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  1. lelliott19

    Civil War Surgeons - Underrated?

    I'm going out on a limb here and making a claim that, given what they had to work with, Civil War Surgeons are probably vastly underrated. I'm not talking about hospital systems, ambulance corps, post-operative care, transportation systems, and supply logistics. Nor am I talking about those guys...
  2. Eleanor Rose

    Let’s Call the Whole Thing Off!

    "The Proposal" by Knut Ekwall (1880s) A broken engagement was no small matter in the Victorian era. However, if an engaged couple discovered that they were incompatible, 19th century etiquette manuals strongly encouraged ending the engagement rather than entering into a miserable marriage. In...
  3. SWMODave

    I had no desire to go to Gettysburg this summer, I preferred to shed my tears at home.

    Pennsylvania Lt Governor John Peter Shindel Gobin former Brevet General Union Army Civil War Nurse Georgeanna "Georgia" Wade McClellan sister of Gettysburg civilian victim 'Jennie' Wade While stories of reconciliation give us hope and warm our hearts, the reality of war is not everyone can...
  4. Eleanor Rose

    Authentic Green Tomato Chocolate Cake

    (Pinterest) Numerous historical references tell us that Americans consumed chocolate as a beverage until the 1830s or 40s. What Victorians would have considered as "chocolate cake" was simply a white or yellow cake intended to be eaten with a chocolate beverage. Ladies began adding chocolate...
  5. Eleanor Rose

    History Peanut Butter Brittle

    The Davenport Hotel opened in Spokane, Washington in 1914 as a “place where guests could experience a singular combination of world-class service, palatial splendor, and inviting warmth.” While famous for its world class accommodations, the hotel also became world famous for its soft peanut...
  6. Eleanor Rose

    Did Southern Belles Marry the Enemy?: It was an “Awful Possibility”

    The Reluctant Bride (1866) by Auguste Toulmouche. In 1864, the editor of the Southern Literary Messenger received a letter from H. R., who identified herself as an eighteen-year-old, unmarried woman from Buckingham County, Virginia. Hattie, as the editor called the anonymous letter writer...
  7. luinrina

    Recruiting colored troops - William Birney

    Men of Color – To Arms! To Arms! – Now or Never! From American Battlefield Trust William McDowell Birney was born on May 28, 1819 in Madison City, Alabama. He was the second son and child of abolitionist James Gillespie Birney and his wife Agatha McDowell Birney. He was the older brother of...
  8. Jimklag

    January 23 In Civil War History

    On this day in Civil War history Compiled by Mitchell Werksman and Jim Klag January 23, 1833 - John Randolph Chambliss Jr, American Brigadier-General (Confederate Army), born in Greensville County, Virginia (d. 1864) January 23, 1853 - John Wilkes Booth is baptized at St. Timothy's Protestant...
  9. SWMODave

    That yard was cleaned out in less time than I can tell

    Photo not related to story We had received while at Chewalla an order from General Dodge to go out to the residence of a noted guerilla, and recover a barrel of sugar and a sack of coffee, that in some mysterious way had been slipped through the lines at Corinth. Finding no one at home but the...
  10. AUG

    The Camden Knights, Co. C, 1st Arkansas Infantry

    http://museumcatalog.virginiahistory.org/final/Portal/Default.aspx?component=AADB&record=9a0c10ad-ce4c-41f1-ab5f-3ea66b3db26e Quarter-plate ambrotype of Private Christopher C. Scott and Private Christopher Thrower in the early war uniform of the Camden Knights, organized as Company C of the 1st...
  11. Eleanor Rose

    The Gettysburg Quarry in Vermont!

    The Gettysburg Quarry in Dorset, VT during its heyday. (Facebook-Town of Dorset, VT) I’ve never visited Vermont, but I know it is well known for its long marble quarrying history. The town of Dorset is home to Dorset Quarry, the oldest marble quarry in the nation. What I didn’t know is that...
  12. USS ALASKA

    US Civil War Era Training Prison Barrack Receiving Accommodation hulks

    USS Minnesota housed over as a training hulk, possibly while assigned to the Massachusetts Naval Militia in 1895-1901. US Naval History and Heritage Command, Photo # NH 106687, donation of Charles R. Haberlein Jr., 2009. http://www.navsource.org/archives/09/86/098637609.jpg I thought so too...
  13. Eleanor Rose

    Recreated “Granula”: 19th Century Granola

    In 1863, Dr. James C. Jackson of New York developed what he called "Granula," a Graham flour mixture that was formed into sheets, baked until dry, broken up, baked again and broken up into even smaller pieces. In 1898, Charles W. Post used Dr. Jackson's basic recipe for “Granula” to develop...
  14. lelliott19

    Original Document Discovery: Get Your Mules & Ambulances Ready - CS Medical Circular Tullahoma, Tenn. March 15, 1863

