Lee and Longstreet.

A question on your methodology: did you find new or different sources than previous authors on Longstreet and/or do you apply a different analysis to the sources that other used?
Hi @David H., thanks for your message. Yes, the “North & South” article should be out sometime the middle of this month.

The short answer to your question about methodology and sources is “yes” to both. I was able to find quite a few primary sources that were either overlooked or deliberately left out of past narratives addressing Longstreet’s performance at Gettysburg. Also, based on my research, I think a number of authors up to the present day have engaged in cherry-picking and/or misrepresenting sources, and sometimes have even advanced blatant conjecture untethered from the primary source record. I think the historiographical study of this topic shows that the postwar, anti-Longstreet agenda has clearly been perpetuated by numerous twentieth century and modern authors, which I believe has tainted a significant number of general histories of the battle, especially analysis of the Confederate side.

Thanks for the well wishes. Hope you enjoy the article.
 

John S. Carter

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Hi All,

Just wanted to tip you to my newly-published book, "Longstreet at Gettysburg: A Critical Reassessment.” It was just officially released by McFarland Publishers a few days ago and was a 4+ year project from start to finish. If you’re interested in the topic, listed below is some information on the book and advance reviews.
Thanks, Cory


Description: This is the first book-length, critical analysis of Lieutenant General James Longstreet's actions at the Battle of Gettysburg. The author argues that Longstreet's record has been discredited unfairly, beginning with character assassination by his contemporaries after the war and, persistently, by historians in the decades since. By closely studying the three-day battle, and conducting an incisive historiographical inquiry into Longstreet's treatment by scholars, this book presents an alternative view of Longstreet as an effective military leader, and refutes over a century of negative evaluations of his performance.

Book Notes from “Civil War Books & Authors” (March 12, 2019):
https://cwba.blogspot.com/2019/03/booknotes-longstreet-at-gettysburg.html
“...It certainly does appear to be an exhaustive reevaluation of the many controversies and myths surrounding Longstreet's actions, with the author dissecting on a point by point basis over 150 years of critical interpretation. In the book the author quotes and challenges the views and conclusions expressed in the publications of a host of major modern scholars.”


Advance Reviews:
“Cory M. Pfarr is a worthy successor to Glenn Tucker, providing the most detailed analysis to date of James Longstreet's actions at Gettysburg, the motivations of his postwar critics, and the manner in which bias against Longstreet has influenced histories of the battle down to the present day. This is a welcome addition to the historiography of the most studied military engagement in American history." - William Garrett Piston, author of “Lee's Tarnished Lieutenant: James Longstreet and his Place in Southern History”


"General James Longstreet remains the most controversial Confederate officer to fight at Gettysburg. Surprisingly, no full-length assessment of Longstreet’s Gettysburg record has been produced until now. Cory Pfarr methodically analyzes many of the myths and controversies that surround Lee’s ‘Old War Horse.’ His results challenge popular interpretations that were created by ‘Lost Cause’ advocates and continue among historians to this day. Pfarr’s provocative work will be required reading for all subsequent treatments of Longstreet at Gettysburg." -James A. Hessler, Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide and author of “Sickles at Gettysburg” and “Gettysburg’s Peach Orchard”

"About once each decade an honest work concerning James Longstreet is published. Cory Pfarr has this decade covered. This is the book so many of us have been waiting for. It is certified 'Lost Cause mythology'-free and is the first thoroughly honest account of General James Longstreet's generalship during the Gettysburg Campaign. This book is the long missing piece of the Gettysburg story." -Richard Pilcher, a past president of The Longstreet Society

"'Longstreet at Gettysburg' is a superb counter-stroke to the century-and-a-half of Lost Cause propaganda leveled at General Longstreet over Gettysburg. By confronting and refuting each and every false claim, Cory Pfarr has set the record straight and affirms the tremendous competence Longstreet employed to try and win a battle where the circumstances were stacked against the Confederates. He shows Longstreet’s efforts and results were impressive in the face of difficult odds, and proves Longstreet is one of America’s best war leaders and fighting generals. A tour de force." -Harold M. Knudsen, LTC (Ret.) US Army and author of “General James Longstreet: The Confederacy’s Most Modern General”

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Why did it take so long for this book to be written ? Longstreet has for so long been Lee's
"goat". Starting with his joining the Republican part,as he was the only general to have done this.Then came "Killer Angels" a novel which readers took to be what happen with him and Lee at Gettysburg.Lee called him his "O'WAR HORSE" when afterwards he became the 'O MULE" to those who sought excuses for the loss,He could have be the'O JACKASS' .Maybe Pickett was at least partially correct concerning Lee but no one can question a Lee .
 
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