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  1. luinrina

    His father's aide - George Gordon Meade, Jr.

    George Gordon Meade, Jr. was born on November 2, 1843 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, as second child and son of (future General) George Gordon Meade and his wife Margaretta Sergeant Meade. Following his father's footsteps, George entered West Point in 1860 but left again after only two years on...
  2. SWMODave

    ... the Colonel's horse maneuvered disagreeably close to its edge.

    In spite of the seriousness of the battlefield some amusing things will occur. Frequently an officer’s horse will give him trouble, and raise a laugh at his expense. During the battle of the 16th, Col. George Lay, formerly of the old army, and on the staff of Gen. Scott, was serving on the staff...
  3. lelliott19

    North and South United in their Sympathy by the Death of Grant

    In this 1885 drawing by George Yost Coffin, pall bearers General William T. Sherman and General Phillip H. Sheridan and former Confederate Generals Joseph E. Johnston and Simon B. Buckner carry the casket of Ulysses S. Grant. President Grover Cleveland and General Winfield Scott Hancock look on...
  4. lelliott19

    Cannoneer of the 4th US Artillery meets President Lincoln: "A Very Long Record for Such a Short Boy"

    "Of course there was nothing remarkable in this interview, but it was one of the chief events of my life...." Recalling his experiences in Battery B, 4th US Artillery, the author recalls traveling with a squad of 40 detached artillerymen to transport captured Confederate cannon from the Battle...
  5. lelliott19

    Act of Kindness: Cannoneer of 4th US Artillery Provides Medical Aid to Wounded Enemy at Cedar Creek

    "At the time such little courtesies were a matter of course. It was only in actual battle that the veterans of the two armies were really enemies." Writing about the Battle of Cedar Creek, October 19, 1864, a cannoneer of Battery B, 4th US Artillery recalls providing medical aid to a wounded...
  6. Eleanor Rose

    "Twenty-five Cent Dinners for Families of Six" by Juliet Corson

    Juliet Corson Yes. You read that right! In 1878, Juliet Corson put together this book on economic housekeeping. Obviously it has become quite impossible to feed anyone on twenty-five cents, but many of her principles on how to cook economically have not changed very much. We can still enjoy...
  7. AUG

    The Battle of Jenkins' Ferry by Silas C. Turnbo

    (Random illustration from Battles & Leaders. Not Jenkins' Ferry but I thought it would go well with the article.) The following is Silas Claiborne "Claib" Turnbo's account of the battle of Jenkins' Ferry, Ark., April 30, 1864. At 18 years old, Turnbo enlisted as a private in Co. A, 27th...
  8. Eleanor Rose

    This Might Be the Most Intriguing Antique I've Found

    Silver morning glory decorated aide memoire from the 19th century. My sweet friends, @luinrina, @Zella, @FarawayFriend and @NH Civil War Gal got me thinking about Victorian notepads when they posted in a thread I started on Victorian chatelaines. In an age when the dip-pen ruled supreme...
  9. Eleanor Rose

    "The American Woman's Home"

    "The American Woman's Home" is the most complete record of historic (mid-1800s) American domestic life I've discovered. It offers a unique look at women's lives during the 19th century. Published in 1869 by none other than the Beecher sisters, Harriet and Catharine, it discusses built-in...
  10. Eleanor Rose

    Chatelaines: A Victorian Fashion Statement

    Chatelaine (USA), ca. 1860; silver, gold wash, ivory, enamel, glass. Cooper Hewitt/Smithsonian Institution. The chatelaine’s popularity as an accessory in the 1860s appears to have been due to a growing Victorian belief in the importance of rational housekeeping in a woman’s life. While...
  11. luinrina

    Colonel at 19 - Henry K. Burgwyn

    Henry "Harry" King Burgwyn, Jr. was born on October 3, 1841 at his mother's ancestral home just outside Boston, Massachusetts. He was the second child and oldest son of Henry King Burgwyn (Sr.) and Ann Greenough Burgwyn. He grew up on the Burgwyn plantation "Thornbury" in Northampton County...
  12. lelliott19

    Civil War Drawings in Old Newspapers

    When I am scanning old newspaper articles, I frequently marvel at the talent of the artists who sketched for the newspapers back in the day. Imagine someone taking the time to sketch a scene to go along with a story. Some articles include multiple sketches. How may sketches would there have been...
  13. SWMODave

