sharable

  1. RobertP

    Who knew all the cloth types!

    I have an old composition book that belonged to my Uncle Charlie with the title “Industries of Man.” It looks, by the handwriting to have been put together by him at about 10 years of age which would make it around 1920. I am guessing it was a school project. Here are two pages on fabrics...
  2. Tom Elmore

    Skirmish Duty of the 61st Virginia from July 3-5

    It was not until sunset on July 3, in the aftermath of the failed Confederate charge against Cemetery Ridge, that the 61st Virginia finally assumed an active role in the battle. Deployed as skirmishers in front of Long Lane, the 350 or so officers and enlisted men in the regiment took an...
  3. JPK Huson 1863

    Tiny Faces Beneath Kepis, Or, Armed And Eight Years Old

    From a fairly well known photo " Tasting the soup ", in public access on LoC, this kid isn't the main subject - it's adults tasting soup. He's scraping something from a tin pot, an unreadable expression on his face. And wearing a uniform. Must be around 10 or 11. From the photo of Christian...
  4. Andy Cardinal

    The world will never know its loss; but his friends will never forget theirs.

    (Photograph from John Banks's Blog) The greatest "what ifs" of the Civil War -- or any war -- occur when we consider the promise and potential of those whose lives were lost. An excellent example in reverse occurred at Antietam when Captain Oliver Wendell Holmes of the 20th Massachusetts was...
  5. SWMODave

    Is this woman who she claims?

    This article appeared in the Sacramento Union, Volume 165, Number 45, 14 June 1912. I have been unable to verify "any" part of the Civil War history given here. I thought I would share it and see if any history sleuth's can find something that I can't. Note - there is no evidence that any...
  6. JPK Huson 1863

    What A Messy, Boring Affair War Can Be

    It didn't take much browsing through this public access LoC image from City Point to catch a whole lot of mess. Between the disorganized dockside arrangements, supplies apparently tossed randomly onto barges, what looks like a floating homestead someone threw away and someone's compacted...
  7. Tom Elmore

    Lost and Found

    Part I At dawn on July 4 [5?], a passing Confederate handed a book to Mrs. John Shank, who was standing near the road at the hamlet of Seven Stars. In it, Mrs. Shank found the name of the original owner, Carrie [Caroline] McMillan, daughter of David McMillan, as well as the most recent owner...
  8. John Hartwell

    Dr Charles Campbell Guard, Surgeon, 29th Illinois Regiment

    [http://suvcw.org/past/ccguard.htm] Charles Campbell Guard was born on August 5, 1824, in the town of Equality, Gallatin County, Illinois. The source of his medical education is unknown, but by 1848, he was a practicing physician in nearby Harrisburg. By the time the war broke out, Dr. Guard...
  9. JPK Huson 1863

    Private Edward Gilkin, G.W.Custis And Arlington's Continuing Tapestry

    More like temple than home, Arlington House's façade is forgivably ostentatious. Forgivably because G.W. Custis's veritable monument to our nation's founding grew into these preposterous proportions by becoming a symbol of our ability to survive and those who gave their lives it do so...
  10. JPK Huson 1863

    Time For More Picket Stories, Or, We Can DO This

    Another eyewitness view of the shattered bridge at Fredericksburg. The famous photo of Mississippi troops staring at the photographer from across a chasm seems only part of the story. From Alfred Waud's "Union soldiers exchanging salutations with the Confederates at Fredericksburg, Va." LoC...
  11. JPK Huson 1863

    How To Annoy Two Commanding Generals And Maybe Get Yourself Arrested, July 1863

    We're very familiar with the 1863 sign within Evergreen Cemetery's gates prohibiting the discharge of firearms. Shattered windows on the Masser's side of the gatehouse and general debris beneath Elizabeth Thorn's laundry indicate perhaps no one saw it. The burnt bodies encountered by Elizabeth...
  12. JPK Huson 1863

    " Marriage In Tennessee ", Building A Groom From Scratch

    Image from Godey's 1862 has always made me smile. A hopefully unrealistic illustration in that issue's wedding section includes this, five brides frilled to the gills. I found it a little surreal, too. Symbolism can be found in weird places. It wasn't intentional creating a thread on a topic...
  13. Andy Cardinal

    "A Career Which Nothing But Death Could Terminate in Failure"

    Colonel Henry Walter Kingsbury was a promising young officer full of potential when he was mortally wounded at the Battle of Antietam on September 17, 1862. Kingsbury was born on Christmas Day, 1836. Henry's father Julius was a career army officer who had graduated from West Point in 1823...
  14. Buckeye Bill

