“Ash” Surname - K Co, 23rd Ky Inf (US)

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Kyle Kalasnik

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Location
Potter County, PA
Good morning,

I am doing some family research on my family and discovered that two (2) of my 4 x Great Uncles served in K Co, 23rd Ky. Joshua G. Ash and George W. Ash.

I was wondering if there is anymore specific information on them as well as if my 3 x Great Grandfather (Thomas Ash) served in that unit, in another Union outfit, or possibly a Confederate unit, or at all.

I appreciate any information that is given. Thank you and have a good day.

Respectfully,
Kyle Kalasnik
 
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Messages
6,662
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
Good morning,

I am doing some family research on my family and discovered that two (2) of my 4 x Great Uncles served in K Co, 23rd Ky. Joshua G. Ash and George W. Ash.

I was wondering if there is anymore specific information on them as well as if my 3 x Great Grandfather (Thomas Ash) served in that unit, in another Union outfit, or possibly a Confederate unit, or at all.

I appreciate any information that is given. Thank you and have a good day.

Respectfully,
Kyle Kalasnik
Welcome, Joshua Ash enlisted 9/11/1861 at Camp King in Covington, Ky. On 1/2/1862 he mustered into Company K 23rd Ky infantry.
He died 10/27/1862 in Louisville, Ky. His father, Andrew applied for a pension in his name 10/26/1876.

George W. Ash enlisted 9/11/1861 at Camp King. Mustered into Company K 1/2/1862. He re-enlisted 1/5/1864. he was wounded 7/27/1864 at Atlanta, Ga. (right leg amputated). He died at Nashville, Tn. 8/13/1864. His widow, Sarah applied for a pension 1/23/1865.

I couldn't find any record Confederate or Union for a Thomas Ash in a Kentucky unit.
 
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Kyle Kalasnik

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Welcome, Joshua Ash enlisted 9/11/1861 at Camp King in Covington, Ky. On 1/2/1862 he mustered into Company K 23rd Ky infantry.
He died 10/27/1862 in Louisville, Ky. His father, Andrew applied for a pension in his name 10/26/1876.

George W. Ash enlisted 9/11/1861 at Camp King. Mustered into Company K 1/2/1862. He re-enlisted 1/5/1864. he was wounded 7/27/1864 at Atlanta, Ga. (right leg amputated). He died at Nashville, Tn. 8/13/1864. His widow, Sarah applied for a pension 1/23/1865.

I couldn't find any record Confederate or Union for a Thomas Ash in a Kentucky unit.
East Tennessee Roots,

Thank you so much, I really appreciate it.

I do have one question though, where did you get your information, as I would love to try and find out more about other ancestors and their possible participation in the Civil War. Thank you again.

Respectfully,
Kyle Kalasnik
 
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Messages
6,662
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
East Tennessee Roots,

Thank you so much, I really appreciate it.

I do have one question though, where did you get your information, as I would love to try and find out more about other ancestors and their possible participation in the Civil War. Thank you again.

Respectfully,
Kyle Kalasnik
You're very welcome ! http://civilwardata.com/ This is a source I've used for years. The price is well worth it. If you'll post here at "Researching Your Civil War Ancestry" forum, I'm confident someone would probably find more info for you. In fact I'm going to try to find the index cards for the two pensions mentioned and post them.
 
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Messages
6,662
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
East Tennessee Roots,

Thank you so much, I really appreciate it.

I do have one question though, where did you get your information, as I would love to try and find out more about other ancestors and their possible participation in the Civil War. Thank you again.

Respectfully,
Kyle Kalasnik
Here ya go ! The National Archives will copy the entire pension, for a price of course ! probably be a wealth of info ! Their Compiled Service Records should be available at Fold 3.



joshua ash.png

george w ash.png
 
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Joined
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Messages
6,662
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
East Tennessee Roots,

Thank you so much, I really appreciate it.

I do have one question though, where did you get your information, as I would love to try and find out more about other ancestors and their possible participation in the Civil War. Thank you again.

Respectfully,
Kyle Kalasnik
Here's after action reports for the 23rd at Stone's River and Chickamauga

Stone's River after battle report:

Report of Maj. Thomas H. Hamrick, Twenty-third Kentucky Infantry.

HDQRS. TWENTY-THIRD INFANTRY,
Camp in front of Murfreesborough, Tenn., January 5, 1863
SIR: I hereby beg leave to make my report of the part taken by the
Twenty-third Kentucky Infantry in the two battles before
Murfreesborough, December 31, 1863:

On December 26, 1862, we left our camp near Nashville with 282 men,
and took up our line of march with the brigade, under the command of
Col. William Grose, in the rear of the Sixth Ohio. Halted near La
Vergne at dusk, where we bivouacked during the night.

On the morning of the 27th, my regiment was detailed as guard to
Gen. Palmer's division train. At night we took up our position with
the brigade.

On the 28th (Sunday), we moved to the front with our brigade, and
were placed as reserve to the Eighty-fourth Illinois.

On the 29th, we moved forward, crossed Stewart's Creek, waist-deep,
and followed the Eighty-fourth Illinois in line of battle. Remained in
front all night with the brigade.

On the 30th, I was ordered forward some 400 yards, to support
Parsons' (regular) battery, on the right, where we remained until dark,
when we were relieved, and ordered some 400 yards to the rear and into
the timber, for rest.

On the 31st (Wednesday), I was ordered to form in line on the left of
the Sixth Ohio, fronting the enemy's battery in front, when, the fire
becoming heavy upon our right and rear, Col. Grose ordered me to
change my front, which I immediately did, facing the direction of the
enemy's fire, when I was ordered to unsling knapsacks. I was then
ordered to move forward and support the Sixth Ohio, which I did,
moving as far as the skirt of the wood on my left, when Gen.
Palmer rode up and ordered me to retire to the support of Parsons' battery.

At this time the stampede from the right became general from the woods
in our front. I had some fear of being carried away with it, but found
no difficulty in moving my men to the support of the battery, forming
my right on the battery, and my left resting on the wood. The enemy
appeared on our front, and poured in a galling fire upon us, with the
intention, it seemed, to charge the battery. Some regiment formed upon
my left, resting in the woods. The battery opened a cross-fire upon the
enemy, as did also my regiment and the one upon my left, driving him
back in great confusion and with heavy loss. The battery retired, when
I was ordered to change my front and form behind a ledge of rocks,
and cause my men to lie down and await the approach of the enemy.
The enemy's fire becoming very heavy, I was ordered to fall back with
my command to the railroad in rear of the Twenty-fourth Ohio, which
I did slowly and in good order.

After remaining there for some thirty minutes, I was ordered to move
forward and relieve the Twenty-fourth Ohio, whose ammunition was
exhausted. This I did under a heavy fire from the enemy. That position
I held for fifty-five minutes, driving the enemy back with my superior
guns under cover of the woods, when we were relieved and ordered to
the rear for ammunition.

At 5.30 p.m. I was again ordered to the front, when I took the position
in the wood, in front of the railroad, occupied by me before I was
ordered to the rear, which point I occupied until I was relieved, at 1
a.m., when I was again ordered to the rear for refreshments and rest.

On January 1, I was ordered to the rear and center of Van Cleve's and
Wood's divisions, where I remained until 12 m., when I was ordered
to cross the river to our left, where I remained until 2.30 p.m., when
I was ordered to recross the river and go into camp for a night's rest.

