Places to Visit - Stones, Structures, & More

This forum contains profiles of Monuments, Memorials, Battlefield Structures, Landmarks, and other Points of Interest from the history of the American Civil War.
State of Florida Monument ©Michael Kendra, taken about 2003. :CSA1stNat: MONUMENT PROFILE Battlefield: Gettysburg National Military Park, Pennsylvania Location: West Confederate Avenue, South of the Biesecker Woods Map Coordinates: +39° 48' 36.43", -77° 15' 14.44" Men Engaged at Gettysburg from Florida: 740 Gettysburg Casualties from Florida: 455 or 62% MONUMENT DETAILS Designer: J.B. Hill Fabricator: Bruns Monumental Co. Dedicated: July 3, 1963 Dimensions: Sculpture: Height: 14 ft. 3 in.; Base: 11 ft. 8 in. x 4 ft. 6 in. Description: Two granite tablet markers, one taller than the other, and a pylon decorated with laurel leaves at the top, all mounted on a three-stepped base. The taller marker has the Florida State Seal on the front and back. Cost: $20,000.00 (July 1963) MONUMENT TEXT Floridans of Perry's Brigade, comprised of the 2nd, 5th, and 8th Florida Infantry, fought here with great honor as members of Anderson's Division of Hill's Corps, and participated in the heaviest fighting of July 2 and 3, 1863. The Brigade suffered 445 casualties of the 700 men present for duty." "Like all Floridians who participated in the Civil War, they fought with courage and devotion for the ideals in which they believed. By their noble example of bravery and endurance, they enable us to meet with confidence any sacrifice which confronts us as Americans." "Gettysburg Memoril Commssion; Adam G. Adams, Chairman; Mrs. Wilson D. Baker; Paul W. Danahy, Jr.; Farris Bryant, Governor. RELATED LINKS https://www.gettysburgdaily.com/florida-state-monument/ http://gettysburg.stonesentinels.com/confederate-monuments/confederate-state-monuments/florida/ The following information is provided for citations. Article Title: State of Florida Monument Authors: ★ CivilWarTalk Website Name: CivilWarTalk.com URL: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/state-of-florida-monument-gettysburg.165305/ Publisher: CivilWarTalk, LLC Original Published Date: June 1, 2021 Located at Gettysburg National Military Park, in Adams County, Pennsylvania (rev.6/1/21) National Monuments Eternal Light Peace Memorial ★ Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial ★ High Water Mark Lincoln Speech Memorial ★ Soldiers' National Monument U.S. State Monuments DE ★ IN ★ MD ★ NY ★ NY Auxiliary ★ PA ★ VT ★ U.S. Regulars C.S. State Monuments AL ★ AR ★ DE ★ FL ★ GA ★ LA ★ MD ★ MS ★ NC ★ SC ★ TN ★ TX ★ VA Union Regimentals CT ★ DE ★ IL ★ IN ★ ME ★ MD ★ MA ★ MI ★ MN NH ★ NJ ★ NY ★ OH ★ PA ★ RI ★ VT ★ WV ★ WI ★ U.S. Regulars
State of North Carolina Monument :CSA1stNat: ©Michael Kendra, about 2003. MONUMENT PROFILE Battlefield: Gettysburg National Military Park, Pennsylvania Location: Seminary Ridge east of West Confederate Avenue Map Coordinates: +39° 49' 5.88", -77° 14' 49.92" Men Engaged at Gettysburg from North Carolina: 14,150 Gettysburg Casualties from North Carolina: 6,160 or 43% MONUMENT DETAILS Artist: Borglum, Gutzon, sculptor Kunst Foundry, founder Dedicated: July 3, 1929 Dimensions: Sculpture: H. 15 ft. 9 in. Base: 9 ft. 9 in. x 6 ft. 6 in. Cost: $50,000.00 (July 1929) for the Monument and property. Description: A bronze group of five figures representing North Carolina infantrymen charging forward in the midst of battle. Three of the figures carry guns, one carries a flag, and one kneels on the ground and points toward the enemy with his proper left hand. The monument is enclosed with a metal fence. The monument has two narrative marker monoliths, one standing, one laying horizontal on the ground. Remarks: Four small stone markers denote the property purchased by the State of North Carolina in 1927. (Estimated to be .84 Acres or 200' across by 184' deep, or 36,400 ft.2 ) MONUMENT TEXT 1863 NORTH CAROLINA TO THE ETERNAL GLORY OF THE NORTH CAROLINA SOLDIERS. WHO ON THIS BATTLEFIELD DISPLAYED HEROISM UNSURPASSED SACRIFICING ALL IN SUP- PORT OF THEIR CAUSE.THEIR VALOROUS DEEDS WILL BE ENSHRINED IN THE HEARTS OF MEN LONG AFTER THESE TRANSIENT MEMORIALS HAVE CRUM- BLED INTO DUST. THIRTY TWO NORTH CAROLINA REGIMENTS WERE IN ACTION AT GETTYSBURG JULY 1,2,3, 1863. ONE CON- FEDERATE SOLDIER IN EVERY FOUR WHO FELL HERE WAS A NORTH CAROLINIAN. __________________________________________ THIS TABLET ERECTED BY THE NORTH CAROLINA DIVISION UNITED DAUGHTERS OF THE CONFEDERACY. NORTH CAROLINA ORGANIZATIONS IN THE ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA AT THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG JULY 1-3, 1863 6TH, 21ST, 57TH INFANTRY - HOKE'S BRIGADE OF EARLY'S DIVISION 1ST, 3RD INFANTRY - STEUART'S BRIGADE OF JOHNSON'S DIVISION 32ND, 43RD, 45TH, 53RD INFANTRY AND 2ND BATTALION - DANIEL'S BRIGADE OF RODES' DIVISION 5TH, 12TH, 20TH, 23RD INFANTRY - IVERSON'S BRIGADE OF RODES' DIVISION 2ND, 4TH, 14TH, 30TH INFANTRY - RAMSEUR'S BRIGADE OF RODES' DIVISION 11TH, 26TH, 47TH, 52ND INFANTRY - PETTIGREW'S BRIGADE OF HETH'S DIVISION 55TH INFANTRY - DAVIS' BRIGADE OF HETH'S DIVISION 7TH, 18TH, 28TH, 33RD, 37TH INFANTRY - LANE'S BRIGADE OF PENDER'S DIVISION 13TH, 16TH, 22ND, 34TH, 38TH INFANTRY - SCALES DIVISION 1ST NORTH CAROLINA ARTILLERY, BATTERY A - MCLAWS DIVISION BRANCH (NORTH CAROLINA) ARTILLERY \ ROWAN (NORTH CAROLINA) ARTILLERY- / HOOD'S DIVISION CHARLOTTE (NORTH CAROLINA) ARTILLERY - PENDER'S DIVISION 1ST CAVALRY - HAMPTON'S BRIGADE ----------\ 2ND, 4TH CAVALRY - ROBERTSON'S BRIGADE - } STUART'S DIVISION OF CAVALRY 5TH CAVALRY - W.H.F. LEE'S BRIGADE ---------/ MONUMENT HISTORY A 1913 North Carolina commission of Civil War veterans presented a monument proposal after visiting the Gettysburg Battlefield, and after World War I, the North Carolina United Daughters of the Confederacy and Governor Angus McLean continued the planning in 1927, with a commission visiting the battlefield on September 28th, 1926. North Carolina appropriated $50,000.00 to purchase and landscape the site and to commission Gutzon Borglum, who was approached while working on Mount Rushmore. Borglum designed the monument in Texas and posed the Confederate flag designer (Orren Smith) as the flag bearer, while the other soldiers were sculpted from photographs of posed Confederate soldiers. Postponed from May 1929, the US Navy and 6th Field Artillery bands played at the monument's dedication on July 3, 1929. By 1949, a glass-faced display at the site, and a wooden marker for the site was cut down by vandals in 1954. President Kennedy left his car to visit the monument in April 1963 prior to the rededication on the 100th anniversary. After a 1985 restoration required lifting by helicopter for shipment to Cincinnati, a fence was added in 1993; and after the 1995 Smithsonian's Save Outdoor Sculpture! survey reported the sculpture needed treatment, the monument was rehabilitated in 1999. MONUMENT DEDICATION - Click on image to zoom in - https://archive.org/details/speechofhonwalte00murp/mode/2up ADDITIONAL PHOTOS Monument Dedication Day, July 3, 1929. From left to right State Auditor Baxter Durham, Gov. Angus McLean, Gov. O. Max Gardner and State Adjutant General J. Vann B. Metts. Image from the N.C. Museum of History. Battlefield Guide Colonel Jacob Sheads leads a tour at the North Carolina State Monument for President John F. Kennedy and First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy, March 31, 1963. RELATED LINKS https://www.gettysburgdaily.com/foggy-morning-at-north-carolina/ https://www.hmdb.org/marker.asp?marker=11559 https://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WMEMBF_North_Carolina_Monument_Gettysburg_PA http://gettysburg.stonesentinels.com/confederate-monuments/confederate-state-monuments/north-carolina/ The following information is provided for citations. Article Title: State of North Carolina Monument (Gettysburg) Article Subject: Civil War Monuments, Structures, & Other Points of Interest Author: ★Mike Kendra, @CivilWarTalk Website Name: CivilWarTalk.com URL: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/state-of-north-carolina-monument-gettysburg.165445/ Publisher: CivilWarTalk, LLC Original Published Date: February 27, 2020 Located at Gettysburg National Military Park, in Adams County, Pennsylvania (rev.6/1/21) National Monuments Eternal Light Peace Memorial ★ Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial ★ High Water Mark Lincoln Speech Memorial ★ Soldiers' National Monument U.S. State Monuments DE ★ IN ★ MD ★ NY ★ NY Auxiliary ★ PA ★ VT ★ U.S. Regulars C.S. State Monuments AL ★ AR ★ DE ★ FL ★ GA ★ LA ★ MD ★ MS ★ NC ★ SC ★ TN ★ TX ★ VA Union Regimentals CT ★ DE ★ IL ★ IN ★ ME ★ MD ★ MA ★ MI ★ MN NH ★ NJ ★ NY ★ OH ★ PA ★ RI ★ VT ★ WV ★ WI ★ U.S. Regulars