    The Washington Monument at South Mountain, Maryland

    * The Washington Monument State Park is a public recreation area located approximately four miles east of Boonsboro, Maryland. The park preserves the Washington Monument, a 40-foot-tall tower honoring George Washington, the first President of the United States. The monument, which sits near the...
  15. JPK Huson 1863

    Which Steamer? Photographic Puzzles From War's Wharf

    City Point, a treasure trove of an image. Beyond the soldier's tent, there's a flat boat, a horse tied up next to an open door, a supply wagon and steamers, tugs, schooners and gunboats. It's a little awesome seeing a gunboat crew dangling feet above the water, savoring City Point's relative...
  16. Mike Serpa

    Golden Thread MOH recipients A-B

    I recently donated over 700 restored photos of about 550 Civil War Medal of Honor recipients to the American Battlefield Trust. The Spring 2019 issue of the trust's Hallowed Ground magazine shows some of the photos. A colorized photo of MOH recipient Samuel C. Wright (by coincidence my avatar)...
  17. JPK Huson 1863

    Behind The Image, An Act Of Kindness, Camp Letterman, 1863

    Because this Tyson Brothers image of Gettysburg's Letterman Hospital includes a woman who is probably nurse it's one of my favorites. Not knowing who any of these eye witnesses to history were can drive you a little crazy although I live in hope the nurse is Sophronia Bucklin. Who were they...
  18. Kazziga

    Easter egg CSS Manassas

    Here is the Easter egg version of the CSS Manassas built yesterday by yours truly using an egg and pieces of paper. Happy Easter to those who celebrate and a great day to all the others!
  19. John Hartwell

    The Eventful Life of Seaman I. S. Mullen (1841-1930)

    Isaac S. Mullen ISAAC S. MULLEN was born in Stonington, Conn. on July 15, 1841, of mixed African-American and Native American ancestry, his mother being a Connecticut Mohegan (not to be confused with J. F. Cooper’s Mohicans). The family had moved to Salem, Mass. by 1857, at which time...
  20. JPK Huson 1863

    April Showers, War's Weirdly Worst Month

    Taken in May, after April's funeral train finally ended in Springfield, Illinois even Lincoln's horse Old Bob wears trappings of the mourning we'd been plunged into April 15th, 1865. April could have been missed in 1865 and really, through the rest of the war. What is it with April? Old Bob...
  21. JPK Huson 1863

    Before Chocolate Bunnies And Plastic Grass, Ten Pretty True Easter Traditions

    Pagan gods and goddesses of the sun are too numerous to list, those in charge of sunrise appearing in most cultures across the globe. Image is from 1556, a god making sure the world had a new beginning. ' Easter ', the word seems to have been adopted because the Saxon goddess Eastre was on duty...
  22. JPK Huson 1863

    Dead Stuff On Your Head, Our Easter Bonnets, 1863

    From Godey's 1862. Hat, bottom right may or may not have a deceased bird preceding the wearer through doors while top row, middle seems to have stuffed hummingbird struggling to free itself from bounteous velvet. Dead stuff on our heads was high fashion. Fashion around 1863 took a weird turn...
  23. John Hartwell

    "The ladies of Stockbridge feel an earnest interest..."

    [Mass. Historical Society Online Collections] Captain Goodwin. Sir I am informed that the volunteers from Stockbridge, all belong to your company I have therefore taken the liberty of addressing to you, (Care of Mr Abbott) a box, containing clothing for them, which I beg you to distribute...
  24. Eleanor Rose

    Recreated Tarheel Pound Cake

    According to Anne Byrn, author of American Cake, the first mention of pound cake is in a recipe dated 1754 from Wicomico Church, Virginia. An 1824 version of the cake was published in Mary Randolph's, The Virginia Housewife. Southerners love pound cake and love variations on the traditional...
  25. DBF

    To Emma With Love

    Find a Grave Emma Hurlburt Rawlins It began at the Lum house after the surrender of Vicksburg and it would end a little more than 6 years later when John A. Rawlins would succumb to the illness that had taken his 1st wife in 1861. It was at the William Samuel Lum house where General Grant...
  26. JPK Huson 1863

    Ford's Theater Played Lincoln's Mourning, His Last Act, 154 Years Ago Today April 14th, 1865

    " Octoroon ", the next play's bill is posted elsewhere from Ford's. The joyous displays from D.C.'s Grand Illumination a few days previously are gone, replaced by mourning crepe. April 14th, 1865, 154 years ago today a man ran from the doors of this theater, claimed his horse from the boy he...
  27. JPK Huson 1863

    Another Picket Story, Playing Peace On The Rappahannock

    Somewhere near Fredericksburg, pontoons across the river join two sides. Wagons and planks in foreground, men ( engineers? ) enjoying peace, however temporary. Gardner's print didn't catch the pickets along the Rappahannock, if he had he may have witnessed peace in that camp, too. Always keep...
  28. Tom Elmore