    I slept easy of nights after that

    The Thomas O'Sullivan in Missouri Captain James G. McIntosh … “In the fall of 1861 I was given command of the ‘Chickasaw,’ as engineer. The ‘Chickasaw’ was one of the best machines on the road. The ‘General Lyon’ was another good engine which later on made a war record. Engines were all named...
  14. lelliott19

    Accurate Description of English Cartridges? "made of stout writing paper and the finest of powder"

    "...I found cartridges made of stout writing paper and the finest of powder; they were stronger in material and force than ours. A rebel told me afterward they were of English make. I thought they made my gun kick harder." Sometimes reminiscences of old veterans can provide information about...
  15. Eleanor Rose

    Authentic Potlikker

    (Sights, Sounds, and Tastes of the American South) Potlikker is the liquid left behind after boiling collards and it’s loaded with vitamins and minerals. Don’t make the mistake of calling it a broth. It’s really more like a soup - one that develops as collards simmer. And yes, it is spelled...
  16. Eleanor Rose

    Authentic Southern Sweet Potato Cake

    (Pinterest) January 8 is my favorite General’s birthday so this recipe is in his honor. General Longstreet loved sweet potatoes so I think he would have liked this cake. It has just the right amount of spice to compliment the sweet potato. And yes, there is real sweet potato in this cake...
  17. Eleanor Rose

    The Birth of "Southern Hospitality"

    It seems the phrase “Southern hospitality” wasn’t used until the 1820s or 1830s, when national debates about slavery intensified. For many, the idea of “Southern hospitality” became a way of defending the Southern lifestyle and a political system that depended on slavery. Even today, “Southern...
  18. Eleanor Rose

    This Historic Church is Worth a Visit!

    The feeling of peace and tranquility that one experiences upon entering this church is indescribable. It is truly a respite from the busy streets of New Orleans. The Immaculate Conception church, locally known as Jesuit church, is a Roman Catholic church in the Central Business District of New...
  19. Eleanor Rose

    Period Chocolate Covered Drunken Cherries

    (Pinterest) I’ve been a fan of chocolate covered cherries since I was a child, but as an adult I’ve found it is fun to kick them up a notch by spiking them with delicious liquors. There are plenty of confectioners that make cherry cordials, but the three most popular are Cella’s, Queen Anne’s...
  20. Pat Young

    Happy Emancipation Day from the Reconstruction Forum!

    When the Emancipation Proclamation was signed by President Lincoln on January 1, 1863, Black communities around the United States were already celebrating before the official word arrived via telegraph. Many cities held "watch parties" beginning the night before to await the signing. This...
  21. Eleanor Rose

    Did You Hear the Footsteps at Midnight?

    “First-Footing” was critical to New Year’s Eve in the Victorian Era. “First Footing” literally means the first foot to cross your threshold after midnight. This visitor was expected to bring a gift of bread, salt, coal, whisky, food or greenery to ensure a prosperous and healthy year ahead. I...
  22. Stiles/Akin

    Joseph E Johnston No General

    Not sure id this was written in jest or they were upset with him handling his own baggage.
  23. Eleanor Rose

    State of Virginia v. Longstreet

    Wood engraving of the Virginia Military Institute from the 1863 Register of the Officers and Cadets of the Virginia Military Institute. A lot of folks don't realize how much financial trouble General Longstreet suffered after the Civil War ended. He was unable to pay his son Garland's tuition...
  24. lelliott19

    45th Georgia at Gettysburg Day 3: Bliss Barn, a well in an apple orchard, & Tom Brown's last run

    "His wrath was up and, undaunted by fear, he bravely announced his intention of making another run for the boys. This time taking but six canteens, he went across the intervening space in a run and disappeared from the Forty-fifth Georgia regiment forever. That was Tom Brown's last run. He gave...
  25. Eleanor Rose

    Authentic Marlborough Pie

    Marlborough Pie was enormously popular until the late 19th century. Writing in 1893 in his book "A New England Boyhood," author Edward Everett Hale says, "... there was always a great deal of talk about the Marlborough pies or the Marlborough pudding. To this hour, in any old and...
  26. Eleanor Rose

    Authentic New Year's Cookies

    We can thank our colonial era Dutch settlers for introducing New Year's Cookies to America. Sometimes called New Year's Cakes, these thin crisp sugar cookies were traditionally flavored with caraway, lemon and sometimes cider. Recipes for New Year's Cookies were very popular in the 1840s...
  27. Eleanor Rose

    19th Century Tradition Still Burning Bright!