On January 2, I was again ordered with the brigade to cross the river,
when Col. Grose ordered me to take a position behind a fence, on
the extreme front and left. I threw out three companies as skirmishers.
I remained in position until 3.30 p.m., when the enemy appeared,
driving back the forces on my right. The Fifty-ninth Ohio broke and
ran across my front and some of them over my men, who were lying
behind the fence in line. I saw that the enemy were driving back the
forces upon my right, so I changed my front and opened upon him. I
had no sooner done so than a battery opened upon my left with grape,
and at the same time a fire of small-arms was opened upon my left and
rear, placing me within a cross-fire. I then attempted to move my men
back to the brigade, when some stragglers raised the cry, "We are
surrounded." and I found it was impossible to keep my men in order.
They then fell back in confusion. I succeeded in rallying most of them
in the woods on the left of the brigade. The balance, with a few
exceptions, rallied and returned.

The enemy was then driven back with heavy loss. I then moved
forward beyond my original position, keeping open a heavy fire upon him.

When we halted we were 500 yards in advance and to the right of our
original position, and occupying the ground of our former picket line,
which position we held until dark when, being relieved, we returned to
our position occupied before the engagement, having lost in the two
days' engagements 8 killed, 51 wounded, and 22 missing.

Chaplain William H. Black deserves especial praise for the manner in
which he acted being always at his post, and rendering aid and comfort
to the wounded, both while the fight was going on and during the two
succeeding nights. Dr. A. M. Morrison, also deserves great praise for
his kindness and attention to the wounded at all hours, day and night.

My officers, line and staff, acted with great coolness and bravery, with
a few exceptions, which I cannot particularize in this report.

I have the honor to remain, your most obedient servant,

THOMAS H. HAMRICK,
Maj., Cmdg. Regt.

Capt. R. SOUTHGATE,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-Gen., Third Brig. Second Div.

Source: Official Records
CHAP. XXXII.] THE STONE'S RIVER CAMPAIGN. PAGE 569-29
[Series I. Vol. 20. Part I, Reports. Serial No. 29.]

******************************************************************************

Chickamagua after battle report:

Report of Lieut. Col. James C. Foy, Twenty-third Kentucky Infantry.

HDQRS. TWENTY-THIRD REGT. KENTUCKY VOL. INFTY.
Camp near Chattanooga, Tenn., September 27, 1863.
SIR: About 2 a. m. of the 4th instant, Lieut. Livezey, aide-de-camp to
Col. William Grose, commanding our brigade, came to me as we lay in
bivouac near Battle Creek, with orders for me to arouse my men and
proceed to cross the Tennessee River. My instructions were to cross one-half
the regiment at that point and march with the remainder some 1 1/2 miles
below to Battle Creek, where Col. Grose had crossed most of the brigade.
The same orders were repeated to me in a few minutes by Capt. Brooks,
inspector of our brigade. The men were instantly awoke and formed in
marching order. The evening before, I, according to orders received through
Lieut. Boice, aide-de-camp to Col. Grose, had sent three companies to
the river to assist the battery in crossing. The companies on that duty were
Company D, Capt. William Boden; Company E, Capt. John Barnes, and
Company F, First Lieut. J. P. Duke. On arriving at the river I found
that one of these companies had already crossed, and immediately ordered
out
Company H, Capt. Tifft, and Company I, Capt. Black, to cross here, and
placed the whole under the command of Capt. T. J. Williams, who was
assisting me in the capacity of acting major. With the other four companies,
A, B, K, and C, I proceeded down to the designated point, Company G
being detached as guard to the ammunition train.

We soon arrived at the crossing, and reported to Col. Grose, whom I found
superintending the crossing of the brigade in person. We were ordered to get
an old scow loose that had been run on a snag, which was not accomplished
without some difficulty. In the meantime, as soon as any of the small boats
would arrive, I had them filled, and placed the first load in charge of Maj.
G. W. Northup. I remained behind myself to assist the others off until every
man had crossed except the chaplain and a few of the hospital department.

On arriving at the opposite bank a little before sunrise, Capt. William
reported to me that the companies under his charge had all crossed in safety.
I ordered him to remain where he was until I could get word from Col.
Grose. I then marched the four companies that were with me back from the
river into a grove of trees, where we got breakfast about 8.30 a. m. I
received orders, through Capt. G. M. Graves, acting assistant
adjutant-general of Col. Grose's brigade, to collect my men together. I
immediately dispatched Maj. G. W. Northup for the four companies in
charge of Capt. Williams. They joined us about 9.30 a. m. WE lay there
until about 1 p. m., when we, in connection with the other regiments of the
brigade, went into camp close to Shellmound, 7 miles distant from the place
of crossing the river.

September 5.--Left Camp Shellmound about 3.30 p. m. and marched toward
Chattanooga on the road running along the river. Passed the burned bridge
and camped about 8 miles, at 9.30 p. m., in a corn-field, called Camp
Whiteside.

September 6.--Continued our line of march, starting about 7 a. m. Halted
about 12 m. Bivouacked in an orchard on the left of the road. Were now
within 4 miles of Trenton, Ga. The place of our camp was called
Squirreltown Spring. We crossed the Tennessee line into Georgia about 9 a.
m. this day.

September 7.--Remained at this place all this day.

September 8.--Reveille at 2 a. m. We were in motion precisely at 3 a. m.
Marched until 6.30 a. m., when we halted and kept the men under arms all
day. Hawkins' Station about 4 miles distant. That night I received orders
from Col. Grose in person that he intended to start the next morning on a
reconnaissance up the Lookout Mountain; that he would start at 4 a. m. and
wound expect to take my regiment with him in connection with the
Twenty-fourth Ohio and Eighty-fourth Illinois. Accordingly, at 4 a. m. we
fell in line and moved off. On our arrival at the foot of the mountain, distant
from our place of bivouac 2 miles, the Eighty-fourth Illinois was left there
to protect our rear, while the Twenty-fourth Ohio led the advance up to the
summit, followed close by my regiment. The skirmishers of the
Twenty-fourth Ohio drove in the enemy's outposts, wounding 1 man that we
know of. On hearing the enemy's fire I hastened my men up the mountain.
Col. Grose ordered me to take my position on the right of Twenty-fourth
Ohio, and to throw out one company as skirmishers, which I immediately
did. I ordered Capt. Hardiman, commanding Company B, to deploy his
company well to the right, which he did. We now stood in line of battle for
a few moments. No seeing or hearing any more from the enemy, Col. Grose
ordered me to throw up temporary breastworks. This was quickly done.
After lying there about two hours we moved forward along the crest of the
mountain, arriving at Point Lookout about 11.30 a. m. We found no enemy
in force on the mountain, and now from this point could be distinctly seen
the dust from the enemy's column moving out from Chattanooga. The
colonel commanding decided on giving us a little rest for a few hours. WE
started down the mountain between 1 and 2 p. m., leaving Chattanooga to
our left. Went into bivouac near Rossville, distant about 4 miles from
Chattanooga, and in the State of Georgia.

September 10.--Marched from camp on the Ringgold road. The skirmishers
of the First Brigade were driven back by the rebels at------. My regiment
was ordered forward at double-quick. I threw out Company B, Capt.
Hardiman, and Company D, Capt. Boden, as skirmishers here. We
proceeded forward in line of battle with our right resting on the road,
connecting, with the left of the Thirty-first Indiana, in Gen. Cruft's brigade.
WE skirmished all the afternoon, driving the enemy's skirmishers before us.
Returned and bivouacked on the enemy's camp ground 1 1/2 miles west of
Graysville.

