Recreated “Granula”: 19th Century Granola

Joined
Nov 26, 2016
Messages
5,601
Location
central NC
#1
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In 1863, Dr. James C. Jackson of New York developed what he called "Granula," a Graham flour mixture that was formed into sheets, baked until dry, broken up, baked again and broken up into even smaller pieces. In 1898, Charles W. Post used Dr. Jackson's basic recipe for “Granula” to develop Grape Nuts. Through his smart marketing efforts, granola soon became a success.

"Granula"

Ingredients:
Rolled oats - 3 cups
Almonds - 1 cup — either whole or slivered
Sunflower Seeds - 1/2 cup
Pumpkin Seeds - 1/2 cup
Chia Seeds - 1/4 cup
Ground cinnamon - 1/4 teaspoon
Honey - 1/2 cup
Salt - 1/4 teaspoon
Water - 1/4 cup
Oil - 1/4 cup canola, sunflower or coconut - Avoid olive oil as its flavor may be too strong.
Light brown sugar - 1/4 cup
Pure Vanilla extract - 1/2 teaspoon

Note: You can use different ingredients for flavor and texture — peanuts, cashews, sesame seeds, flakes, figs, chocolate chunks, etc. Make it your own mix.


Directions:
Combine the rolled oats, nuts, seeds, ground cinnamon and salt in a bowl — these are the dry ingredients.

In a small saucepan, add the water, oil, honey, brown sugar, and vanilla extract. Bring this to a boil, stirring continuously. Pour this mixture over the dry ingredients and toss together, ensuring the dry ingredients are coated with the liquid.

Put this mixture into a baking tray that is greased with butter. Spread the mix evenly.

Pre-heat oven to 325 degrees F and bake the mix for about 35 minutes or until golden brown. Stir the mix occasionally so the mixture browns evenly.

Take the tray out of the oven once you’re happy with the golden brown color. The granola mix will be soft and sticky, but will become dry and crisp as it cools. Once the granola has completely cooled, store in an airtight container. You can add raisins, cranberries, blackberries or other nuts to this mix. It will last for several weeks.


This recipe is adapted from The Joy of Baking.

Check out this thread for more on Dr. Jackson and his invention.
https://civilwartalk.com/threads/granula-the-first-ready-to-eat-cereal.75757/#post-516121
 

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Joined
Mar 3, 2017
Messages
9,901
Location
Chicagoland
#4
In 1863, Dr. James C. Jackson of New York developed what he called "Granula," a Graham flour mixture that was formed into sheets, baked until dry, broken up, baked again and broken up into even smaller pieces. In 1898, Charles W. Post used Dr. Jackson's basic recipe for “Granula” to develop Grape Nuts. Through his smart marketing efforts, granola soon became a success.

"Granula"

Ingredients:
Rolled oats - 3 cups
Almonds - 1 cup — either whole or slivered
Sunflower Seeds - 1/2 cup
Pumpkin Seeds - 1/2 cup
Chia Seeds - 1/4 cup
Ground cinnamon - 1/4 teaspoon
Honey - 1/2 cup
Salt - 1/4 teaspoon
Water - 1/4 cup
Oil - 1/4 cup canola, sunflower or coconut - Avoid olive oil as its flavor may be too strong.
Light brown sugar - 1/4 cup
Pure Vanilla extract - 1/2 teaspoon

Note: You can use different ingredients for flavor and texture — peanuts, cashews, sesame seeds, flakes, figs, chocolate chunks, etc. Make it your own mix.


Directions:
Combine the rolled oats, nuts, seeds, ground cinnamon and salt in a bowl — these are the dry ingredients.

In a small saucepan, add the water, oil, honey, brown sugar, and vanilla extract. Bring this to a boil, stirring continuously. Pour this mixture over the dry ingredients and toss together, ensuring the dry ingredients are coated with the liquid.

Put this mixture into a baking tray that is greased with butter. Spread the mix evenly.

Pre-heat oven to 325 degrees F and bake the mix for about 35 minutes or until golden brown. Stir the mix occasionally so the mixture browns evenly.

Take the tray out of the oven once you’re happy with the golden brown color. The granola mix will be soft and sticky, but will become dry and crisp as it cools. Once the granola has completely cooled, store in an airtight container. You can add raisins, cranberries, blackberries or other nuts to this mix. It will last for several weeks.


This recipe is adapted from The Joy of Baking.

Check out this thread for more on Dr. Jackson and his invention.
https://civilwartalk.com/threads/granula-the-first-ready-to-eat-cereal.75757/#post-516121
This sounds like good granola. I am a granola addict.
 
Joined
Aug 25, 2013
Messages
8,527
Location
Hannover, Germany
#9
I love granola too, preferably with Greek yoghurt. When we met with @theoldman last summer in Rapid City and had breakfast together, I had a "Yoghurt Parfait". Parfait here is something frozen, so I was curious and it turned out to be Greek yoghurt, Granola and fresh berries on top. Extremely delicious and I made it at home a few times since and always enjoyed my granola and the memories...
 
Joined
Nov 26, 2016
Messages
5,601
Location
central NC
#11
Thanks for posting! In the recipe, what are/is “rolled oats”?
Rolled oats are referred to by many different names, including oat flakes, rolled oatmeal, or just plain oatmeal. "Rolled" is just a reference to the fact that the whole oat grains are steamed and then rolled to produce flat flakes.
 



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