    While going through a large box of genealogy research paperwork today, we finally "dug" some original relics!!! :dance: The genealogy paperwork belonged to my grandfather (d. 1972) and the original documents include many related to my 2x great grandfather who was a CS Surgeon. @ucvrelics its...
  15. USS ALASKA

    Mine (torpedo) sweeping on the James by USS Spuyten Duyvil

    http://www.naval-history.net/PhotoZHinds.htm Reading about the USS Spuyten Duyvil at http://web.archive.org/web/20140407072941/http://www.history.navy.mil/danfs/s16/spuyten_duyvil.htm I came across this quote... "After Lee evacuated Richmond, Spuyten Duyvil used her torpedoes to help clear the...
  16. USS ALASKA

    Railroad spike ceremony set Jan. 25

    https://www.up.com/goldenspike/index.html To go with all the recent Transcontinental Railroad threads... Railroad spike ceremony set Jan. 25 21 hrs ago ELKO – Union Pacific Railroad will be concluding its 150th celebration of completing the Transcontinental Railroad this spring, and a special...
  17. Eleanor Rose

    19th Century Lorgnettes Raised a Few Eyebrows

    Lorgnette of Gold and Glass, mid-19th century. (Courtesy of The Smithsonian Design Museum.) A lorgnette is a pair of spectacles mounted on a handle. Lorgnettes were a common sight during the 19th century at the theater and the opera. The name lorgnette derives from the French word lorgner –...
  18. luinrina

    The Last Ditch – or: The Adoption of a New Rebel Uniform

    Latest news! - "Cowardly behavior of the Head of Southern Chivalry." - "Jeff. Davis' Disguise." - "Capture in a woman's dress." On May 10, 1865 the 4th Michigan Cavalry landed the big coup – they caught the Confederate president Jefferson Davis at Irwinville, Georgia. Their reward? $100,000 in...
  19. USS ALASKA

    'Practice of Search'

    http://www.navsource.org/archives/09/86/098605307.jpg I was reading about the USS Colorado in DANFS - http://www.hazegray.org/danfs/frigates/colorado.htm. During her antebellum career, she "...cruised in Cuban waters deterring the practice of search by British cruisers...". (Bold italic...
  20. luinrina

    His father's aide - George Gordon Meade, Jr.

    George Gordon Meade, Jr. was born on November 2, 1843 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, as second child and son of (future General) George Gordon Meade and his wife Margaretta Sergeant Meade. Following his father's footsteps, George entered West Point in 1860 but left again after only two years on...
  21. SWMODave

    ... the Colonel's horse maneuvered disagreeably close to its edge.

    In spite of the seriousness of the battlefield some amusing things will occur. Frequently an officer’s horse will give him trouble, and raise a laugh at his expense. During the battle of the 16th, Col. George Lay, formerly of the old army, and on the staff of Gen. Scott, was serving on the staff...
  22. lelliott19

    North and South United in their Sympathy by the Death of Grant

    In this 1885 drawing by George Yost Coffin, pall bearers General William T. Sherman and General Phillip H. Sheridan and former Confederate Generals Joseph E. Johnston and Simon B. Buckner carry the casket of Ulysses S. Grant. President Grover Cleveland and General Winfield Scott Hancock look on...
  23. lelliott19

    Cannoneer of the 4th US Artillery meets President Lincoln: "A Very Long Record for Such a Short Boy"

    "Of course there was nothing remarkable in this interview, but it was one of the chief events of my life...." Recalling his experiences in Battery B, 4th US Artillery, the author recalls traveling with a squad of 40 detached artillerymen to transport captured Confederate cannon from the Battle...
  24. lelliott19

    Act of Kindness: Cannoneer of 4th US Artillery Provides Medical Aid to Wounded Enemy at Cedar Creek

    "At the time such little courtesies were a matter of course. It was only in actual battle that the veterans of the two armies were really enemies." Writing about the Battle of Cedar Creek, October 19, 1864, a cannoneer of Battery B, 4th US Artillery recalls providing medical aid to a wounded...
  25. Eleanor Rose

    "Twenty-five Cent Dinners for Families of Six" by Juliet Corson

    Juliet Corson Yes. You read that right! In 1878, Juliet Corson put together this book on economic housekeeping. Obviously it has become quite impossible to feed anyone on twenty-five cents, but many of her principles on how to cook economically have not changed very much. We can still enjoy...
  26. AUG

    The Battle of Jenkins' Ferry by Silas C. Turnbo

    (Random illustration from Battles & Leaders. Not Jenkins' Ferry but I thought it would go well with the article.) The following is Silas Claiborne "Claib" Turnbo's account of the battle of Jenkins' Ferry, Ark., April 30, 1864. At 18 years old, Turnbo enlisted as a private in Co. A, 27th...
  27. Eleanor Rose