September 11.--Left camp about 6.30 a. m. Started on the Ringgold road,
via Graysville. Arrived at Ringgold about 12m. Halted and went into bivouac
close to the town.

September 12.--left camp a little after sunrise by the road to La Fayette. At
10 a. m. halted, distant 5 miles from Ringgold, and formed line of battle,
with our left resting on the road. I sent out the two left companies forward
on the road as outposts. They were stationed by Col. Grose. Heard
skirmishing to our left. We were under arms here all the time until about 4
p. m., when we marched out, bivouacked some 3 miles ahead in a
corn-field, where it was said that Gen. Polk's corps had passed the night
before. This was on the Chickamauga Creek, which was about one-quarter
of a mile from the camp, and immediately opposite Lee and Gordon's Mills
on the east side.

September 13.--We were up and stood in line of battle from 3 a. m. until
daylight, when we proceeded to get breakfast. About 7 a. m. we were
startled by heavy skirmishing in our front. The regiment formed line of
battle instantly, and was ordered by Col. Grose to take position about 200
yards to the rear of the Eighty-fourth Illinois, with our left almost connecting
with the Thirty-sixth Indiana. WE remained in this position and under arms
all day.

September 14.--Received orders from Col. Grose to be ready to march at a
moment's notice. This was about 3.30 a. m. Started in connection with the
brigade about sunrise. Crossed the Chickamauga at Lee and Gordon's Mills,
marched about 10 miles in a southwesterly direction, and bivouacked in
Chattanooga Valley, about 12 miles from Chattanooga.

September 15.--Reveille at 3 a. m. Started at 5 a. m., retracing our way
toward Lee and Gordon's Mills, but turned off the right. Halted about 9.30
a. m. for water at Crawfish Spring. After resting a short time, resumed the
march and halted at 12 m. on the bank of Chickamauga Creek, south of Lee
and Gordon's Mills and 6 miles above.

September 16.--Prospect of staying here. Had the camp well cleaned up
under the supervision of Lieut. J. P. Duke, as officer of the day.

September 17.--There was considerable firing on our pickets last night and
early this morning. The rebel pickets made a heavy dash on Gen. Hazen's
brigade, which was camped on our right. I was immediately on my horse
and had the regiment ready to move. Col. Grose came down, and the firing
not continuing, we were ordered to get our breakfast and be ready to move.
Not hearing anything now of the enemy, I had a hastily constructed
breastwork of logs thrown up on the bank of the stream. This evening moved
camp about 3 miles toward Lee and Gordon's Mills and bivouacked in an
open field.

September 18.--Lay here until 3 p. m. Moved out and relieved the Eight
Kentucky of Gen. Van Cleve's division. WE formed line of battle to the left
of the Sixth Ohio, our right resting close to a farm-house 4 miles from Lee
and Gordon's Mills. According to orders, I sent out company H, Capt. Tifft,
and Company F, First Lieut. J. P. Duke, to relieve two companies of
the Eight Kentucky, who were out as skirmishers. Our skirmishers saw the
rebels plainly and drove their line back, until I had to send word for them
to fall back and act as pickets for the regiment. At 12 o'clock midnight we
were relieved by the Fifteenth Kentucky. After some little delay, the brigade
proceeded toward Lee and Gordon's Mills, where we arrived about daylight
on the morning of the 19th.

September 19.--We had scarcely breakfasted when our brigade was in motion
again, going out the Rossville road. WE numbered for duty 240 enlisted
men, 23 officers; aggregate, 263.

(I should have mentioned above, that on crossing the Tennessee River I had
300 men; [but] through sickness and [those] necessarily with the teams left
behind, the regiment [was reduced] to the above number.)
We proceeded down this road about 3 miles, throwing out Company I, Capt.
Black, and Company C, First Lieut. Hudson, as skirmishers, when we
turned to the right of the road, marching down 700 yards and formed line
of battle on the right of the Thirty-sixth Indiana, and 350 yards to the rear
of the Eighty-fourth Illinois battery being behind the Eighty-fourth Illinois,
and they had proceeded bus a short distance when the battle commenced by
some other troops on our left and front. WE proceeded cautiously along in
the direction of the battle-ground, but just before we reached the conflict I
was ordered to march my regiment by the left flank back to the road we had
come on, the other regiments of the brigade following. Col. Grose has just
received orders from Gen. Palmer, commanding the division, to march his
brigade back. Before we had got quite back we were met by Gen. Palmer
and were turned toward the field of battle again. WE arrived on the
battle-ground a little before 11 a. m. My regiment was posted to the left of
the Twenty-fourth Ohio, about 30 paces, Russell's battery a little to our rear,
the Second Kentucky about 100 yards in advance and to our left. The battle
was now raging warmly. The battery to our rear was pouring a destructive
fire into their ranks, while the Second Kentucky to our left, the
Twenty-fourth Ohio on our right, and the Twenty-third Kentucky poured in
volley after volley. After we had been in this position about one-half to
three-quarters of an hour, I noticed that the enemy were renewing the attack
with redoubled vigor. The Second Kentucky retired step by step and inch by
inch until they arrived on a line with us. At this instant I noticed the
Twenty-fourth Ohio giving slowly back. I immediately
sent an officer to see what was the matter. He brought the word back "all
right" and that they intended to hold their ground. We now fought, I
suppose, for about an hour longer, but right in the midst of the fighting,
finding out that the artillery to our rear was wounding some of the men in
the right companies, I moved the regiment by the left flank until they formed
with the Second Kentucky. The storm of battle now somewhat ceased. We
renewed our ammunition, marched to pass lines to the rear, which was done
in good order, the Eighty-fourth Illinois relieving us. We had scarcely fallen
back when the enemy redoubled their attack with great fury.

It was now plain that they were moving men to our right. We immediately
changed front toward our right with the left company resting where the right
had been. This threw the Twenty-fourth Ohio in our front about 100 yards.
We were ordered to lie down. The attack was now made on the
Twenty-fourth Ohio, this time still stronger than before, and here allow me
to bear testimony to the bravery of that little regiment. I do not think any
regiment that day was under a more galling fire than they were; yet they
stood as if every man was a hero for the space of half an hour; then they fell
back step by step until they were in the rear of our regiment. I then ordered
my men to rise up and open fire, which they did with a cheer. The
Twenty-fourth Ohio halted in our rear, and now, side by side and shoulder
to shoulder, did the Twenty-fourth Ohio and Twenty-third Kentucky stand
up and successively repulse the enemy in all his attacks.

The fire now was very hot. It appeared to me as though every third man in
the regiment was struck. I was struck on the right breast, the bullet going
through the lapels of my overcoat, and struck a large button, glancing off,
doing no injury. I kept my eyes watching well the enemy, while the two
regiments were there bravely fighting. I noticed the enemy had worked
round our right, we having no protection there, and were now pouring a
heavy cross-fire into our ranks. One or two of the captains had suggested to
me that we had better retire. I thought we would have to, but hesitated about
giving the command.

Finally, seeing we were outnumbered, as I thought by the length of their line
of battle, at least five to one, I very reluctantly gave the command to retire,
which we did, and took a new position about 300 to 400 yards to the rear,
and close to Cockerill's battery, belonging to Gen. Hazen's brigade. WE
now rested until sundown, marched down into the woods, and bivouacked
for the night. I found my loss to be 1 officer killed, 3 officers wounded, and
42 enlisted men wounded and 9 killed.