    The Great River Road between New Orleans and Baton Rouge, LA is home to a unique holiday lighting display – the Christmas Bonfires. Dozens of 20-feet-high flaming pyramids of burning logs are built along the earthen levees each December and set ablaze on Christmas Eve. The Christmas Bonfires...
  28. USS ALASKA

    Value of Manufactures 1860

    Zoomable PDF can be found here - https://etc.usf.edu/maps/pages/2800/2869/2869.pdf Description: A map of the United States showing the value of manufactures (in millions) and distribution of staple agricultural products in 1860. The map illustrates the disparity between the manufacturing–based...
  29. O' Be Joyful

    Silent Night: How a Beloved Christmas Carol Was Born of War

    Franz Xaver Gruber, Autograph VII, 1860 (© Salzburg Museum / Museum Association On Christmas Eve in 1818, two men with a small guitar entered a church in Oberndorf, Austria, and prepared to sing a new Christmas carol. Times had been bad in Oberndorf, where many people worked on the water...
  30. lelliott19

    Christmas Truce at Fredericksburg & Happy Holidays from the Medical Care Forum

    Happiest of holidays to everyone at Civil War Talk, from the Medical Care Forum! "...Night came on, and those not on duty, lay down on the frozen ground to dream of other Christmas nights, when we knew not of war." It was Christmas day [1862] and after partaking of a Christmas dinner of salt...
  31. Pat Young

    Holiday Greetings to All from the Reconstruction Forum

    Merry Christmas and Kwanzaa Blessings to Everyone
  32. Pat Young

    Remembering the Fredericksburg Dead of the Irish Brigade in Queens, N.Y. Dec. 15. 2018 Photo Tour

    The Battle of Fredericksburg took place 156 years ago this week. Today, in Calvary Cemetery in Queens the New York National Guard held its annual memorial service for the men of the Irish Brigade who gave their lives at Fredericksburg. Over several posts, I will upload photos of the event.
  33. donna

    Authentic Meat Cakes

    We loved our meat dishes! Talk about making a silk purse out of a...., never mind. Era recipes rely heavily on using every scrap, ear and leftover. These are delicious cakes to serve for breakfast or with tea, yet another recipe without the measurements we insist on in 2018. Our ancestors could...
  34. JPK Huson 1863

    You're A Mean One, Mr. Grinch. The Confederacy's Worst Christmas Ever, 1864

    An 1863 image in Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper depicts a family celebrating Christmas. Be sure, not a Southern family and not 1864. The Grinch Act was in place, not a toy in sight that year. So this is confusing. Just made up the term " The Grinch Act ", first thing that came to mind...
  35. Eleanor Rose

    History Cooking With Kudzu

    Kudzu growing in the wild. Well now I’ve heard everything! Folks are cooking with kudzu. Yes, that’s right. They’re cooking with the weeds covering old buildings and hills and growing all over the side of the road. Apparently if you choose to cook with Kudzu, you should choose only the...
  36. Eleanor Rose

    General Lee Did Say It Wasn’t General Longstreet’s Fault!

    The following is an excerpt from “Longstreet's Courier—Memorable Words of Confederate Leaders--A Time when they were Sorely Tried--What Might Have Been--The Part Played by Hood” by William Youngblood, of Alabama: For many years I have thought of writing out for the public what I know of the...
  37. USS ALASKA

    The Long Blue Line: Lighthouse Service during the Civil War

    U.S. Lighthouse Service tender Van Santvoort was transferred to the Union Navy in 1861 and served as the gunboat USS Coeur de Lion during the Civil War. U.S. Coast Guard Collection. The Long Blue Line: Lighthouse Service during the Civil War Posted by Diana Sherbs, Thursday, June 22, 2017...
  38. USS ALASKA

    Historic marker dedicated to Bristol railroad history and train station

    https://www.todaysphoto.org/potd/large/bristol-train-station.jpg Historic marker dedicated to Bristol railroad history and train station LEIF GREISS | BRISTOL HERALD COURIER Dec 4, 2018 Updated Dec 4, 2018 The land for the railroad facilities was donated in 1848 by the Rev. James King, and...


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