Brigadier General Samuel Wylie Crawford Monument ©Michael Kendra, taken between 1999 & 2005. :us34stars: MONUMENT PROFILE Battlefield: Gettysburg National Military Park, Pennsylvania Location: Plum Run Valley, East side of Crawford Avenue Leader of: 3rd Division, V Corps, Army of the Potomac :tinyus34: Map Coordinates: +39° 47' 44.52", -77° 14' 19.68" Biography: Samuel Wylie Crawford MONUMENT DETAILS Artists: Sculptor: Ron Tunison Founder: Tallix Inc., Beacon, New York Dedicated: June 25, 1988 Dimensions: Sculpture: H. 182 in. Base: 3 ft. x 60 in. x 48 in. Weight: 2000 lbs. Base Material: A Natural boulder from Crawford's Franklin Country Description: Full-length bronze portrait of Brig. Gen. Samuel W. Crawford stands on a rock base. He is in the uniform of his rank, including a wide-brimmed hat. A sword hangs at his proper left side. He holds a flagpole vertically in both gloved hands, braced against his proper right knee. The flag has been cast with 34 bullet holes, one for each state in the Union, North and South. One bullet hole goes all the way through the statue, and if counted twice, once for Virginia, then again for West Virginia, you'd get 35, as West Virginia was the 35th State, and only recently admitted to the Union in 1863. MONUMENT TEXT Brigadier General Samuel Wylie Crawford Commander of the Pennsylvania Reserves 1829-1892 RELATED LINKS Gettysburg Daily: https://www.gettysburgdaily.com/gettysburg-idols-part-7-gettysburg-licensed-battlefield-guide-joe-mieczkowski/ Gettysburg Sculptures: http://gettysburgsculptures.com/brig_general_samuel_crawford_monument The following information is provided for citations. Article Title: Brigadier General Samuel Wylie Crawford Monument (Gettysburg) Authors: ★ CivilWarTalk Website Name: CivilWarTalk.com URL: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/brigadier-general-samuel-wylie-crawford-monument-gettysburg.185687/ Publisher: CivilWarTalk, LLC Original Published Date: June 2, 2021 Located at Gettysburg National Military Park, in Adams County, Pennsylvania (rev.6/1/21) National Monuments Eternal Light Peace Memorial ★ Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial ★ High Water Mark Lincoln Speech Memorial ★ Soldiers' National Monument U.S. State Monuments DE ★ IN ★ MD ★ NY ★ NY Auxiliary ★ PA ★ VT ★ U.S. Regulars C.S. State Monuments AL ★ AR ★ DE ★ FL ★ GA ★ LA ★ MD ★ MS ★ NC ★ SC ★ TN ★ TX ★ VA Union Regimentals CT ★ DE ★ IL ★ IN ★ ME ★ MD ★ MA ★ MI ★ MN NH ★ NJ ★ NY ★ OH ★ PA ★ RI ★ VT ★ WV ★ WI ★ U.S. Regulars
State of Alabama Monument ©Michael Kendra, taken between 1999 & 2005. :CSA1stNat: MONUMENT PROFILE Battlefield: Gettysburg National Military Park, Pennsylvania Location: South Confederate Avenue Map Coordinates: +39° 47' 9.60", -77° 15' 15.48" Men Engaged at Gettysburg from Alabama: 5,930 Gettysburg Casualties from Alabama: 2,250 or 38% MONUMENT DETAILS Origin: Alabama Division of the United daughters of the Confederacy about 1927 Artist: Joseph Urner Contractors: Stone Work: Hammacker Brothers Foundry Work: Roman Bronze Company Dedicated: November 12, 1933 Dimensions: Sculpture: 7 ft. 9 in. x 10 ft. 9 in. x 35 in. Base: 33 in. x 11 ft. 4 in. x 5 ft. 2 in. Weight: 28.5 tons. Cost: $12,000.00 (November 1933) Description: Atop a Vermont large granite base stands a bronze figure group composed of an allegorical female figure representing the Spirit of the Confederacy flanked a wounded soldier on her proper right and an armed soldier on her proper left. With her raised proper left arm she urges the armed soldier to continue fighting and with her lowered proper right arm she gently restrains the wounded soldier from further combat. The figures are installed against a granite wall which rests atop three granite steps. MONUMENT TEXT ALABAMANS! YOUR NAMES ARE INSCRIBED ON FAME'S IMMORTAL SCROLL. UNVEILED NOVEMBER 12, 1933 BY THE ALABAMA DIVISION UNITED DAUGHTERS OF THE CONFEDERACY RELATED LINKS https://www.gettysburgdaily.com/the-alabama-monument-at-gettysburg/ http://gettysburg.stonesentinels.com/confederate-monuments/confederate-state-monuments/alabama/ The following information is provided for citations. Article Title: State of Alabama Monument (Gettysburg) Authors: ★ CivilWarTalk Website Name: CivilWarTalk.com URL: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/state-of-alabama-monument-gettysburg.165144/ Publisher: CivilWarTalk, LLC Original Published Date: June 2, 2021 Located at Gettysburg National Military Park, in Adams County, Pennsylvania (rev.6/1/21) National Monuments Eternal Light Peace Memorial ★ Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial ★ High Water Mark Lincoln Speech Memorial ★ Soldiers' National Monument U.S. State Monuments DE ★ IN ★ MD ★ NY ★ NY Auxiliary ★ PA ★ VT ★ U.S. Regulars C.S. State Monuments AL ★ AR ★ DE ★ FL ★ GA ★ LA ★ MD ★ MS ★ NC ★ SC ★ TN ★ TX ★ VA Union Regimentals CT ★ DE ★ IL ★ IN ★ ME ★ MD ★ MA ★ MI ★ MN NH ★ NJ ★ NY ★ OH ★ PA ★ RI ★ VT ★ WV ★ WI ★ U.S. Regulars
Major General Henry W. Slocum Monument ©Michael Kendra, taken between 1999 & 2005. :us34stars: MONUMENT PROFILE Battlefield: Gettysburg National Military Park, Pennsylvania Location: Stevens Knoll, North side of Slocum Avenue Leader of: XII Corps, Army of the Potomac :tinyus34: Strength: 10,700 men, 20 guns Casualties: 205 killed; 810 wounded; 65 missing; 1,080 total Map Coordinates: +39° 49' 8.76", -77° 13' 28.56" Biography: Henry W. Slocum MONUMENT DETAILS Artists: Sculptor: Edward Clark Potter Designer: A. J. Zabriskie Founder: Gorham Manufacturing Company Fabricator: C. E. Tayntor & Company Dedicated: September 19, 1902 Dimensions: Sculpture: 15′ 6″ tall Base: 16′ tall, L. 11 ft. 9 3/4 in. x W. 4 ft. Statue Weight: 7,300 pounds Base Material: Barre Granite Cost: $29,941.57 Description: A bronze equestrian portrait of General Slocum standing on the knoll where he directed the movements of his soldiers in the XII Corps. The general is depicted holding his hat in his proper right hand and holding the horse's reins in his proper left hand. The sculpture is mounted on a rectangular Barre granite base adorned with two bronze inscription plaques. MONUMENT TEXT ★ MAJOR GENERAL HENRY WARNER SLOCUM, U.S.V. 1826-1894 —- IN COMMAND OF THE RIGHT WING OF THE ARMY OF THE POTOMAC AT THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG JULY 1, 2, 3, 1863 —- “STAY AND FIGHT IT OUT” GEN. SLOCUM AT COUNCIL OF WAR JULY 2, 1863 ERECTED BY THE STATE OF NEW YORK 1902 MAJOR GENERAL HENRY WARNER SLOCUM, U.S. VOLS. CADET U.S. MILITARY ACADEMY JULY 1, 1848. 2ND LIEUT. FIRST ARTILLERY JULY 1, 1852. 1ST LIEUT. MARCH 3, 1855. RESIGNED OCTOBER 31, 1856. COL. 27TH N.Y. INFANTRY MAY 21, 1861. SEVERELY WOUNDED BULL RUN JULY 21, 1861. BRIG. GEN’L. OF VOLUNTEERS AUGUST 9, 1861. ASSIGNED TO COMMAND OF 2ND BRIGADE, FRANKLIN’S DIVISION, ARMY OF THE POTOMAC SEPTEMBER 4, 1861 AND TO COMMAND OF THE 1ST DIVISION, 8TH CORPS MAY 18, 1862. MAJ. GEN’L. U.S. VOLS. JULY 4, 1862. ASSUMED COMMAND OF 12TH CORPS OCTOBER 20, 1862. TEMPORARILY COMMANDED THE RIGHT WING OF THE ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, CONSISTING OF THE 5TH, 11TH, AND 12TH CORPS APRIL 28-30, 1863. IN COMMAND OF THE RIGHT WING OF THE UNION ARMY COMPOSED OF THE 5TH AND 12TH CORPS AT GETTYSBURG JULY 1, 2, 3, 1863. RELINQUISHED COMMAND OF THE 12TH CORPS APRIL 18, 1864 AND ON APRIL 27, 1864 ASSUMED COMMAND OF THE MILITARY DISTRICT OF VICKSBURG, WHICH HE HELD UNTIL AUGUST 14, 1864. ASSUMED COMMAND OF THE 20TH CORPS AUGUST 27, 1864 AND THE LEFT WING OF SHERMAN’S ARMY KNOWN AS THE ARMY OF GEORGIA, NOVEMBER 11, 1864. ASSIGNED IN ORDERS DATED JUNE 27, 1865 TO COMMAND OF THE DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, HEADQUARTERS AT VICKSBURG WHICH HE HELD UNTIL RELIEVED SEPTEMBER 18, 1865 AND ON SEPTEMBER 28, 1865 GEN’L. SLOCUM RESIGNED FROM THE ARMY AND WAS HONORABLY DISCHARGED. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS Dedication Day Photo, Sept 19, 1902 LOC Photo, c.1902-1906 RELATED LINKS Stone Sentinels: https://gettysburg.stonesentinels.com/monuments-to-individuals/henry-slocum/ Gettysburg Sculptures: http://gettysburgsculptures.com/gen_slocum_equestrian_monument The following information is provided for citations. Article Title: Major General Henry W. Slocum Monument (Gettysburg) Authors: ★ CivilWarTalk Website Name: CivilWarTalk.com URL: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/major-general-henry-w-slocum-monument-gettysburg.185689/ Publisher: CivilWarTalk, LLC Original Published Date: June 2, 2021 Located at Gettysburg National Military Park, in Adams County, Pennsylvania (rev.6/1/21) National Monuments Eternal Light Peace Memorial ★ Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial ★ High Water Mark Lincoln Speech Memorial ★ Soldiers' National Monument U.S. State Monuments DE ★ IN ★ MD ★ NY ★ NY Auxiliary ★ PA ★ VT ★ U.S. Regulars C.S. State Monuments AL ★ AR ★ DE ★ FL ★ GA ★ LA ★ MD ★ MS ★ NC ★ SC ★ TN ★ TX ★ VA Union Regimentals CT ★ DE ★ IL ★ IN ★ ME ★ MD ★ MA ★ MI ★ MN NH ★ NJ ★ NY ★ OH ★ PA ★ RI ★ VT ★ WV ★ WI ★ U.S. Regulars