    This Might Be the Most Intriguing Antique I've Found

    Silver morning glory decorated aide memoire from the 19th century. My sweet friends, @luinrina, @Zella, @FarawayFriend and @NH Civil War Gal got me thinking about Victorian notepads when they posted in a thread I started on Victorian chatelaines. In an age when the dip-pen ruled supreme...
  28. Eleanor Rose

    "The American Woman's Home"

    "The American Woman's Home" is the most complete record of historic (mid-1800s) American domestic life I've discovered. It offers a unique look at women's lives during the 19th century. Published in 1869 by none other than the Beecher sisters, Harriet and Catharine, it discusses built-in...
  29. Eleanor Rose

    Chatelaines: A Victorian Fashion Statement

    Chatelaine (USA), ca. 1860; silver, gold wash, ivory, enamel, glass. Cooper Hewitt/Smithsonian Institution. The chatelaine’s popularity as an accessory in the 1860s appears to have been due to a growing Victorian belief in the importance of rational housekeeping in a woman’s life. While...
  30. luinrina

    Colonel at 19 - Henry K. Burgwyn

    Henry "Harry" King Burgwyn, Jr. was born on October 3, 1841 at his mother's ancestral home just outside Boston, Massachusetts. He was the second child and oldest son of Henry King Burgwyn (Sr.) and Ann Greenough Burgwyn. He grew up on the Burgwyn plantation "Thornbury" in Northampton County...
  31. lelliott19

    Civil War Drawings in Old Newspapers

    When I am scanning old newspaper articles, I frequently marvel at the talent of the artists who sketched for the newspapers back in the day. Imagine someone taking the time to sketch a scene to go along with a story. Some articles include multiple sketches. How may sketches would there have been...
  32. SWMODave

    I slept easy of nights after that

    The Thomas O'Sullivan in Missouri Captain James G. McIntosh … “In the fall of 1861 I was given command of the ‘Chickasaw,’ as engineer. The ‘Chickasaw’ was one of the best machines on the road. The ‘General Lyon’ was another good engine which later on made a war record. Engines were all named...
  33. lelliott19

    Accurate Description of English Cartridges? "made of stout writing paper and the finest of powder"

    "...I found cartridges made of stout writing paper and the finest of powder; they were stronger in material and force than ours. A rebel told me afterward they were of English make. I thought they made my gun kick harder." Sometimes reminiscences of old veterans can provide information about...
  34. Eleanor Rose

    Authentic Potlikker

    (Sights, Sounds, and Tastes of the American South) Potlikker is the liquid left behind after boiling collards and it’s loaded with vitamins and minerals. Don’t make the mistake of calling it a broth. It’s really more like a soup - one that develops as collards simmer. And yes, it is spelled...
  35. Eleanor Rose

    Authentic Southern Sweet Potato Cake

    (Pinterest) January 8 is my favorite General’s birthday so this recipe is in his honor. General Longstreet loved sweet potatoes so I think he would have liked this cake. It has just the right amount of spice to compliment the sweet potato. And yes, there is real sweet potato in this cake...
  36. Eleanor Rose

    The Birth of "Southern Hospitality"

    It seems the phrase “Southern hospitality” wasn’t used until the 1820s or 1830s, when national debates about slavery intensified. For many, the idea of “Southern hospitality” became a way of defending the Southern lifestyle and a political system that depended on slavery. Even today, “Southern...
  37. Eleanor Rose

    This Historic Church is Worth a Visit!

    The feeling of peace and tranquility that one experiences upon entering this church is indescribable. It is truly a respite from the busy streets of New Orleans. The Immaculate Conception church, locally known as Jesuit church, is a Roman Catholic church in the Central Business District of New...
  38. Eleanor Rose

    Period Chocolate Covered Drunken Cherries

    (Pinterest) I’ve been a fan of chocolate covered cherries since I was a child, but as an adult I’ve found it is fun to kick them up a notch by spiking them with delicious liquors. There are plenty of confectioners that make cherry cordials, but the three most popular are Cella’s, Queen Anne’s...
  39. Pat Young

    Happy Emancipation Day from the Reconstruction Forum!

    When the Emancipation Proclamation was signed by President Lincoln on January 1, 1863, Black communities around the United States were already celebrating before the official word arrived via telegraph. Many cities held "watch parties" beginning the night before to await the signing. This...
  40. Eleanor Rose

    Did You Hear the Footsteps at Midnight?

    “First-Footing” was critical to New Year’s Eve in the Victorian Era. “First Footing” literally means the first foot to cross your threshold after midnight. This visitor was expected to bring a gift of bread, salt, coal, whisky, food or greenery to ensure a prosperous and healthy year ahead. I...


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