    Last Artillery Shots on July 4

    The sun appeared briefly on the horizon at 4:36 a.m. on July 4, before being enveloped by a thick overcast that foreshadowed a rainy day. Occasional artillery shots were exchanged in the morning, according to Captain William W. Chamberlaine, a member of the Third Corps artillery staff. While...
  29. Buckeye Bill

    The Battle of Fort Pillow (Fort Pillow Massacre)

    The Battle of Fort Pillow (Fort Pillow Massacre) was fought on April 12th, 1864. Fort Pillow is located on the Mississippi River in Henning, Tennessee. This American Civil War battle ended with a massacre of black Federal troops and their white officers attempting to surrender by soldiers under...
  30. JPK Huson 1863

    Who Needs A Blockade? The Confederacy's May 1861 ' No Dolls And Toys ' Act

    From Frank Leslie's, Blockade runner Wando, first named " Let Her Rip " was finally captured by Union forced in 1864. " About 8 o'clock she opened on her at long range with the 100-pounder rifle and forward 30-pounder, and continued firing until 10:30 -- firing 98 shells -when the Wando...
  31. JPK Huson 1863

    Redoshi And Clotilda's Last Passenger, As Told By Aunt Sally Smith, 1860 To 1937

    There are photos snipped from a video found in our National Archives of Redoshi as an elderly woman. Although our archives are public access, I'm not clear on whether a snip taken can be considered the same so won't attempt to use one. Image is of an HMS patrol ( HMS Dryan? ) chasing one of the...
  32. SWMODave

    Her Name Was Redoshi

    She Survived a Slave Ship, the Civil War and the Depression. Her Name Was Redoshi. It has long been believed that a man named Cudjo Lewis was the last living survivor of the trans-Atlantic slave trade in the United States. Now a researcher at Newcastle University in Britain says she has...
  33. Robert Gray

    Clover Hill Tavern.

    The Clover Hill Tavern at Appomattox Court House. Timothy O'Sullivan (Library of Congress) The tavern originally opened in 1819 on the Richmond-Lynchburg Road for travelers and is the oldest original structure in the village of Appomattox Court House. By 1865, the tavern had come on hard times...
  34. SWMODave

    I thought a thousand ****s but uttered none.

    The new vocation took the boy war correspondent, now in his twentieth year, to Cairo in the early weeks of 1862. And quickly came his baptism of fire. Commodore Foote was preparing for his water attack on Fort Donelson in a bend of the Cumberland river. He was suffering from a rheumatic hand...
  35. JPK Huson 1863

    Period Grits, Greens, Scrapple And Succotash, What's Yours, Where And Why?

    Wonderfully entitled ' Harvest Dance ', I'm fairly sure harvest celebrations looked a little different. The theme was the same, celebrating the fact there'd be food to last through another long winter until Spring brought garden sprouts and the beginnings of another harvest. What was harvested...
  36. JPK Huson 1863

    Carrie Sheads Had Company; " Some Ladies Of The Town " Save The 6th Wisconsin's Colors

    Using an image a little perfect for the thread, an enlarged snip from an LoC photo. Two ladies are crossing Chambersburg Pike, in front of Elias Shead's house, Gettysburg. Oak Ridge Seminary is elsewhere, this was the Shead's family home. Principal of the school, Carrie famously hid 97th New...
  37. JPK Huson 1863

    154th New York's Posthumous Celebrity, Amos Homiston, A Newspaper ' What?? ', September, 1865

    Harness maker Amos Homiston enlisted in the 154th New York Infantry unaware that one photograph would launch him so firmly into national fame there would one day be a monument to him on the battlefield where he died. Philinda Homiston Barnes, mother of 3 children orphaned July 1st at...
  38. John Hartwell

    Hate Mail for the President

    No sooner had the election returns come in that November of 1860, than huge piles of mail and telegrams began pouring in to Springfield, addressed to the new president-elect. There were the congratulatory missives,of course, many of them hinting (more or less delicately) at hopes of a government...
  39. Northern Light

    Rebecca Usher: A Maine Women Goes to War

    From the Maine Memory Network: Rebecca Usher: "To succor the suffering soldiers" Rebecca Usher, Hollis, ca. 1900Item Contributed by Maine Historical Society Text by Candace Kanes Images from Maine Historical Society Before women...
  40. Buckeye Bill

    Battle of Shiloh (Early Morning Attack)

    * Early morning attack Before 6 a.m. on Sunday, April 6th, 1862, Confederate General Albert S. Johnston's army was deployed for battle, straddling the Corinth Road. The army had spent the entire night making a camp in order of battle within 2 miles of the Federal camp near Major General William...


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