Sachs Covered Bridge LANDMARK PROFILE Also Known As: Adams County Bridge No. 1 PA State Bridge #8 (according to The Gettysburg Times on January 17, 1952) Sauck's Covered Bridge Sauches Covered Bridge (1863) Waterworks Bridge (1894-1913) Proper Pronounciation: Sachs is pronounced: SOX Battlefield: Near Gettysburg National Military Park Current Owner: Gettysburg Battlefield Preservation Association Previously: Adams County Historical Society Location (Construction Period): on the road from Gettysburg to Nunemaker's Mill Location (Modern): Waterworks Road, near Pumping Station Road, Adams County, Pennsylvania Crosses: Lower Marsh Creek Map Coordinates: 39°47'51" N, 77°16'34" W Admission: Free Listed on the National Register of Historic Places: August 25, 1980 Special Recognition: Designated Pennsylvania's "most historic bridge" in 1938 LANDMARK DETAILS Built: Circa 1852 / 1854 Type: Wooden "Town" Lattice Truss Single Span Covered Bridge Construction: Wood Types: Oak & Pine Bridge Length: 101 feet, 3 inches Roadway Width: 15 feet 4 inches Span: 95 feet, 8 inches Inside Clearance: 12 feet, 7 inches Structural Elements: "Town" Lattice Truss Bridge; Using wooden beams "cris-crossed" to form a lattice Based on a design patented by Architect Ithiel Town of Connecticut. Style Elements: It was originally "Covered" or clad with German siding and a metal roof. Architect: David S. Stoner 2010 by Chris 1852 Land Owned by: civilian John Pfoutz Cost to Build in 1854: $1,544.00 USD Historic Construction Contract Report: County commissioners are soliciting sealed bids for a "wooden bridge, latticed and roofed, over Marsh-creek, where the road leading from Gettysburg to Nunemaker's Mill crosses said Creek." - December 15, 1851 issue, The Adams Sentinel Land Surrounding Bridge Purchased in 1861 by: John Sachs (including 223 acres) Owner in 1863: Adams County Commissioners Historic Crossings During the Gettysburg Campaign: On July 1, 1863, the bridge was crossed by the two brigades of the I Corps of the Union Army heading towards Gettysburg. Sickle's Union Army III Corps crossed the bridge, heading to the Black Horse Tavern on July 1st. The majority of General Lee's Confederate Army retreated across the bridge after the battle ended. Closed to Automobile Traffic: 1968 Posted to the National Register of Historic Places: August 25, 1980 #80003395 Reconstructed: 1996-97 A foot of rain felt on the night of June 19, 1996, the flooding lifted the bridge off its abutments and washed it downstream 100 yards. The bridge was restored by Adams County using over 75% of its original structure. During it's rehabilitation, the truss structure was supported by steel beams, and raised about 3 feet to relieve future flood water issues. Bridge Rededicated: July 21, 1997 RELATED LINKS https://www.gettysburgdaily.com/sachs-covered-bridge-on-new-years-eve/ The following information is provided for citations. Article Title: Sachs Covered Bridge (Gettysburg) Authors: ★ CivilWarTalk Website Name: CivilWarTalk.com URL: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/sachs-covered-bridge-gettysburg.184622/ Publisher: CivilWarTalk, LLC Original Published Date: June 2, 2021 Located at Gettysburg National Military Park, in Adams County, Pennsylvania (rev.6/1/21) National Monuments Eternal Light Peace Memorial ★ Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial ★ High Water Mark Lincoln Speech Memorial ★ Soldiers' National Monument U.S. State Monuments DE ★ IN ★ MD ★ NY ★ NY Auxiliary ★ PA ★ VT ★ U.S. Regulars C.S. State Monuments AL ★ AR ★ DE ★ FL ★ GA ★ LA ★ MD ★ MS ★ NC ★ SC ★ TN ★ TX ★ VA Union Regimentals CT ★ DE ★ IL ★ IN ★ ME ★ MD ★ MA ★ MI ★ MN NH ★ NJ ★ NY ★ OH ★ PA ★ RI ★ VT ★ WV ★ WI ★ U.S. Regulars
Major General John Sedgwick Monument ©Michael Kendra, taken between 1999 & 2005. :us34stars: MONUMENT PROFILE Battlefield: Gettysburg National Military Park, Pennsylvania Location: Sedgwick Avenue Leader of: 6th Corps, Army of the Potomac :tinyus34: Strength: 13,600 men, 48 guns Casualties: 27 killed; 185 wounded; 30 missing; 242 total Map Coordinates: +39° 47' 46.32", -77° 14' 2.04" Biography: John Sedgwick MONUMENT DETAILS Artists: Sculptor: Henry K. Bush-Brown Founder: Philadelphia’s Bureau Brothers Foundry Carver: Davis Granite Company Fabricator: Norcross Brothers Artist's Model Approved: November 1910 Dedicated: June 19, 1913 Base Material: Stony Creek Granite Dimensions: Sculpture: H. 15 ft. Base: 6 ft. x 12 ft. x 5 ft. 6 in. Cost: $25,000 appropriated by the Sedgwick monument committee after forming in May 1907 Description: A bronze equestrian portrait of General Sedgwick and his mount, Handsome Joe, soon after their arrival on the battlefield during the afternoon of July 2, 1863. The general is shown looking over the battlefield toward the Wheatfield and Sherfy Peach yard. The general wears his hat and carries his sword on his left side. The sculpture is mounted on a rectangular Stony Creek granite base adorned with bronze plaques. It is installed near the location of Sedgwick's headquarters during the battle. MONUMENT TEXT ERECTED BY THE STATE OF CONNECTICUT IN GRATEFUL MEMORY OF THE SERVICE GIVEN TO THE NATION BY HER HONORED SON JOHN SEDGWICK LOYAL CITIZEN, ILLUSTRIOUS SOLDIER BELOVED COMMANDER MAJOR GENERAL JOHN SEDGWICK IN COMMAND OF THE SIXTH CORP ARMY OF THE POTOMAC AT CHANCELLORSVILLE, GETTYSBURG, THE WILDERNESS, AND SPOTSYLVANIA BORN AT CORNWALL, CONN. SEPTEMBER 13TH 1813 KILLED AT SPOTSYLVANIA, VA. MAY 9TH 1864 ADDITIONAL PHOTOS Dedication Day June 19th, 1913 Base pre-equestrian installed. RELATED LINKS https://gettysburg.stonesentinels.com/monuments-to-individuals/john-sedgwick/ http://gettysburgsculptures.com/gen_sedgwick_equestrian_monument https://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WMC43B_Major_General_John_Sedgwick_Equestrian_Statue_Gettysburg_PA The following information is provided for citations. Article Title: Major General John Sedgwick Monument (Gettysburg) Authors: ★ CivilWarTalk Website Name: CivilWarTalk.com URL: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/major-general-john-sedgwick-monument-gettysburg.185680/ Publisher: CivilWarTalk, LLC Original Published Date: June 2, 2021 Located at Gettysburg National Military Park, in Adams County, Pennsylvania (rev.6/1/21) National Monuments Eternal Light Peace Memorial ★ Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial ★ High Water Mark Lincoln Speech Memorial ★ Soldiers' National Monument U.S. State Monuments DE ★ IN ★ MD ★ NY ★ NY Auxiliary ★ PA ★ VT ★ U.S. Regulars C.S. State Monuments AL ★ AR ★ DE ★ FL ★ GA ★ LA ★ MD ★ MS ★ NC ★ SC ★ TN ★ TX ★ VA Union Regimentals CT ★ DE ★ IL ★ IN ★ ME ★ MD ★ MA ★ MI ★ MN NH ★ NJ ★ NY ★ OH ★ PA ★ RI ★ VT ★ WV ★ WI ★ U.S. Regulars
Major General George G. Meade Monument ©Michael Kendra, taken between 1999 & 2005. :us34stars: MONUMENT PROFILE Battlefield: Gettysburg National Military Park, Pennsylvania Location: Cemetery Ridge, East of Hancock Avenue, Leister Farm Leader of: Army of the Potomac :tinyus34: Strength: 93,540 men, 360 guns Casualties: 3,150 killed; 14,500 wounded; 5,150 missing; 22,800 total Map Coordinates: +39° 48' 50.04", -77° 14' 5.28" Biography: George G. Meade MONUMENT DETAILS Artists: Sculptor: Henry K. Bush-Brown Founder: Philadelphia’s Bureau Brothers Foundary Dedicated: June 5, 1896 Dimensions: Sculpture: 11 ft. 4 in. tall Base: 9 ft. 7 in. x 7 ft. 10 in. x 14 ft. 2 1/2 in. Cost: $37,500.00, paid for by the State of Pennsylvania The State of PA Budgeted $30,000.00 for the bronze statue, and an additional $8000.00 for the pedestal Description: A bronze equestrian portrait of General Meade looking out over the battlefield where the Union army under his direction won one of its greatest battles. He holds a pair of binoculars in his proper right hand and his hat in his proper left hand. A sword hangs from the left side of his saddle. The horse depicted is known as “Old Baldy”. Notable Record: First Bronze Equestrian Monument Dedicated at Gettysburg MONUMENT TEXT MAJOR GENERAL GEORGE GORDON MEADE UNITED STATES ARMY COMMANDER OF THE ARMY OF THE POTOMAC BORN-DECEMBER 31 1815 ------ DIED-NOVEMBER 6 1872 CADET U.S.M.A. SEPT 1,1831; BREVET SECOND LIEUT. 3D U.S. ARTILLERY JULY 1, 1835; SECOND LIEUT. DECEMBER 31, 1835; RESIGNED AND HONORABLY DISCHARGED OCTOBER 26, 1836; SECOND LIEUT. TOPOGRAPHICAL ENGINEERS MAY 19, 1842; FIRST LIEUT. AUGUST 4, 1851; CAPTAIN MAY 19, 1856; "FOR FOURTEEN YEARS CONTINUOUS SERVICE" MAJOR JULY 18, 1862 (MERGED INTO CORPS OF ENGINEERS MARCH 3, 1863); VACATED COMMISSION JULY 3, 1863 BRIG.-GENERAL U.S. ARMY JULY 3, 1863; MAJOR GENERAL AUGUST 18, 1864. BREVETTED FIRST LIEUT. U.S. ARMY SEPTEMBER 23, 1846, "FOR GALLANT CONDUCT IN THE SEVERAL CONFLICTS AT MONTEREY, MEXICO," BRIG.