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  1. Eleanor Rose

    Authentic Sherry Cobbler

    Sherry became affordable for Americans in the Mid-19th century. They relied on imported sherry as well as its fortified cousin, Madeira. In the 1840s, the sherry cobbler became very popular. Our Victorian friends loved the “exotic” ingredients and ice was still a novelty. While ice wasn’t new...
  2. lelliott19

    Fraser's Battery at Cold Harbor: Gallant Falligant & Alex Campbell's Ultimate Act of Kindness

    "Years later, Grant said—looking back over his long career of bloody fights—that Cold Harbor was the only battle he ever fought that he would not fight over again under the same circumstances." In Chapter XX, Four Years Under Marse Robert, Major Robert Stiles describes a significant, but...
  3. JPK Huson 1863

    Rosie The Riveter's Grandmother, The Tough Kept Going

    It may not have taken much effort watching that ' home washer ' being put to use, perhaps the point of this advertisement. Like it was easy. Most of our ancestors were the girls using those things. That's a load of sodden laundry next to it and ever hang a wet sheet on the clothes line? It's a...
  4. DBF

    “He Was Our Father, We His Boys”

    “And there grand old Chaplain Brown, now swift from the caissons springing, Rushes with rations of cartridge, feeding the patriots' guns; Now by the wounded and dying kneels down where the bullets are singing, Faithful to fight for his country or pray for the souls of her sons.” Extract...
  5. USS ALASKA

    American Railroad Mergers and Family History Charts

    https://www.railroadsignals.us/mergers/ For those interested in Ancestry and Family Trees, some excellent charts on the above web page of Railroad background. Cheers, USS ALASKA
  6. USS ALASKA

    CSS Georgia Casement Cross Section

    http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Ubn8APELYCY/Uo4scJGTWVI/AAAAAAAADW4/0_H1-SY2ifc/s1600/Casemate+Cross+Section.jpg Stumbled across this on @Phil Gast site http://civil-war-picket.blogspot.com/2013/11/mysteries-of-deep-upcoming-raising-of.html Is this an accurate depiction? Also, does anyone know the...
  7. lelliott19

    Act of Kindness: Sword of Capt. John S McDowell 77th Pennsylvania

    "Had a thunderbolt fallen from the clear blue sky, the Captain could not have been more astonished." The sword belonging to Capt. John Sands McDowell (F/77PA), which had been captured at Chickamauga in September 1863, was returned to him 37 years later, by a man who was not even born at the time...
  8. JPK Huson 1863

    The Fan ' Language ' Of An Over-Heated Era

    From NYPL, one of the era patterns you could use to create an elegant lady's fan. There are quite a few of these and such an outdated concept I once assumed the darn things were lampshades. Duh. Fan. Wrong can be a hobby if you're good enough at it. Also NYPL, undated but seems pre-war, maybe...
  9. Eleanor Rose

    The Moral Dangers of Reading Novels in 1864

    "Young Woman Reading" by Alfred Stevens, 1856. Do you enjoy reading a novel every now and then? Perhaps one set in the 19th century that represents people and events with some degree of realism. If so, beware! In 1864 the warnings below were published in a New York religious tract entitled...
  10. USS ALASKA

    Book Review The U.S. Navy and the Origins of the Military-Industrial Complex, 1847-1883 by Dr. Kurt Hackemer

    Author(s) or editor(s) first and last name(s) / Dr. Kurt Hackemer Title of book / The U.S. Navy and the Origins of the Military-Industrial Complex, 1847-1883 Year of publication / Copyright 2001 Place of publication / Annapolis, MD Publisher / Naval Institute Press Number of pages / 181 Price /...
  11. SWMODave

    I have never witnessed more sublime faithfulness unto death ....

    At the crisis of the battle we were stationed in Fort Magruder, as above explained, the key of our position. I was standing, sponge-staff in hand, awaiting the firing of my gun, the next piece to the left being a gun of the Fayette Artillery. As my eye fell upon it No. I was sponging out, No. 3...
  12. luinrina

    Composure in Crisis - Joseph Jackson Bartlett

    VI Corps assault at Crampton's Gap, Harpers Weekly From southmountaincw.wordpress.com Joseph Jackson Bartlett was born on November 21, 1834 in Binghamton, New York. His father, Joseph Bartlett, and uncle, Robert Bartlett, were gunmakers; they produced rifles for many years but went out of...
  13. lelliott19

    Substandard Shoes at Gettysburg? Peter Wellington Alexander Reports 10,000 Barefooted Confederates on the Retreat

    In this letter, dated Culpeper Court House, August 2, 1863, Peter Wellington Alexander reports on a significant shoe situation. No, not the one you're thinking of. :D Apparently, prior to the Gettysburg campaign, a large number of substandard shoes were issued to the Army of Northern Virginia...
  14. SWMODave

    They called and begged for water, called for someone to come and kill them, and then end their misery

    In 2016, member chubachus posted this photo on cwt in period photo's here. The soldier in the middle is Corporal Jacob Heffelfinger ... and therein lies a soldiers story that needs to be told. (note - this is long and I realize many members do not like to read long posts. I edited this as much...
  15. lelliott19

    Jefferson Davis: Once Celebrated, Later Imprisoned - at Fort Monroe

    In 1855, Jefferson Davis' visit to Fort Monroe was celebrated with fireworks and fan-fair. Ten years later he arrived as a prisoner, aboard the steamer William P. Clyde. The 1855 "fireworks and fan-fair" visit occurred while Davis was serving as US Secretary of War in the cabinet of President...
  16. lelliott19

    Re-dedication of Headstones at Yorktown National Cemetery: Four Soldiers Unknown No Longer

    Suffolk resident and senior vice commander of the local Sons of Union Veterans camp, Thomas Grund, Jr., spent months working to identify four soldiers who, for decades, had lain under tombstones marked "Unknown". The park service reviewed the claims and agreed that Grund's conclusions were...
  17. lelliott19

    Longstreet's Missed Opportunity at Chickamauga? Dave Powell weighs in on 900-yard gap in the Federal line between Snodgrass Hill and Kelly Field

    Dave Powell has been doing a regular feature called "Fridays with Dave Powell." The series originated on a Chickamauga group page on Facebook. I had missed the series until I ran across this one, from May 10, 2019, re-posted on Dave's blog. It details the activities of four of my favorites -...
  18. Pat Young

    The Woman Who Published "The Reconstructionist": Firebrand and Arson

    I am reading the new book The Impeachers and I can across a newspaper that I never heard of before, The Reconstructionist. Here is what author Brenda Wineapple says about the woman who ran the paper: Jane Grey Swisshelm was sacked from the quartermaster’s office mainly because, since 1865...
  19. Eleanor Rose

    Kentucky Remembers Abraham Lincoln

    Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historical Park On our recent exploration of the Bluegrass State, @Southern Unionist and I particularly enjoyed passing through Hodgenville, KY and viewing their many tributes to President Lincoln. This place is definitely worth a visit for anyone who...
  20. lelliott19

    No Time Now to Talk of Fatigue: Doles' Georgia Brigade at Gettysburg

    In his official report of the Battle of Gettysburg, Brigadier General George Pierce Doles credits his July 1, 1863 success to his subordinates, listing them by name. It seems that Doles himself deserves some of that credit. On that day, Doles' brigade, comprised of the 4th, 44th, 12th, and 21st...


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