Next morning, September 20, we threw up some slight breastworks, but
about 8 a. m. we had to march out an open field, and then formed in double
column on the center, about 350 yards to the rear of Gen. Hazen's brigade.
I had not been in this position more than twenty minutes, when I was
ordered, through Lieut. Livezey, aide-de-camp to Col. Grose, to report
with my regiment to Gen. Hazen. On reporting to the general, he ordered
me to extend the line of the Sixth Kentucky on their right, which placed me
to the rear of the One hundred and twenty-fourth Ohio, about 100 yards,
whom we were to support, they being stationed behind some breastworks
that Gen. Hazen had had the prudence to erect, I suppose, the night before.
The battle now commenced by a terrific
attack on our front and left. We lay flat on the ground, the bullets flying
over us in all directions. The regiment at the breastworks did well, and
successfully repulsed the enemy.

After about three-quarters of an hour we were ordered up to the works. I
had 3 men wounded while we were lying down. The men knelt down behind
the breastworks, and volley after volley did we pour into the enemy's ranks,
one regiment always reserving it fire until the other had loaded. The whole
left of our army was turned at one time it the morning, but so well did this
brigade do its duty behind the line of breastworks the general had erected,
that I have no doubt they saved a portion of the army from premature rout.
We remained in this position until about 4 p. m., successfully repulsing
every attack made on us. We were now ordered to change front to the right.
After being in this position half an hour we were ordered back to the
breastworks. The storm of battle had now ceased on our left and front, but
off to the right it was renewed with increased vigor. There was now
considerable changing round of troops. Gen. Hazen, with his entire brigade,
moved off in the direction of the enemy's left to attack them, leaving orders
with me to hold the breastworks at all hazards. We were now joined by the
Seventy-fifth Indiana. At this time there was no firing where we were, only
by the sharpshooters of the enemy. The battle on our right now waxed
warmer and warmer. At times it would seem as if it would recede from us,
and then again it would come up nearly to where we lay. By this time it was
plain that the tide of battle was going against us. The Seventy-fifth Indiana
had been moved away to another part of the field, and our little regiment
was all that was left in the breastworks, where a whole brigade of five
regiments had done battle in the morning.

After receiving my orders from Gen. Hazen, Gen. Palmer rode along and
told us about the same thing, adding that we were no to leave there until he
gave the order. Soon we could see our men, line after line, give way on the
right. At length the whole line to my right appeared to be falling back fast.
The battery that was with us at this instant hitched up and drove off. I
looked toward the left. Gen. Cruft was slowly retiring his brigade.

Maj. G. W. Northup now came up to me with an order from Col. Grose to
follow the battery that had just left. I proceeded to move off by the right
flank by file right. I soon saw there was great danger of being thrown into
confusion in marching by the flank. I then formed into columns of
companies as we marched, and proceeded across the field. I could see no
organized body of troops but our regiment and Gen. Cruft with his brigade,
who were retiring in excellent order on our then right. I approached the
general and asked him what was best to be done. He told me he intended to
halt as soon as he reached the woods, and try and rally some of the broken
regiments that were leaving the field in disorder. I told him then that I would
report to him with my regiment for duty. As soon as we reached the edge
of the woods we halted. The general finding this was too close to the
enemy's fire to rally any of the scattered men, he moved on with his brigade
to the top of a high hill about 1 1/2 miles from the battle-field, where he
halted for the space of one or two hours, collecting the remains of different
regiments together. We now proceeded down hill. At the foot of the hill I
saw Col. Grose, and then joined our brigade and proceeded to the vicinity
of Rossville, near Chattanooga, where we bivouacked for the night.

September 21.--We marched out the Rossville road about 2 1/2 miles,
ascended a point of the mountain to the north of the road. We lay on the
west side of the mountain until about 3 p. m.; were ordered to the top of the
mountain and placed behind some breastworks to the left of the Forty-first
Ohio. Very little firing was done here, except by an occasional sharpshooter.
About midnight we moved down the hill and bivouacked in our present camp
from that time until now. Since then our duty has been varied, such as picket
and outpost duty, standing at arms, resting, and working on the breastworks.

I have forgotten to mention the casualties of the 20th. They were as follows:

One man killed, 3 wounded, which make a total of casualties of 1 officer
killed, 9 enlisted men killed, 3 officers wounded, and 45 enlisted men
wounded and 9 enlisted men missing. There are 10 or 12 others wounded in
the regiment, but their wounds being so slight, they being all able for duty,
I thought it unnecessary to report them. There are only nine companies of
the regiment, the other company being detached as train guard.

And now, in conclusion, allow me to express publicly my warmest thanks
to both men and officers for the promptness and alacrity with which they
obeyed every order; also, for the cool courage with which they faced the
enemy in the battles of the two days.

Where all did well it is hard to particularize. I must thank Capt. Tifft for his
undaunted courage on both days. I also return my thanks for the assistance
rendered me in the management of the regiment by Maj. G. W. Northup,
Capt. T. J. Williams, acting major, and Adjt. W. H. Mundy. I feel grateful
to Capt. Hardiman and Lieut. J. P. Duke for the prompt assistance
rendered me. Lieut. Henry G. Shiner, of Company B, who was
wounded in Saturday's fight, I cannot speak too highly of-his qualities as a
soldier and an officer, ever ready to obey and yield me all the assistance in
his power, whether it was on the march or in the bivouac. I know that the
services of an officer like him can never be repaid, but he has my best
wishes for his speedy recovery. For Lieut. J. C. Hoffman and the brave
men who fell I drop a silent tear.

One word now for the enlisted men. No men could fight better; not only my
own men, but all that came under my observation, and too much credit
cannot be given to the private soldiers for the fortitude, bravery, and
unparalleled heroism displayed by them. I had almost forgotten our worthy
chaplain, Rev. William H. Black, whose place here, as at Stone's River, was
in hospital, and visiting wounded soldiers. I know that many of the wounded,
both in this and the battle of Stone's River, have had cause to bless his
name, as he worked with his own hands to administer to them what relief
was in his power. In the name of the sick and wounded soldiers, I publicly
return him my thanks for favors bestowed on them; also, to Surgeons
Morrison and Hasbrouck, who, in their department, I know labored to
alleviate the suffering of the wounded soldiers consigned to their charge.
Herewith Inclose you a list of the casualties.*

I remain, sir, very respectfully, yours, &c.,

JAS. C. FOY,
Lieut.-Col., Comdg. 23d Regt. Kentucky Vols.

Col. W. GROSE, Comdg. Third Brigade.

Source: Official Records
PAGE 789-50 KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., N. ALA., AND N. GA. [CHAP. XLII.
[Series I. Vol. 30. Part I, Reports. Serial No. 50.]

**********************************************************************************
 

lelliott19

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Their Compiled Service Records should be available at Fold 3.
Hello @Kyle Kalasnik and welcome to Civil War Talk - the best place on the internet for Civil War discussion. Happy to have you aboard.

Carded records for George W Ash (CoK/23rd KY) from Fold 3 attached. The file should contain 45 pages.

Carded records for Joshua G Ash (CoK/23rd KY) attached. The file should contain 22 pages.
 

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lelliott19

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I was wondering if there is anymore specific information on them as well as if my 3 x Great Grandfather (Thomas Ash) served in that unit, in another Union outfit, or possibly a Confederate unit, or at all.
Kyle - do you know if your 3x great grandfather was William Thomas Ash? There's a Wm T Ash listed as Pvt, Co K, 23rd KY age 21. Would that be him? Or perhaps another relative?
 