-GENERAL U.S. VOLUNTEERS AUGUST 31, 1861; MAJOR-GENERAL NOVEMBER 29, 1862; VACATED COMMISSION IN VOLUNTEER SERVICE DECEMBER 6, 1864. THE SENATE AND HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA IN CONGRESS ASSEMBLED RESOLVED (JOINT RESOLUTION APPROVED JANUARY 28, 1864) "THAT THE GRATITUDE OF THE AMERICAN PEOPLE AND THE THANKS OF THEIR REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS ARE DUE, AND ARE HEREBY TENDERED ** TO MAJOR-GENERAL GEORGE G. MEADE ** AND THE OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS OF THAT ARMY (ARMY OF THE POTOMAC) FOR THE SKILL AND HEROIC VALOR WHICH AT GETTYSBURG REPULSED, DEFEATED, AND DROVE BACK, BROKEN AND DISPIRITED, BEYOND THE RAPPAHANNOCK, THE VETERAN ARMY OF THE REBELLION." ADDITIONAL PHOTOS Taken shortly after dedication, 1896. The Meade Monument as viewed with The National Tower behind it. RELATED LINKS Stone Sentinels: http://gettysburg.stonesentinels.com/monuments-to-individuals/george-meade/ Gettysburg Sculptures: http://gettysburgsculptures.com/maj-gen_meade_equestrian_monument Gettysburg Daily: https://www.gettysburgdaily.com/happy-birthday-and-happy-anniversary-george-gordon-meade/ The following information is provided for citations. Article Title: Major General George G. Meade Monument (Gettysburg) Authors: ★ CivilWarTalk Website Name: CivilWarTalk.com URL: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/major-general-george-g-meade-monument-gettysburg.185678/ Publisher: CivilWarTalk, LLC Original Published Date: June 2, 2021 Located at Gettysburg National Military Park, in Adams County, Pennsylvania (rev.6/1/21) National Monuments Eternal Light Peace Memorial ★ Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial ★ High Water Mark Lincoln Speech Memorial ★ Soldiers' National Monument U.S. State Monuments DE ★ IN ★ MD ★ NY ★ NY Auxiliary ★ PA ★ VT ★ U.S. Regulars C.S. State Monuments AL ★ AR ★ DE ★ FL ★ GA ★ LA ★ MD ★ MS ★ NC ★ SC ★ TN ★ TX ★ VA Union Regimentals CT ★ DE ★ IL ★ IN ★ ME ★ MD ★ MA ★ MI ★ MN NH ★ NJ ★ NY ★ OH ★ PA ★ RI ★ VT ★ WV ★ WI ★ U.S. Regulars
Lincoln Speech Memorial © Michael Kendra, April 2002. :us34stars: MONUMENT PROFILE Battlefield: Gettysburg National Military Park, Pennsylvania Location: South Side of the National Cemetery Map Coordinates: +39° 49' 3.00", -77° 13' 54.84" MONUMENT DETAILS Artist: Sculptor: Henry K. Bush-Brown Fabricator: Van Amringe Granite Company Dedicated: January 24, 1912. Rededicated November 20, 1967 Dimensions: Sculpture: 2 ft. 9 in. x 1 ft. 6 1/2 in. x 1 ft. 3 in. Base: H. 8 ft. x W. 22 ft. Front plaques: 4 x 5 ft. Description: A bronze bust of Lincoln rests on a granite pedestal in the center of a curved granite wall. Flanking the bust are two rectangular bronze plaques, one inscribed with the Gettysburg Address and one inscribed with the text of a letter to Lincoln. Cost: $5,000.00 in 1895 Remarks: This monument is dedicated not to Lincoln, but to the speech he gave at the dedication of the Soldiers National Cemetery on November 19, 1863: the Gettysburg Address. The monument contains a bust of the president sculpted by Henry K. Bush-Brown, who also created the equestrian statues of Generals Meade, Reynolds and Sedgwick at Gettysburg. MONUMENT TEXT LINCOLN - ADDRESS MEMORIAL This monument commemorates Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address, November 19, 1863. The Address was delivered about 300 yards from this spot along upper Cemetery drive. The site is now marked by the Soldiers’ National Monument. Dedicated Jan. 24, 1912 – Sculptor, Henry Bush-Brown. FOUR SCORE AND SEVEN YEARS AGO OUR FATHERS BROUGHT FORTH ON THIS CONTINENT, A NEW NATION, CONCEIVED IN LIBERTY, AND DEDICATED TO THE PROPOSITION THAT ALL MEN ARE CREATED EQUAL. NOW WE ARE ENGAGED IN A GREAT CIVIL WAR, TESTING WHETHER THAT NATION, OR ANY NATION SO CONCEIVED AND SO DEDICATED, CAN LONG ENDURE. WE ARE MET ON A GREAT BATTLE-FIELD OF THAT WAR. WE HAVE COME TO DEDICATE A PORTION OF THAT FIELD, AS A FINAL RESTING PLACE FOR THOSE WHO HERE GAVE THEIR LIVES THAT THAT NATION MIGHT LIVE. IT IS ALTOGETHER FITTING AND PROPER THAT WE SHOULD DO THIS. BUT, IN A LARGER SENSE, WE CAN NOT DEDICATE—WE CAN NOT CONSECRATE—WE CAN NOT HALLOW—THIS GROUND. THE BRAVE MEN, LIVING AND DEAD—WHO STRUGGLED HERE, HAVE CONSECRATED IT FAR ABOVE OUR POOR POWER TO ADD OR DETRACT. THE WORLD WILL LITTLE NOTE, NOR LONG REMEMBER WHAT WE SAY HERE, BUT IT CAN NEVER FORGET WHAT THEY DID HERE. IT IS FOR US THE LIVING, RATHER, TO BE DEDICATED HERE TO THE UNFINISHED WORK WHICH THEY WHO FOUGHT HERE HAVE THUS FAR SO NOBLY ADVANCED. IT IS RATHER FOR US TO BE HERE DEDICATED TO THE GREAT TASK REMAINING BEFORE US—THAT FROM THESE HONORED DEAD WE TAKE INCREASED DEVOTION TO THAT CAUSE FOR WHICH THEY GAVE THE LAST FULL MEASURE OF DEVOTION—THAT WE HERE HIGHLY RESOLVE THAT THESE DEAD SHALL NOT HAVE DIED IN VAIN—THAT THIS NATION, UNDER GOD, SHALL HAVE A NEW BIRTH OF FREEDOM—AND THAT GOVERNMENT OF THE PEOPLE, BY THE PEOPLE, FOR THE PEOPLE, SHALL NOT PERISH FROM THE EARTH. THE SEVERAL STATES HAVING SOLDIERS IN THE ARMY OF THE POTOMAC WHO WERE KILLED AT THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG OR HAVE SINCE DIED AT THE VARIOUS HOSPITALS WHICH WERE ESTABLISHED IN THE VICINITY HAVE PROCURED GROUNDS ON A PROMINENT PART OF THE BATTLEFIELD FOR A CEMETERY AND ARE HAVING THE DEAD REMOVED TO THEM AND PROPERLY BURIED. THESE GROUNDS WILL BE CONSECRATED AND SET APART TO THIS SACRED PURPOSE ON THURSDAY THE 19TH INSTANT. IT IS THE DESIRE THAT YOU AS CHIEF EXECUTIVE OF THE NATION FORMALLY SET APART THESE GROUNDS TO THEIR SACRED USE BY A FEW APPROPRIATE REMARKS. IT WILL BE A SOURCE OF GREAT GRATIFICATION TO THE MANY WIDOWS AND ORPHANS THAT HAVE BEEN MADE ALMOST FRIENDLESS BY THE GREAT BATTLE HERE TO HAVE YOU HERE PERSONALLY AND IT WILL KINDLE ANEW IN THE BREASTS OF THE COMRADES OF THESE BRAVE DEAD WHO ARE NOW IN THE TENTED FIELD THAT THEY WHO SLEEP IN DEATH ON THE BATTLEFIELD ARE NOT FORGOTTEN BY THOSE HIGHEST IN AUTHORITY AND THEY WILL FEEL THAT SHOULD THEIR FATE BE THE SAME THEIR REMAINS WILL NOT BE UNCARED FOR. FROM LETTER OF INVITATION TO ABRAHAM LINCOLN, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES WHO ON NOVEMBER 19, 1863 NEAR THIS PLACE DELIVERED THE ADDRESS AT THE DEDICATION OF THE CEMETERY. ERECTED IN COMPLIANCE WITH ACT OF 53D CONGRESS 3D SESSION INTRODUCED BY MAJOR GENERAL DANIEL E. SICKLES REPRESENTATIVE FROM 10TH DISTRICT OF NEW YORK TO ESTABLISH A MILITARY PARK AT GETTYSBURG PENNSYLVANIA APPROVED BY THE PRESIDENT FEBRUARY 11 1895 ADDITIONAL PHOTOS Henry K. Bush-Brown’s 1912 bust of the 16th President Photo GettysburgDaily, May 2009. Site of Lincoln's Gettysburg Address Photo -Gary Todd, taken on July 19, 1978 RELATED LINKS https://www.gettysburgdaily.com/gettysburg-address-location/ https://gettysburg.stonesentinels.com/other-monuments/lincolns-gettysburg-address-memorial/ https://npsgnmp.wordpress.com/2014/11/14/lincoln-speech-memorial-repairrehabilitation/ The following information is provided for citations. Article Title: Lincoln Speech Memorial Authors: ★ CivilWarTalk Website Name: CivilWarTalk.com URL: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/lincoln-speech-memorial-gettysburg.165520/ Publisher: CivilWarTalk, LLC Original Published Date: June 2, 2021 Located at Gettysburg National Military Park, in Adams County, Pennsylvania (rev.6/1/21) National Monuments Eternal Light Peace Memorial ★ Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial ★ High Water Mark Lincoln Speech Memorial ★ Soldiers' National Monument U.S. State Monuments DE ★ IN ★ MD ★ NY ★ NY Auxiliary ★ PA ★ VT ★ U.S. Regulars C.S. 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© Mike Kendra, ‎April 18, 2009One of the most recognizable sites on the Lincoln Highway within Gettysburg is the Barn at the McPherson Farm. There was a tremendous amount of fighting here in the fields during the first day of the Battle of Gettysburg. The barn is the only structure that is left standing of the original farm. LANDMARK PROFILE Battlefield: Gettysburg National Military Park, Pennsylvania Location: near Chambersburg Pike (US Route 30) and Stone Avenue Intersection Map Coordinates: +39° 50' 15.09", -77° 15' 3.90" Occupants in July 1863: John Slentz and his family Owner in July 1863: Edward McPherson Current Owner: National Park Service LANDMARK DETAILS Farm Size: 95 acres Farm Structures in 1863: Farm House, Bank Barn, Corn Crib Barn Built: Likely between 1811-1823 Barn Dimensions: 61.0 x 40.6 feet Barn Square Footage: 4,951 square feet Structural: Walls: Fieldstone Foundation: Stone Framing: Wood Roof: Wood Shingles Barn Construction: A two-story frame and stone Pennsylvania bank barn on a stone foundation with a cantilevered forebay. The north and south stone walls with five embrasures and the east and west walls have vertical board siding. It has an unequal pitched gable roof that is covered with wood shingles. The earthen ramp to the upper level is on the west. Farm Property Purchased by the NPS: All Remaining Property Including Barn, 1904 McPherson Barn "Restoration", Historic American Buildings Survey, Page 2 of 4 Surveyed 1978, Drawn by Abraham Levy, Public Domain blueprint for the NPS Farm History: John B. McPherson Purchased the property, including the house and Bank Barn in January 1846, the purchase was completed at a Sherriff's sale, for a price of $2215.00 John Slentz applied to John B. McPherson to rent the farm sometime about 1858 The main Farm House burned to the ground in 1895 Repairs and Maintenance: In the 1960s, the NPS spent considerable time and research restoring the barn to it's 1863 appearance. The interior of barn was modified in late 1970s with inclusion of I-beams to stablize and reconstruct the lean-to sheds on west side. The barn roof was replaced in 2007. LANDMARK HISTORY Matthew Brady Photo, taken on or about July 15, 1863.Edward McPherson's farm was a half mile west of Gettysburg, atop the ridge that also bears his name. The area was the scene of intense fighting on July 1st, 1863, as Confederate General Henry Heth's Division advanced towards Gettysburg against defending Union cavalry under General John Buford. Union reinforcements from General John Reynolds' First Corps arrived and counterattacked, and fighting swirled through McPherson's pasturelands and two fields planted in corn and wheat, as well as through neighbor John Herbst's woods. During July 1 fighting here, barn was prominent landmark and used to shelter various Union regiments from artillery and small arms fire. Sharpshooters or snipers occupied barn and fired from embrasures located in gable walls. (CSA General Harry Heth later surmised he was wounded by a shot from this barn.) The position was overrun by overwhelming numbers of Confederate infantry on afternoon of July 1, stranding scores of wounded Union soldiers. These men lay unattended until July 6 when the barn and other McPherson buildings were hastily transformed into an emergency field hospital. The battle ruined the crops and pastures of McPherson's tenant farmer, John Slentz, and caused considerable damage to fences, buildings, property and supplies, for which McPherson was never compensated. McPherson sold the farm in 1868. The National Park Service bought the property in 1904 and now maintains the McPherson barn. The barn is currently used by a local farmer who also leases the McPherson fields. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS Photo after main house burned down, about 1895. McPherson Barn, About 1900 McPherson Barn, Early 1900's McPherson Barn "Restoration", Historic American Buildings Survey, Page 1 of 4 Surveyed 1978, Drawn by Abraham Levy, Public Domain blueprint for the NPS McPherson Barn "Restoration", Historic American Buildings Survey, Page 2 of 4 Surveyed 1978, Drawn by Abraham Levy, Public Domain blueprint for the NPS McPherson Barn "Restoration", Historic American Buildings Survey, Page 3 of 4 Surveyed 1978, Drawn by Abraham Levy, Public Domain blueprint for the NPS McPherson Barn "Restoration", Historic American Buildings Survey, Page 4 of 4 Surveyed 1978, Drawn by Abraham Levy, Public Domain blueprint for the NPS © Mike Kendra, April 18, 2009. As the Snow Falls on Christmas Eve © Mike Kendra, December 24, 2012. Snowfall © Mike Kendra, December 29, 2012 ADDITIONAL READING Stone's Brigade And The Fight For The Mcpherson Farm, by James J. Dougherty, 2000. RELATED LINKS Stone Sentinels Entry: http://www.gettysburg.stonesentinels.com/Places/McPherson.php Gettysburg Discussion Group: Historical Study http://www.gdg.org/Research/BattlefieldHistories/farmint.html Gettysburg Daily Post: http://www.gettysburgdaily.com/?p=1034 The following information is provided for citations. Article Title: McPherson Farm (Gettysburg) Authors: ★ CivilWarTalk Website Name: CivilWarTalk.com URL: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/mcpherson-farm-gettysburg.184398/ Publisher: CivilWarTalk, LLC Original Published Date: 6/2/2021 Located at Gettysburg National Military Park, in Adams County, Pennsylvania (rev.6/1/21) National Monuments Eternal Light Peace Memorial ★ Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial ★ High Water Mark Lincoln Speech Memorial ★ Soldiers' National Monument U.S. State Monuments DE ★ IN ★ MD ★ NY ★ NY Auxiliary ★ PA ★ VT ★ U.S. Regulars C.S. State Monuments AL ★ AK ★ DE ★ FL ★ GA ★ LA ★ MD ★ MS ★ NC ★ SC ★ TN ★ TX ★ VA Union Regimentals CT ★ DE ★ IL ★ IN ★ ME ★ MD ★ MA ★ MI ★ MN NH ★ NJ ★ NY ★ OH ★ PA ★ RI ★ VT ★ WV ★ WI ★ U.S. Regulars
State of Pennsylvania Memorial :us34stars: © Michael Kendra, April 2002. MONUMENT PROFILE Battlefield: Gettysburg National Military Park, Pennsylvania Location: At triangular block of Hancock, Humphreys, and Pleasanton Aves Map Coordinates: +39° 48' 27.72", -77° 14' 6.36" Men Engaged at Gettysburg from Pennsylvania: 23,410 Gettysburg Casualties from Pennsylvania: 5,885 or 25% MONUMENT DETAILS Proposed by: Senator Andrew G. Curtin in the 1880s He advocated for a "Pennsylvania Memorial Hall" to be built atop Little Round Top. The proposed building was included in an 1889 state appropriations bill, that was vetoed by Governor James A. Beaver Approved by: The Pennsylvania Legislature in 1909 They also appropriated $150,000 for construction of the memorial in February 1909 That present location for the monument was also chosen at that time. Scheduled Completion Date: July 1, 1910 Newspaper Clipping from: Gettysburg Compiler, August 17, 1910 Architect: W. Liance Cotrell Sculpter: Samuel A. Murray Contractors: Harrison Granite Co. Dedicated: Sept. 27, 1910 Military statues installed: April 1913 Memorial rededicated: July 4, 1913 Dimensions: Height 110 ft. x Width 100 ft. on each side Monument Weights: (Estimates made by Inspector of Construction - James G. Mitchell) Cut Granite Stone: 1,252 tons Broken Stone: 1,410 tons Sand: 740 tons Cement: 366 tons Steel Bars: 50 tons Bronze: 22 tons Total Weight: 3,840 tons Cost: $189,650.00 (1910-1913) Bronze Sculptures: Goddess of Victory and Peace (1909–10) by Samuel Murray, atop the monument's dome Height: 21 ft Weight: 7,500 lb Portrait statues: Pres. Abraham Lincoln (1911–1913) by J. Otto Schweizer, west side Gov. Andrew Curtin (1911–1913) by William Clark Noble, west side Gen. George Meade (1911–1913) by Lee Lawrie, north side Gen. John F. Reynolds (1911–1913) by Lee Lawrie, north side Gen. Winfield Scott Hancock (1911–1913) by Cyrus Edwin Dallin, east side Gen. David McMurtrie Gregg (1911–1913) by J. Otto Schweizer, east side Gen. Alfred Pleasonton (1911–1913) by J. Otto Schweizer, south side Gen. David B. Birney (1911–1913) by Lee Lawrie, south side Number of Bronze Tablets: 84 Tablet Size: 34 inches wide by 72 inches tall Number of Names Cast into Tablets, from Pennsylvania, who participated at Gettysburg: 2,133 Officers 32,114 Enlisted Men Description: The Pennsylvania State Memorial consists of four huge archways topped by a dome adorned with a bronze female figure representing the Goddess of Victory and Peace. In her proper right hand she holds up a sword and in her proper left hand she holds a palm leaf of peace. Above each archway are granite monoliths containing battle scenes honoring the four branches of the service. And in the spandrels flanking each archway are classical maidens, each holding either a trumpet or a wreath of victory. Eight bronze statues of military figures are installed in niches on either side of the archways. NPS Photo, Date Unknown. Remarks: In 1907, $150,000 was appropriated to erect a suitable memorial to honor all Pennsylvanians who participated in the battle at Gettysburg. The design submitted by architect W. Liance Cottrell was selected and the Harrison Granite Company was chosen to execute the design. Construction on the memorial began in the summer of 1909. However, at the time of the dedication on Sept. 27, 1910, the eight portrait statues Cottrell envisioned for the niches on either side of each archway were missing due to the lack of funds. In the year following the dedication, an additional $40,000 as appropriated to create the statues, and the Van Amringe Granite Company as given the contract. The statues were cast at the Gorham Manufacturing Company and were installed in April of 1913. Standing 110 feet high, the State of Pennsylvania monument is made of North Carolina granite set over an iron and concrete frame. Its base is lined with ninety bronze tablets listing the Pennsylvania regiments and batteries and the names of over 34,000 Pennsylvanians who participated in the battle. Bronze statues of Pennsylvania generals George Meade, John Reynolds, Winfield Scott Hancock, David Birney, Alfred Pleasonton and David Gregg, Governor Andrew Curtin, and President Lincoln flank each of the arches. A staircase carries visitors to the roof of the monument, which enjoys a panoramic view of the battlefield. Topping the dome is the figure of Winged Victory by sculptor Samuel Murray. CEREMONIES OF THE DEDICATION OF THE PENNSYLVANIA MEMORIAL Gettysburg, September 27, 1910 https://books.google.com/books?id=NudMAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA31&lpg=PA31#v=onepage&q&f=false MONUMENT TEXT THE COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA IN HONOR OF HER SONS WHO ON THIS FIELD FOUGHT FOR THE PRESERVATION OF THE UNION JULY 1, 2, & 3, 1863 PENNSYLVANIA AT GETTYSBURG 69 REGIMENTS OF INFANTRY 9 REGIMENTS OF CAVALRY 7 BATTERIES OF ARTILLERY TOTAL PRESENT 34,530 KILLED AND MORTALLY WOUNDED 1182 WOUNDED 3137 - - MISSING 860 ADDITIONAL PHOTOS