John Hartwell

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The complete Widow's Pension file of George W. Ash's widow, Sarah Ann, is available at fold3.com. It contains 50 pages of documents. I would be happy to download and send them to you, but this is one of the cases in which files have to be downloaded one page at a time (usually, you can download the complete file as a pdf). Fold3 is a pay-site, but I believe you can sign up for a it, and cancel your subscription before the "free trial" period is up, without charge.

The citation is under "Widows' Pensions" at: https://www.fold3.com/browse/249/h3sRqE4nQPSBO3rkk1YHdo5zibXEGeKCgjOSxayK1TaYO1XLA

If you decide not to do that, let me know, and I will go through and select pages with important information to send you.
Attached below are pages 3-6 of the file (pages 1 & 2 are just cover and title -- no vital information): thee we learn he died "of wounds received in front of Atlanta, Ga. ... in a skirmish with the Rebels in the line of duty, and from the effects of which he died in Nashville, Tenn."

cheers!
jno
 

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Kyle Kalasnik

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Potter County, PA
Kyle - do you know if your 3x great grandfather was William Thomas Ash? There's a Wm T Ash listed as Pvt, Co K, 23rd KY age 21. Would that be him? Or perhaps another relative?
Thanks for your help, but I don’t think that is him. He was born in 1833. But I just find it odd that he didn’t serve and his brothers did.
 
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Kyle Kalasnik

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Joined
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Messages
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Location
Potter County, PA
The complete Widow's Pension file of George W. Ash's widow, Sarah Ann, is available at fold3.com. It contains 50 pages of documents. I would be happy to download and send them to you, but this is one of the cases in which files have to be downloaded one page at a time (usually, you can download the complete file as a pdf). Fold3 is a pay-site, but I believe you can sign up for a it, and cancel your subscription before the "free trial" period is up, without charge.

The citation is under "Widows' Pensions" at: https://www.fold3.com/browse/249/h3sRqE4nQPSBO3rkk1YHdo5zibXEGeKCgjOSxayK1TaYO1XLA

If you decide not to do that, let me know, and I will go through and select pages with important information to send you.
Attached below are pages 3-6 of the file (pages 1 & 2 are just cover and title -- no vital information): thee we learn he died "of wounds received in front of Atlanta, Ga. ... in a skirmish with the Rebels in the line of duty, and from the effects of which he died in Nashville, Tenn."

cheers!
jno
Thank, I appreciate all your help. Don’t trouble yourself with the files. I’m going to take care of it. But I appreciate your help.
 

Kyle Kalasnik

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Messages
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Potter County, PA
Here's after action reports for the 23rd at Stone's River and Chickamauga

Stone's River after battle report:

Report of Maj. Thomas H. Hamrick, Twenty-third Kentucky Infantry.

HDQRS. TWENTY-THIRD INFANTRY,
Camp in front of Murfreesborough, Tenn., January 5, 1863
SIR: I hereby beg leave to make my report of the part taken by the
Twenty-third Kentucky Infantry in the two battles before
Murfreesborough, December 31, 1863:

On December 26, 1862, we left our camp near Nashville with 282 men,
and took up our line of march with the brigade, under the command of
Col. William Grose, in the rear of the Sixth Ohio. Halted near La
Vergne at dusk, where we bivouacked during the night.

On the morning of the 27th, my regiment was detailed as guard to
Gen. Palmer's division train. At night we took up our position with
the brigade.

On the 28th (Sunday), we moved to the front with our brigade, and
were placed as reserve to the Eighty-fourth Illinois.

On the 29th, we moved forward, crossed Stewart's Creek, waist-deep,
and followed the Eighty-fourth Illinois in line of battle. Remained in
front all night with the brigade.

On the 30th, I was ordered forward some 400 yards, to support
Parsons' (regular) battery, on the right, where we remained until dark,
when we were relieved, and ordered some 400 yards to the rear and into
the timber, for rest.

On the 31st (Wednesday), I was ordered to form in line on the left of
the Sixth Ohio, fronting the enemy's battery in front, when, the fire
becoming heavy upon our right and rear, Col. Grose ordered me to
change my front, which I immediately did, facing the direction of the
enemy's fire, when I was ordered to unsling knapsacks. I was then
ordered to move forward and support the Sixth Ohio, which I did,
moving as far as the skirt of the wood on my left, when Gen.
Palmer rode up and ordered me to retire to the support of Parsons' battery.

At this time the stampede from the right became general from the woods
in our front. I had some fear of being carried away with it, but found
no difficulty in moving my men to the support of the battery, forming
my right on the battery, and my left resting on the wood. The enemy
appeared on our front, and poured in a galling fire upon us, with the
intention, it seemed, to charge the battery. Some regiment formed upon
my left, resting in the woods. The battery opened a cross-fire upon the
enemy, as did also my regiment and the one upon my left, driving him
back in great confusion and with heavy loss. The battery retired, when
I was ordered to change my front and form behind a ledge of rocks,
and cause my men to lie down and await the approach of the enemy.
The enemy's fire becoming very heavy, I was ordered to fall back with
my command to the railroad in rear of the Twenty-fourth Ohio, which
I did slowly and in good order.

After remaining there for some thirty minutes, I was ordered to move
forward and relieve the Twenty-fourth Ohio, whose ammunition was
exhausted. This I did under a heavy fire from the enemy. That position
I held for fifty-five minutes, driving the enemy back with my superior
guns under cover of the woods, when we were relieved and ordered to
the rear for ammunition.

At 5.30 p.m. I was again ordered to the front, when I took the position
in the wood, in front of the railroad, occupied by me before I was
ordered to the rear, which point I occupied until I was relieved, at 1
a.m., when I was again ordered to the rear for refreshments and rest.

On January 1, I was ordered to the rear and center of Van Cleve's and
Wood's divisions, where I remained until 12 m., when I was ordered
to cross the river to our left, where I remained until 2.30 p.m., when
I was ordered to recross the river and go into camp for a night's rest.

On January 2, I was again ordered with the brigade to cross the river,
when Col. Grose ordered me to take a position behind a fence, on
the extreme front and left. I threw out three companies as skirmishers.
I remained in position until 3.30 p.m., when the enemy appeared,
driving back the forces on my right. The Fifty-ninth Ohio broke and
ran across my front and some of them over my men, who were lying
behind the fence in line. I saw that the enemy were driving back the
forces upon my right, so I changed my front and opened upon him. I
had no sooner done so than a battery opened upon my left with grape,
and at the same time a fire of small-arms was opened upon my left and
rear, placing me within a cross-fire. I then attempted to move my men
back to the brigade, when some stragglers raised the cry, "We are
surrounded." and I found it was impossible to keep my men in order.
They then fell back in confusion. I succeeded in rallying most of them
in the woods on the left of the brigade. The balance, with a few
exceptions, rallied and returned.

The enemy was then driven back with heavy loss. I then moved
forward beyond my original position, keeping open a heavy fire upon him.

When we halted we were 500 yards in advance and to the right of our
original position, and occupying the ground of our former picket line,
which position we held until dark when, being relieved, we returned to
our position occupied before the engagement, having lost in the two
days' engagements 8 killed, 51 wounded, and 22 missing.

Chaplain William H. Black deserves especial praise for the manner in
which he acted being always at his post, and rendering aid and comfort
to the wounded, both while the fight was going on and during the two
succeeding nights. Dr. A. M. Morrison, also deserves great praise for
his kindness and attention to the wounded at all hours, day and night.

My officers, line and staff, acted with great coolness and bravery, with
a few exceptions, which I cannot particularize in this report.

I have the honor to remain, your most obedient servant,

THOMAS H. HAMRICK,
Maj., Cmdg. Regt.