Cottrell & Murray's plaster model, circa 1909. Pennsylvania Monument under construction, c.1910 Gettysburg Times Photo Victory & Peace Statue, ©Michael Kendra Pres. Abraham Lincoln, ©Michael Kendra Gov. Andrew Curtin, ©Michael Kendra Gen. George Meade, ©Michael Kendra Gen. John Reynolds, ©Michael Kendra Monument Restoration, ©Michael Kendra, May ‎4, ‎2002 Victory & Peace Statue, After Cleaning & Waxing NPS Photo Winter Sunrise, Jan 2019 NPS Photo RELATED LINKS https://www.gettysburgdaily.com/pennsylvania-state-monument-the-front-side/ https://www.gettysburgdaily.com/pennsylvania-state-monument-the-north-side/ https://www.gettysburgdaily.com/pennsylvania-state-monument-the-south-side/ https://www.gettysburgdaily.com/pennsylvania-state-monument-the-east-side/ https://www.gettysburgdaily.com/pennsylvania-state-monument-panorama-june-2010/ https://www.hmdb.org/m.asp?m=16509 http://gettysburg.stonesentinels.com/union-monuments/pennsylvania/state-of-pennsylvania/ The following information is provided for citations. Article Title: State of Pennsylvania Memorial Authors: ★ CivilWarTalk Website Name: CivilWarTalk.com URL: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/state-of-pennsylvania-memorial-gettysburg.165443/ Publisher: CivilWarTalk, LLC Original Published Date: June 1, 2021 Located at Gettysburg National Military Park, in Adams County, Pennsylvania (rev.6/1/21) National Monuments Eternal Light Peace Memorial ★ Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial ★ High Water Mark Lincoln Speech Memorial ★ Soldiers' National Monument U.S. State Monuments DE ★ IN ★ MD ★ NY ★ NY Auxiliary ★ PA ★ VT ★ U.S. Regulars C.S. State Monuments AL ★ AR ★ DE ★ FL ★ GA ★ LA ★ MD ★ MS ★ NC ★ SC ★ TN ★ TX ★ VA Union Regimentals CT ★ DE ★ IL ★ IN ★ ME ★ MD ★ MA ★ MI ★ MN NH ★ NJ ★ NY ★ OH ★ PA ★ RI ★ VT ★ WV ★ WI ★ U.S. Regulars
Cashtown Inn © Michael Kendra, April 18, 2009 :CSA1stNat: Located along the old Lincoln Highway or Chambersburg Pike in the town of Cashtown several miles west of Gettysburg, the brick Cashtown Inn served as a meeting place for Generals Robert E. Lee and A. P. Hill on July 1, 1863. LANDMARK PROFILE Also Known As: Jacob Mickley's Inn (Civil War Era) Battlefield: Gettysburg National Military Park, Pennsylvania (8 miles west of the town of Gettysburg) Location: 1325 Old Route 30, Cashtown, Pennsylvania Originally Chambersburg Turnpike Part of "Lincoln Highway" Current Owners: Privately Owned by Jack and Maria Paladino Map Coordinates: +39° 53' 4.68", -77° 21' 37.73" / 39.884702830741574, -77.3603809433523 Structure Used In 1863 As: Campaign Headquarters of Confederate Generals A. P. Hill, John D. Imboden, and Henry Heth Field Hospital for battlefield wounded. Admission: Operating as a Restaurant, Bed & Breakfast LANDMARK DETAILS Opened As: A Stable and an Inn, was open at this site as early as 1797 as a stage coach stop along the Gettysburg to Chambersburg turnpike Structure Built: between 1813 and 1815 Inn Owners/Keepers: (Dates are close approximations in some cases) 1797-1854: Peter Marck 1854-1864: Jacob Mickley 1864-1890: Daniel & Mary Heintzelman 1891-1986: History incomplete, but during this period... From 1913-1924, the Old Inn was used as a Civic League Library run by Emma J. Schwartz, with Elizabeth Diehl as the President of the league, including 34 registered members in 1913, with about 450 books available to borrow. One owner considered turning building into single occupant apartments, before the Inn was sold and restored. 1987-1996: Charles & Carol Buckley 1996-2005: Dennis & Elaine Hoover 2006-Current: Jack & Maria Paladino Occupant at the Time of Battle: Innkeeper Jacob Mickley Remarks: "...More Confederate soldiers likely passed through the front door of the Cashtown Inn, than any other building north of Richmond.” LANDMARK HISTORY At this site an Inn was built in 1797 and got its name from Peter Marck, the first innkeeper, who would only accept cash. The crossroads it sat near would eventually bear the same name, Cashtown. Peter Mark probably constructed the brick building known as the Cashtown Inn between 1804 and 1806. In 1813, a new road was built between Chambersburg and Gettysburg, and the enterprising Mark applied for a tavern license in 1815 and originally had four rooms available. He operated a tavern here for the next three decades. Henry Mickley bought the building in 1854, and his son Jacob Mickley ran the establishment during the Civil War. During the Gettysburg Campaign, the inn became the headquarters for many Confederate officers and staff, including Generals A. P. Hill, John D. Imboden, and Henry Heth. To an unwary observer who stood in front of Cashtown Inn on June 29 of that year, it must have looked as if the whole Rebel army had emerged from the rough, forested ridgeline when the van of Lt. Gen. A.P. Hill's Third Corps suddenly swung into view. Their crimson banners swayed with the liquid motion of marching soldiers, who were dressed in ragged butternut and gray. A gentle breeze carried with it the noise of rattling mess tins, the clanking of swords and bayonets, and the cheerful bantering of confident veterans on parade. To Cashtown Innkeeper Jacob Mickley, who witnessed the spectacle, it appeared as if “the entire force under Lee...passed within twenty feet of my barroom.” The basement also served as a field hospital during the battle, and it is said that so many amputations were performed, that the limbs piled up outside blocked any sunlight from coming in the cellar window. Henry Mickley sold the inn to Daniel and Mary Heintzelman in 1864, and they operated it until 1890. More than ninety years later, after passing through the hands of many owners, the Cashtown Inn was restored. Today, the historic tavern continues to serve travelers and visitors to south-central Pennsylvania. WAYSIDE MARKER TEXT After a stunning victory at Chancellorsville in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee led the Army of Northern Virginia through Maryland into Pennsylvania, marching east to threaten Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Washington, D.C. The Army of the Potomac marched north from the capital, searching for Lee. On July 1-3, the armies collided at Gettysburg in one of the pivotal battles of the Civil War. Three days later, after a bloody defeat, the Confederates began retracing their steps to Virginia. You are standing where Gen. Robert E. Lee and Gen. A.P. Hill stood on the morning of July 1, 1863, as they listened to the sounds of a growing battle in the distance, a few miles east, near Gettysburg. There, two Confederate infantry brigades clashed with two Union cavalry brigades and, because the armies were marching toward each other, the fighting intensified as additional troops arrived. Soon, the rest of Hill's corps hurried forward to join the fray. This was not the first time that Confederates had marched past the Cashtown Inn. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart had led his cavalrymen past this spot in October 1862 while on a raid. On this day, however, as tavernkeeper Jacob Mickley later wrote, "The entire rebel force under General Lee came down the Chambersburg Pike, passing within twenty feet of my bar room dore [sic]." With thousands of hungry and thirsty Confederates marching by, it is no wonder that Mickley lost by his own account at wagon, a horse, a steer, 50 chickens, 100 apple trees, and 480 gallons of whiskey and brandy - more than $2,000 in damages. Peter Mark probably constructed the brick building known as the Cashtown Inn between 1804 and 1806. In 1813, a new road was built between Chambersburg and Gettysburg, and the enterprising Mark applied for a tavern license in 1815. He operated a tavern here for the next three decades. Henry Mickley bought the building in 1854, and his son Jacob Mickley ran the establishment during the Civil War. He sold the inn to Daniel and Mary Heintzelman in 1864, and they operated it until 1890. More than ninety years later, after passing through the hands of many owners, the Cashtown Inn was restored. Today, the historic tavern continues to serve travelers and visitors to south-central Pennsylvania. Erected 2009 by Civil War Trails. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS Civic League Library Era, Tipton Photo Front of Building, © Michael Kendra, April 18, 2009 Wayside Marker, © Michael Kendra, April 18, 2009 ADDITIONAL READING Cashtown During the Gettysburg Campaign, 1863 by Suzanne Youngblood, Ten Roads Publishing, 2013. RELATED LINKS https://www.gettysburgdaily.com/adams-county-civil-war-taverns-part-4-gettysburg-lbg-john-winkleman/ https://gettysburg.stonesentinels.com/battlefield-farms/cashtown-inn/ Cashtown Inn Website: http://www.cashtowninn.com/ The following information is provided for citations. Article Title: Cashtown Inn (Near Gettysburg) Article Subject: Civil War Monuments, Structures, & Other Points of Interest Author: ★Mike Kendra, @CivilWarTalk Website Name: CivilWarTalk.com URL: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/cashtown-inn-near-gettysburg.185367/ Publisher: CivilWarTalk, LLC Original Published Date: June 1, 2021 Located at Gettysburg National Military Park, in Adams County, Pennsylvania (rev.6/1/21) National Monuments Eternal Light Peace Memorial ★ Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial ★ High Water Mark Lincoln Speech Memorial ★ Soldiers' National Monument U.S. State Monuments DE ★ IN ★ MD ★ NY ★ NY Auxiliary ★ PA ★ VT ★ U.S. Regulars C.S. State Monuments AL ★ AK ★ DE ★ FL ★ GA ★ LA ★ MD ★ MS ★ NC ★ SC ★ TN ★ TX ★ VA Union Regimentals CT ★ DE ★ IL ★ IN ★ ME ★ MD ★ MA ★ MI ★ MN NH ★ NJ ★ NY ★ OH ★ PA ★ RI ★ VT ★ WV ★ WI ★ U.S. Regulars Landmarks Points of Interest
State of Indiana Monument ©Michael Kendra, April 2002. :us34stars: MONUMENT PROFILE Battlefield: Gettysburg National Military Park, Pennsylvania Location: East Confederate and Slocum Aves, Spangler Meadow Map Coordinates: +39° 48' 50.76", -77° 12' 58.68" Men Engaged at Gettysburg from Indiana: 2,040 Gettysburg Casualties from Indiana: 550 or 27% MONUMENT DETAILS Sculptor: Al Yeager Fabricator: Codori Memorials Dedicated: July 1, 1971 Dimensions: Sculpture: H. 12 ft. 11 in. x W. 5 ft.; Base: W. 11 ft. x D. 6 ft. Description: Two Barre granite monoliths stand on a pedestal and base, surrounded by an Indiana limestone patio and walkway. The Indiana State Seal is incised into the lower front face, between the monoliths. Cost: $17,000.00 Remarks: The monument has a weight of 14 tons or 28,000 lbs. It was located in Spangler’s Meadow because of the action of the 27th Indiana Infantry Regiment on July 3, of 1863. MONUMENT TEXT Liberty - Equality Dedicated to those Hoosiers who so nobly advanced freedom on this great battlefield. On July 1, 1863, Indiana units engaged Confederate forces at Gettysburg and sustained some of the first casualties among the Union ranks. In this battle to preserve the Union, 552 men from Indiana were casualties to that cause In honored memory of those valiant men of Indiana who served in the: 7th Ind. Vol. Inf. Regt. 14th Ind. Vol. Inf. Regt. 19th Ind. Vol. Inf. Regt. 20th Ind. Vol. Inf. Regt. 27th Ind. Vol. Inf. Regt. I & K Companies 1st Ind. Vol. Cav. Regt. ABCDEF Companies 3rd Ind. Vol. Cav. Regt ADDITIONAL PHOTOS Assembling the Indiana state monument in Spangler's Meadow. October 30, 1970 RELATED LINKS http://gettysburg.stonesentinels.com/union-monuments/indiana/state-of-indiana/ https://www.gettysburgdaily.com/the-27th-indiana-and-spanglers-meadow/ The following information is provided for citations. Article Title: State of Indiana Monument Authors: ★ CivilWarTalk Website Name: CivilWarTalk.com URL: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/state-of-indiana-monument-gettysburg.165438/ Publisher: CivilWarTalk, LLC Original Published Date: June 1, 2021 Located at Gettysburg National Military Park, in Adams County, Pennsylvania (rev.6/1/21) National Monuments Eternal Light Peace Memorial ★ Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial ★ High Water Mark Lincoln Speech Memorial ★ Soldiers' National Monument U.S. State Monuments DE ★ IN ★ MD ★ NY ★ NY Auxiliary ★ PA ★ VT ★ U.S. Regulars C.S. State Monuments AL ★ AK ★ DE ★ FL ★ GA ★ LA ★ MD ★ MS ★ NC ★ SC ★ TN ★ TX ★ VA Union Regimentals CT ★ DE ★ IL ★ IN ★ ME ★ MD ★ MA ★ MI ★ MN NH ★ NJ ★ NY ★ OH ★ PA ★ RI ★ VT ★ WV ★ WI ★ U.S. Regulars
State of Georgia Monument ©Michael Kendra, taken between 1999 & 2005. :CSA1stNat: MONUMENT PROFILE Battlefield: Gettysburg National Military Park, Pennsylvania Location: Warfield Ridge, West Confederate Avenue, South of Millerstown Road Map Coordinates: +39° 47' 56.04", -77° 15' 21.60" Men Engaged at Gettysburg from Georgia: 13,080 Gettysburg Casualties from Georgia: 2,700 or 28% MONUMENT DETAILS Origin: Prior to Centennial of Civil War (1961), the Georgia legislature appropriated money to construct a memorial Sculptor: Harry Sellers Fabricator: Marietta Memorials Dedicated: September 21, 1961 Dimensions: Memorial: 15 feet, 6 inches by 7 feet, 7 inches by 7 feet, 7 inches Description: A shaft of polished Georgia blue granite, with Georgia State seal and commemorative text, set on two-tiered lower base, atop stone base. Cost: $7,500.00 in 1961 Additional Information: Georgia Installed Two Identical monuments at other battlefields during this era, including one at Antietam. MONUMENT TEXT GEORGIA CONFEDERATE - SOLDIERS - WE SLEEP HERE IN OBEDIENCE TO LAW. WHEN DUTY CALLED, WE CAME. WHEN COUNTRY CALLED, WE DIED. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS Dedication of the Georgia Monument. Mrs. Bach and Governor Vandiver laying wreaths. RELATED LINKS https://www.gettysburgdaily.com/georgia-monument/ http://gettysburg.stonesentinels.com/confederate-monuments/confederate-state-monuments/georgia/ The following information is provided for citations. Article Title: State of Georgia Monument Author: ★ CivilWarTalk Website Name: CivilWarTalk.com URL: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/state-of-georgia-monument-gettysburg.165302/ Publisher: CivilWarTalk, LLC Original Published Date: June 1, 2021 Located at Gettysburg National Military Park, in Adams County, Pennsylvania (rev.6/1/21) National Monuments Eternal Light Peace Memorial ★ Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial ★ High Water Mark Lincoln Speech Memorial ★ Soldiers' National Monument U.S. State Monuments DE ★ IN ★ MD ★ NY ★ NY Auxiliary ★ PA ★ VT ★ U.S. Regulars C.S. State Monuments AL ★ AR ★ DE ★ FL ★ GA ★ LA ★ MD ★ MS ★ NC ★ SC ★ TN ★ TX ★ VA Union Regimentals CT ★ DE ★ IL ★ IN ★ ME ★ MD ★ MA ★ MI ★ MN NH ★ NJ ★ NY ★ OH ★ PA ★ RI ★ VT ★ WV ★ WI ★ U.S. Regulars
© Michael Kendra, October 13, 2002In 1836 the master bridge builder John Weaver put the finishing touches on Lower Bridge, a beautifully proportioned, 192-foot-long stone bridge over Antietam Creek. Twenty-six years later the bridge became the battleground for the bloodiest day of fighting in the Civil War. On that pivotal day, September 17, 1862, nearly five thousand Americans lost their lives in the rolling hills and farmland near Sharpsburg in the Battle of Antietam. Ever since, the bridge has borne the name of General Ambrose P. Burnside, commander of the Union troops that stormed the bridge under withering Confederate fire. Burnside's Bridge is now under the care of the National Park Service, the three-arch bridge has been faithfully restored to its original condition, including the wooden coping that tops its walls. LANDMARK PROFILE Also Known As: Rohrersville Bridge Rohrbach's Bridge Lower Bridge (Military Name) Battlefield: Antietam National Battlefield, Sharpsburg, Maryland Location: Burnside Bridge Road, Sharpsburg, Maryland, previously known as: Sharpsburg-Rohrersville Road Sharpsburg and Maple Swamp Road Rohrbach Bridge Road Crosses: Antietam Creek Map Coordinates: +39° 27' 2.36", -77° 43' 54.97" Admission: Included with Entrance Fee to Antietam National Battlefield LANDMARK DETAILS Gardner, September 1862, LOC Built: Between 1833 and 1836 Type: Stone Masonry Arch Bridge - 192' long, 12' wide, made from local Limestone and Granite, Three Arched Construction: Made of a faced rubble masonry of local blue fieldstone. Three elliptical arch spans are supported by the abutments and two six-foot-wide piers rising from the stream bed. The central span is 35 1/2 feet between the piers and the spans on either side measure 30 feet each. The piers are rounded out beyond the spandrel and arch faces from the springline of the arches to their bases. This was done to ease floating debris past the piers. These are terminated with stone laid to form conical caps which meld with the spandrel faces. The voussoirs of the elliptical arches are of common height and keystones were not used. The width of the road bed is 13'4" and the ends are splayed outward to facilitate entrance at the sharp road angle. The parapets are about 3 1/2 feet high with wooden coping to shed rain into the stream. The present coping is a restoration, replacing concrete additions. Architect: John Weaver Cost to Build in 1836: $3,200.00, paid for by Washington County Commissioners Owner in 1863: Washington County, Maryland Current Owner: National Park Service (the U.S. accepted the title to the bridge on November 20, 1945) Bridge Rededicated: Friday, April 21, 2017 Burnside Bridge "Plan", Historic American Buildings Survey, Page 3 of 3 Surveyed 1986, Drawn by Donald Searle, Public Domain blueprint for the NPS LANDMARK HISTORY Located on the Antietam National Battlefield near Sharpsburg, Maryland, Burnside’s Bridge is an icon of the bloodiest one day battle in the American Civil War. Originally built to allow the movement of freight, animals, and people across the creek, with the intention of allowing farmers to take their produce and livestock to market in Sharpsburg, this bridge is one of 14 bridges built in that era over Antietam Creek in Washington County, Maryland. A County owned and constructed timber bridge was the predecessor of the bridge at this