Capt. R. SOUTHGATE,
Acting Assistant Adjutant-Gen., Third Brig. Second Div.

Source: Official Records
CHAP. XXXII.] THE STONE'S RIVER CAMPAIGN. PAGE 569-29
[Series I. Vol. 20. Part I, Reports. Serial No. 29.]

******************************************************************************

Chickamagua after battle report:

Report of Lieut. Col. James C. Foy, Twenty-third Kentucky Infantry.

HDQRS. TWENTY-THIRD REGT. KENTUCKY VOL. INFTY.
Camp near Chattanooga, Tenn., September 27, 1863.
SIR: About 2 a. m. of the 4th instant, Lieut. Livezey, aide-de-camp to
Col. William Grose, commanding our brigade, came to me as we lay in
bivouac near Battle Creek, with orders for me to arouse my men and
proceed to cross the Tennessee River. My instructions were to cross one-half
the regiment at that point and march with the remainder some 1 1/2 miles
below to Battle Creek, where Col. Grose had crossed most of the brigade.
The same orders were repeated to me in a few minutes by Capt. Brooks,
inspector of our brigade. The men were instantly awoke and formed in
marching order. The evening before, I, according to orders received through
Lieut. Boice, aide-de-camp to Col. Grose, had sent three companies to
the river to assist the battery in crossing. The companies on that duty were
Company D, Capt. William Boden; Company E, Capt. John Barnes, and
Company F, First Lieut. J. P. Duke. On arriving at the river I found
that one of these companies had already crossed, and immediately ordered
out
Company H, Capt. Tifft, and Company I, Capt. Black, to cross here, and
placed the whole under the command of Capt. T. J. Williams, who was
assisting me in the capacity of acting major. With the other four companies,
A, B, K, and C, I proceeded down to the designated point, Company G
being detached as guard to the ammunition train.

We soon arrived at the crossing, and reported to Col. Grose, whom I found
superintending the crossing of the brigade in person. We were ordered to get
an old scow loose that had been run on a snag, which was not accomplished
without some difficulty. In the meantime, as soon as any of the small boats
would arrive, I had them filled, and placed the first load in charge of Maj.
G. W. Northup. I remained behind myself to assist the others off until every
man had crossed except the chaplain and a few of the hospital department.

On arriving at the opposite bank a little before sunrise, Capt. William
reported to me that the companies under his charge had all crossed in safety.
I ordered him to remain where he was until I could get word from Col.
Grose. I then marched the four companies that were with me back from the
river into a grove of trees, where we got breakfast about 8.30 a. m. I
received orders, through Capt. G. M. Graves, acting assistant
adjutant-general of Col. Grose's brigade, to collect my men together. I
immediately dispatched Maj. G. W. Northup for the four companies in
charge of Capt. Williams. They joined us about 9.30 a. m. WE lay there
until about 1 p. m., when we, in connection with the other regiments of the
brigade, went into camp close to Shellmound, 7 miles distant from the place
of crossing the river.

September 5.--Left Camp Shellmound about 3.30 p. m. and marched toward
Chattanooga on the road running along the river. Passed the burned bridge
and camped about 8 miles, at 9.30 p. m., in a corn-field, called Camp
Whiteside.

September 6.--Continued our line of march, starting about 7 a. m. Halted
about 12 m. Bivouacked in an orchard on the left of the road. Were now
within 4 miles of Trenton, Ga. The place of our camp was called
Squirreltown Spring. We crossed the Tennessee line into Georgia about 9 a.
m. this day.

September 7.--Remained at this place all this day.

September 8.--Reveille at 2 a. m. We were in motion precisely at 3 a. m.
Marched until 6.30 a. m., when we halted and kept the men under arms all
day. Hawkins' Station about 4 miles distant. That night I received orders
from Col. Grose in person that he intended to start the next morning on a
reconnaissance up the Lookout Mountain; that he would start at 4 a. m. and
wound expect to take my regiment with him in connection with the
Twenty-fourth Ohio and Eighty-fourth Illinois. Accordingly, at 4 a. m. we
fell in line and moved off. On our arrival at the foot of the mountain, distant
from our place of bivouac 2 miles, the Eighty-fourth Illinois was left there
to protect our rear, while the Twenty-fourth Ohio led the advance up to the
summit, followed close by my regiment. The skirmishers of the
Twenty-fourth Ohio drove in the enemy's outposts, wounding 1 man that we
know of. On hearing the enemy's fire I hastened my men up the mountain.
Col. Grose ordered me to take my position on the right of Twenty-fourth
Ohio, and to throw out one company as skirmishers, which I immediately
did. I ordered Capt. Hardiman, commanding Company B, to deploy his
company well to the right, which he did. We now stood in line of battle for
a few moments. No seeing or hearing any more from the enemy, Col. Grose
ordered me to throw up temporary breastworks. This was quickly done.
After lying there about two hours we moved forward along the crest of the
mountain, arriving at Point Lookout about 11.30 a. m. We found no enemy
in force on the mountain, and now from this point could be distinctly seen
the dust from the enemy's column moving out from Chattanooga. The
colonel commanding decided on giving us a little rest for a few hours. WE
started down the mountain between 1 and 2 p. m., leaving Chattanooga to
our left. Went into bivouac near Rossville, distant about 4 miles from
Chattanooga, and in the State of Georgia.

September 10.--Marched from camp on the Ringgold road. The skirmishers
of the First Brigade were driven back by the rebels at------. My regiment
was ordered forward at double-quick. I threw out Company B, Capt.
Hardiman, and Company D, Capt. Boden, as skirmishers here. We
proceeded forward in line of battle with our right resting on the road,
connecting, with the left of the Thirty-first Indiana, in Gen. Cruft's brigade.
WE skirmished all the afternoon, driving the enemy's skirmishers before us.
Returned and bivouacked on the enemy's camp ground 1 1/2 miles west of
Graysville.

September 11.--Left camp about 6.30 a. m. Started on the Ringgold road,
via Graysville. Arrived at Ringgold about 12m. Halted and went into bivouac
close to the town.

September 12.--left camp a little after sunrise by the road to La Fayette. At
10 a. m. halted, distant 5 miles from Ringgold, and formed line of battle,
with our left resting on the road. I sent out the two left companies forward
on the road as outposts. They were stationed by Col. Grose. Heard
skirmishing to our left. We were under arms here all the time until about 4
p. m., when we marched out, bivouacked some 3 miles ahead in a
corn-field, where it was said that Gen. Polk's corps had passed the night
before. This was on the Chickamauga Creek, which was about one-quarter
of a mile from the camp, and immediately opposite Lee and Gordon's Mills
on the east side.

September 13.--We were up and stood in line of battle from 3 a. m. until
daylight, when we proceeded to get breakfast. About 7 a. m. we were
startled by heavy skirmishing in our front. The regiment formed line of
battle instantly, and was ordered by Col. Grose to take position about 200
yards to the rear of the Eighty-fourth Illinois, with our left almost connecting
with the Thirty-sixth Indiana. WE remained in this position and under arms
all day.

September 14.--Received orders from Col. Grose to be ready to march at a
moment's notice. This was about 3.30 a. m. Started in connection with the
brigade about sunrise. Crossed the Chickamauga at Lee and Gordon's Mills,
marched about 10 miles in a southwesterly direction, and bivouacked in
Chattanooga Valley, about 12 miles from Chattanooga.

September 15.--Reveille at 3 a. m. Started at 5 a. m., retracing our way
toward Lee and Gordon's Mills, but turned off the right. Halted about 9.30
a. m. for water at Crawfish Spring. After resting a short time, resumed the
march and halted at 12 m. on the bank of Chickamauga Creek, south of Lee
and Gordon's Mills and 6 miles above.

September 16.--Prospect of staying here. Had the camp well cleaned up
under the supervision of Lieut. J. P. Duke, as officer of the day.

September 17.--There was considerable firing on our pickets last night and
early this morning. The rebel pickets made a heavy dash on Gen. Hazen's
brigade, which was camped on our right. I was immediately on my horse
and had the regiment ready to move. Col. Grose came down, and the firing
not continuing, we were ordered to get our breakfast and be ready to move.
Not hearing anything now of the enemy, I had a hastily constructed
breastwork of logs thrown up on the bank of the stream. This evening moved
camp about 3 miles toward Lee and Gordon's Mills and bivouacked in an
open field.

September 18.--Lay here until 3 p. m. Moved out and relieved the Eight
Kentucky of Gen. Van Cleve's division. WE formed line of battle to the left
of the Sixth Ohio, our right resting close to a farm-house 4 miles from Lee
and Gordon's Mills. According to orders, I sent out company H, Capt. Tifft,
and Company F, First Lieut. J. P. Duke, to relieve two companies of
the Eight Kentucky, who were out as skirmishers. Our skirmishers saw the
rebels plainly and drove their line back, until I had to send word for them
to fall back and act as pickets for the regiment. At 12 o'clock midnight we
were relieved by the Fifteenth Kentucky. After some little delay, the brigade
proceeded toward Lee and Gordon's Mills, where we arrived about daylight
on the morning of the 19th.

September 19.--We had scarcely breakfasted when our brigade was in motion
again, going out the Rossville road. WE numbered for duty 240 enlisted
men, 23 officers; aggregate, 263.

(I should have mentioned above, that on crossing the Tennessee River I had
300 men; [but] through sickness and [those] necessarily with the teams left
behind, the regiment [was reduced] to the above number.)
We proceeded down this road about 3 miles, throwing out Company I, Capt.
Black, and Company C, First Lieut. Hudson, as skirmishers, when we
turned to the right of the road, marching down 700 yards and formed line
of battle on the right of the Thirty-sixth Indiana, and 350 yards to the rear
of the Eighty-fourth Illinois battery being behind the Eighty-fourth Illinois,
and they had proceeded bus a short distance when the battle commenced by
some other troops on our left and front. WE proceeded cautiously along in
the direction of the battle-ground, but just before we reached the conflict I
was ordered to march my regiment by the left flank back to the road we had
come on, the other regiments of the brigade following. Col. Grose has just
received orders from Gen. Palmer, commanding the division, to march his
brigade back. Before we had got quite back we were met by Gen. Palmer
and were turned toward the field of battle again. WE arrived on the
battle-ground a little before 11 a. m. My regiment was posted to the left of
the Twenty-fourth Ohio, about 30 paces, Russell's battery a little to our rear,
the Second Kentucky about 100 yards in advance and to our left. The battle
was now raging warmly. The battery to our rear was pouring a destructive
fire into their ranks, while the Second Kentucky to our left, the
Twenty-fourth Ohio on our right, and the Twenty-third Kentucky poured in
volley after volley. After we had been in this position about one-half to
three-quarters of an hour, I noticed that the enemy were renewing the attack
with redoubled vigor. The Second Kentucky retired step by step and inch by
inch until they arrived on a line with us. At this instant I noticed the
Twenty-fourth Ohio giving slowly back. I immediately
sent an officer to see what was the matter. He brought the word back "all
right" and that they intended to hold their ground. We now fought, I
suppose, for about an hour longer, but right in the midst of the fighting,
finding out that the artillery to our rear was wounding some of the men in
the right companies, I moved the regiment by the left flank until they formed
with the Second Kentucky. The storm of battle now somewhat ceased. We
renewed our ammunition, marched to pass lines to the rear, which was done
in good order, the Eighty-fourth Illinois relieving us. We had scarcely fallen
back when the enemy redoubled their attack with great fury.

It was now plain that they were moving men to our right. We immediately
changed front toward our right with the left company resting where the right
had been. This threw the Twenty-fourth Ohio in our front about 100 yards.
We were ordered to lie down. The attack was now made on the
Twenty-fourth Ohio, this time still stronger than before, and here allow me
to bear testimony to the bravery of that little regiment. I do not think any
regiment that day was under a more galling fire than they were; yet they
stood as if every man was a hero for the space of half an hour; then they fell
back step by step until they were in the rear of our regiment. I then ordered
my men to rise up and open fire, which they did with a cheer. The
Twenty-fourth Ohio halted in our rear, and now, side by side and shoulder
to shoulder, did the Twenty-fourth Ohio and Twenty-third Kentucky stand
up and successively repulse the enemy in all his attacks.

The fire now was very hot. It appeared to me as though every third man in
the regiment was struck. I was struck on the right breast, the bullet going
through the lapels of my overcoat, and struck a large button, glancing off,
doing no injury. I kept my eyes watching well the enemy, while the two
regiments were there bravely fighting. I noticed the enemy had worked
round our right, we having no protection there, and were now pouring a
heavy cross-fire into our ranks. One or two of the captains had suggested to
me that we had better retire. I thought we would have to, but hesitated about
giving the command.

Finally, seeing we were outnumbered, as I thought by the length of their line
of battle, at least five to one, I very reluctantly gave the command to retire,
which we did, and took a new position about 300 to 400 yards to the rear,
and close to Cockerill's battery, belonging to Gen. Hazen's brigade. WE
now rested until sundown, marched down into the woods, and bivouacked
for the night. I found my loss to be 1 officer killed, 3 officers wounded, and
42 enlisted men wounded and 9 killed.

Next morning, September 20, we threw up some slight breastworks, but
about 8 a. m. we had to march out an open field, and then formed in double
column on the center, about 350 yards to the rear of Gen. Hazen's brigade.
I had not been in this position more than twenty minutes, when I was
ordered, through Lieut. Livezey, aide-de-camp to Col. Grose, to report
with my regiment to Gen. Hazen. On reporting to the general, he ordered
me to extend the line of the Sixth Kentucky on their right, which placed me
to the rear of the One hundred and twenty-fourth Ohio, about 100 yards,
whom we were to support, they being stationed behind some breastworks
that Gen. Hazen had had the prudence to erect, I suppose, the night before.
The battle now commenced by a terrific
attack on our front and left. We lay flat on the ground, the bullets flying
over us in all directions. The regiment at the breastworks did well, and
successfully repulsed the enemy.

After about three-quarters of an hour we were ordered up to the works. I
had 3 men wounded while we were lying down. The men knelt down behind
the breastworks, and volley after volley did we pour into the enemy's ranks,
one regiment always reserving it fire until the other had loaded. The whole
left of our army was turned at one time it the morning, but so well did this
brigade do its duty behind the line of breastworks the general had erected,
that I have no doubt they saved a portion of the army from premature rout.
We remained in this position until about 4 p. m., successfully repulsing
every attack made on us. We were now ordered to change front to the right.
After being in this position half an hour we were ordered back to the
breastworks. The storm of battle had now ceased on our left and front, but
off to the right it was renewed with increased vigor. There was now
considerable changing round of troops. Gen. Hazen, with his entire brigade,
moved off in the direction of the enemy's left to attack them, leaving orders
with me to hold the breastworks at all hazards. We were now joined by the
Seventy-fifth Indiana. At this time there was no firing where we were, only
by the sharpshooters of the enemy. The battle on our right now waxed
warmer and warmer. At times it would seem as if it would recede from us,
and then again it would come up nearly to where we lay. By this time it was
plain that the tide of battle was going against us. The Seventy-fifth Indiana
had been moved away to another part of the field, and our little regiment
was all that was left in the breastworks, where a whole brigade of five
regiments had done battle in the morning.

After receiving my orders from Gen. Hazen, Gen. Palmer rode along and
told us about the same thing, adding that we were no to leave there until he
gave the order. Soon we could see our men, line after line, give way on the
right. At length the whole line to my right appeared to be falling back fast.
The battery that was with us at this instant hitched up and drove off. I
looked toward the left. Gen. Cruft was slowly retiring his brigade.

Maj. G. W. Northup now came up to me with an order from Col. Grose to
follow the battery that had just left. I proceeded to move off by the right
flank by file right. I soon saw there was great danger of being thrown into
confusion in marching by the flank. I then formed into columns of
companies as we marched, and proceeded across the field. I could see no
organized body of troops but our regiment and Gen. Cruft with his brigade,
who were retiring in excellent order on our then right. I approached the
general and asked him what was best to be done. He told me he intended to
halt as soon as he reached the woods, and try and rally some of the broken
regiments that were leaving the field in disorder. I told him then that I would
report to him with my regiment for duty. As soon as we reached the edge
of the woods we halted. The general finding this was too close to the
enemy's fire to rally any of the scattered men, he moved on with his brigade
to the top of a high hill about 1 1/2 miles from the battle-field, where he
halted for the space of one or two hours, collecting the remains of different
regiments together. We now proceeded down hill. At the foot of the hill I
saw Col. Grose, and then joined our brigade and proceeded to the vicinity
of Rossville, near Chattanooga, where we bivouacked for the night.

September 21.--We marched out the Rossville road about 2 1/2 miles,
ascended a point of the mountain to the north of the road. We lay on the
west side of the mountain until about 3 p. m.; were ordered to the top of the
mountain and placed behind some breastworks to the left of the Forty-first
Ohio. Very little firing was done here, except by an occasional sharpshooter.
About midnight we moved down the hill and bivouacked in our present camp
from that time until now. Since then our duty has been varied, such as picket
and outpost duty, standing at arms, resting, and working on the breastworks.

I have forgotten to mention the casualties of the 20th. They were as follows:

One man killed, 3 wounded, which make a total of casualties of 1 officer
killed, 9 enlisted men killed, 3 officers wounded, and 45 enlisted men
wounded and 9 enlisted men missing. There are 10 or 12 others wounded in
the regiment, but their wounds being so slight, they being all able for duty,
I thought it unnecessary to report them. There are only nine companies of
the regiment, the other company being detached as train guard.

And now, in conclusion, allow me to express publicly my warmest thanks
to both men and officers for the promptness and alacrity with which they
obeyed every order; also, for the cool courage with which they faced the
enemy in the battles of the two days.

Where all did well it is hard to particularize. I must thank Capt. Tifft for his
undaunted courage on both days. I also return my thanks for the assistance
rendered me in the management of the regiment by Maj. G. W. Northup,
Capt. T. J. Williams, acting major, and Adjt. W. H. Mundy. I feel grateful
to Capt. Hardiman and Lieut. J. P. Duke for the prompt assistance
rendered me. Lieut. Henry G. Shiner, of Company B, who was
wounded in Saturday's fight, I cannot speak too highly of-his qualities as a
soldier and an officer, ever ready to obey and yield me all the assistance in
his power, whether it was on the march or in the bivouac. I know that the
services of an officer like him can never be repaid, but he has my best
wishes for his speedy recovery. For Lieut. J. C. Hoffman and the brave
men who fell I drop a silent tear.

One word now for the enlisted men. No men could fight better; not only my
own men, but all that came under my observation, and too much credit
cannot be given to the private soldiers for the fortitude, bravery, and
unparalleled heroism displayed by them. I had almost forgotten our worthy
chaplain, Rev. William H. Black, whose place here, as at Stone's River, was
in hospital, and visiting wounded soldiers. I know that many of the wounded,
both in this and the battle of Stone's River, have had cause to bless his
name, as he worked with his own hands to administer to them what relief
was in his power. In the name of the sick and wounded soldiers, I publicly
return him my thanks for favors bestowed on them; also, to Surgeons
Morrison and Hasbrouck, who, in their department, I know labored to
alleviate the suffering of the wounded soldiers consigned to their charge.
Herewith Inclose you a list of the casualties.*

I remain, sir, very respectfully, yours, &c.,

JAS. C. FOY,
Lieut.-Col., Comdg. 23d Regt. Kentucky Vols.

Col. W. GROSE, Comdg. Third Brigade.

Source: Official Records
PAGE 789-50 KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., N. ALA., AND N. GA. [CHAP. XLII.
[Series I. Vol. 30. Part I, Reports. Serial No. 50.]

**********************************************************************************
Wow, you do not mess around, I appreciate all your help though.
 

lelliott19

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Thanks for your help, but I don’t think that is him. He was born in 1833. But I just find it odd that he didn’t serve and his brothers did.
So Thomas was the oldest of the three? He would have been 28 years old. Where was he born? Sometimes men enlisted in companies from the place where they were born instead of where they lived at the time. Do you know his occupation at the time?

Ohio is just across the river from Lewis County Kentucky. It is possible that Thomas enlisted in an Ohio regiment. There is a "Thomas Ash" who served in Company G 18th Ohio but there are only index cards for Ohio. Unfortunately, there's no information about what counties the men in Company G were from. It looks like a number of the men in company A were from Highland County Ohio - which is across the river and within 100 miles of Lewis County KY.
 
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Kyle Kalasnik

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Joined
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Messages
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Location
Potter County, PA
So Thomas was the oldest of the three? He would have been 28 years old. Where was he born? Sometimes men enlisted in companies from the place where they were born instead of where they lived at the time. Do you know his occupation at the time?

Ohio is just across the river from Lewis County Kentucky. It is possible that Thomas enlisted in an Ohio regiment. There is a "Thomas Ash" who served in Company G 18th Ohio but there are only index cards for Ohio. Unfortunately, there's no information about what counties the men in Company G were from. It looks like a number of the men in company A were from Highland County Ohio - which is across the river and within 100 miles of Lewis County KY.
He was born in Virginia. And I dont think it was in an area where West Virginia was part of Virginia at the time. I couldn’t tell you for certain what his occupation was. From an census in 1880 (?) it said farmer. Of course all this information that I am finding is off find a grave, and “free” genealogy site, and we all know how incorrect those could be.

Yes it is very possible he served in an Ohio or WV unit, being that close to the state lines. I know where I live (Potter County, PA) many men crossed into the southern tier of NY and enlisted in Ney York Regiments. And I’m sure this happened in many parts of the country.
 

Taylin

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Rolling hills of southern Indiana
As of August 1863 it appears he hadn't been in the military (based off the couple of "Thomas Ash" I found on Ancestry.) His wife "Josephine" doesn't appear to have filed for a pension after he died either.
 

Kyle Kalasnik

Private
Joined
Aug 3, 2014
Messages
78
Location
Potter County, PA
Taylin,
Sorry for the late response. “Josephine” was his wife and my 3rd great grandmother. So I guess that answers my question. Thanks for your help, I appreciate it.

Respectfully,
Kyle Kalasnik
 
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