site. The bridge has two other names, one is "Rohrbach's Bridge", after a local farmer Henry Rohrbach who lived nearby. The second name, "Lower Bridge" is in reference to the Upper Bridge and Middle Bridge located further upstream. Crossing over Antietam Creek, the bridge played a key role in the September 17, 1862 Battle of Antietam (also known, especially in the South, as the Battle of Sharpsburg) during which 23,000 men died. The bridge proved to be a tactical resource to the Confederates during the course of the battle. U.S. General Ambrose E. Burnside, for whom the structure’s current name is derived, sustained heavy losses at the bridge while leading a corps of 12,000 men across Antietam Creek. When Burnside and his men attempted to cross the bridge on the morning of the battle, a group of about 500 soldiers from the 2nd and 20th Georgia regiments led under the command of Col. Henry C. Benning repelled the crossing. However, by early afternoon, the forces attempts to cross the bridge were finally successful. Once the Union army crossed the bridge, they were able to drive the Confederate troops back towards the town of Sharpsburg While Burnside’s choice to storm the bridge has been criticized, the geography of the area, especially the steep banks of Antietam Creek, its waist-deep water, and the pitted mountainside (the result of the excavation of limestone for the bridge) which afforded good cover for the Confederate riflemen, offered few alternatives. After multiple attacks were repulsed with great losses to the Union ranks, the Federal forces did seize the bridge but only after a strategically devastating delay. The bridge, which, prior to the Battle of Antietam, was known as the Lower Bridge, now bears the name of the General whose tactics and troops were destroyed there. After the war, the U.S. Government acquired the bridge and adjoining land. Monuments were at one time placed on the bridge's end parapets which had been squared off for this purpose. Beginning in 1955 and concluding in 1966, the National Park Service’s infrastructure improvement program known as Mission 66 brought several updates and repairs to the bridge. The improvements included the removal and relocation of some of the closely placed monuments. During the restoration of 1964-65 the parapets were also returned to their original condition. A nearby bypass road was constructed so that by 1966 vehicular traffic across the bridge could be stopped, and the original farm lanes were allowed to grow over with grass. Today, the old road bed is closed to all vehicles, but can still be discerned. Today, only foot traffic is allowed across Burnside's Bridge. It remains as one of the most photographed bridges of the Civil War. BRIDGE DAMAGE / REPAIR LOG 1933-1934: Immediate work was necessary in order to ensure that the bridge wouldn't become impassable due to the failure of the sidewalls, which were in danger of collapsing. Restoration would involve placing reinforcements over the arches, repointing all the stonework, rebuilding portions of the sidewalls, which had failed, and paving the roadway with bitumized macadam, which was similar to the surface of the roadway at the time. The estimated cost of repairs was $7,500. 1940: Repairs initiated which involved repointing the mortar, replacing the concrete coping with wood coping, removing the four monuments on the corners of the bridge, reconstructing the corners to their war-time appearance, and resetting the monuments on new bases 1941: On the east end of Burnside Bridge, nine feet of the bridge knocked down, and repairs initiated. 1947: On June 24, 1947, a contract signed with B.L. Smith of Boonsboro and the NPS for the repair of the bridge's arches, included the repointing of the mortar. During repairs, Smith noticed that the bridge shook when trucks went over it. In response to this warning from Smith, Superintendent Coleman recommended to the Superintendent of Washington County Schools that school busses should be rerouted so as to not put children in danger. The Maryland State Road Commission objected to permanently closing Burnside Bridge, so the Superintendent had a sign placed at each end of the bridge and at approach road intersections that stated that the bridge was unsafe for vehicles weighing more than three tons. 1953: Superintendent Doust stated that a section of the bridge had collapsed. B.L. Smith repaired the right wing and nearby bulging sections on Burnside Bridge. By March, the repair of the bridge was completed. Workers repair stone piers under bridge, portable dams can be seen holding water back in background (red). November 2015. NPS Photo. 1955: Recommendations for making the bridge safe for travel yet allowing it to retain its original appearance consisted of building cofferdams to strengthen the piers, removing the macadam from the road surface, and putting reinforced concrete over the arches, which included the removal of the old mortar and the application of a strong concrete mix. Dramatic repairs occur on the bridge to in order to insure the load carrying capacity. Stone work was repointed with plain Portland cement, which was not historically accurate. 1956: C. William Hetzer, Inc. of Hagerstown, MD began repairing and stabilizing the bridge in March 1956 1963-1965: Automobiles were prohibited from being driven over Burnside Bridge; Efforts by the National Park Service were made to restore the bridge to its 1862 appearance. The National Park Service restores Burnside Bridge by repointing the piers and arches, also resurfacing the drive; Part of Mission 66 Infrastructure Projects. 1974: Burnside Bridge underwent another restoration after the C&O Canal and Antietam National Battlefield separated into two parks. 1988-1989: Burnside Bridge underwent another rehabilitation from 1988 to 1989. The stone masonry piers were repaired, the stone masonry was cleaned and repointed, the roadway over the bridge and the approaches were resurfaced, and rip-rap was installed on the east bank of Antietam Creek, extending from the bridge to 130 feet north of the bridge. 2003: During Hurricane Isabel in September 2003, a large tree limb fell and landed on the parapet of the downstream side of the bridge: 2014: Repair work conducted on the bridge after a section of the stone bridge facing upstream collapsed. Along with the repairs to the stone wall, the central-span bulge on the upstream wall was repointed, and the wood coping was reconstructed. 2015-2017: Restoration after Flood Damage; Bridge closed for major repairs to the historic structure to ensure the long term structural stability, completed in two phases. Phase 1 - focused on in-stream work to strengthen the stone piers and arches. Portable dams were installed in the creek to divert the water during this phase. Phase II included repairs that required selectively dismantling and rebuilding sections of the bridge walls, project took 15 months to complete, final cost: $2,200,000.00 ADDITIONAL PHOTOS Burnside Bridge, Witness Tree at center. Alexander Gardner, September 1862, LOC. View from west, Alexander Gardner September 1862, NPS. Alexander Gardner September 1862, NPS. Alexander Gardner September 1862, NPS. Alexander Gardner September 1862, NPS. Burnside Bridge, Historic American Buildings Survey Location & Topography, NPS Survey, 1986, LOC Burnside Bridge, Historic American Buildings Survey Site Plan, NPS Survey, 1986, LOC Burnside Bridge, Historic American Buildings Survey Bridge Plan, NPS Survey, 1986, LOC Flooding conditions at Antietam's Burnside Bridge in 1996. NPS Photo View from Western Shore ©Michael Kendra, May 5, 2012 Looking East ©Michael Kendra, May 5, 2012 Freeze/Thaw Damage January 17, 2014, NPS Photo Repair work begins on the stone piers, as water is pumped away from the portadam. March 2016, NPS Photo ADDITIONAL READING Burnside's Bridge: Antietam by John Cannan, 2001. If you see a book written by Dr. Phillip Thomas Tucker, Ph D. about Burnside's Bridge, just look for a better book! RELATED LINKS NPS Page: https://www.nps.gov/places/antietam-battlefield-burnside-bridge.htm NPS Classified Structures: http://www.hscl.cr.nps.gov/insidenps/report.asp?STATE=MD&PARK=ANTI&RECORDNO=100 https://irma.nps.gov/DataStore/DownloadFile/560432 Workers work late into the night. repairing stonework by floodlight. November 2015. NPS Photo. The following information is provided for citations. Article Title: Burnside's Bridge (Antietam) Author: ★ Mike Kendra @CivilWarTalk Website Name: CivilWarTalk.com Publisher: CivilWarTalk, LLC URL: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/burnsides-bridge-antietam.184070/ Original_Published_Date: April 7, 2021 Full Citation: CivilWarTalk, "Monuments, Structures, and Other Points of Interest: Burnside's Bridge (Antietam)" CivilWarTalk.com, accessed , https://civilwartalk.com/threads/burnsides-bridge-antietam.184070/
State of Louisiana Monument :CSA1stNat: ©Michael Kendra, April of 2002. MONUMENT PROFILE Battlefield: Gettysburg National Military Park, Pennsylvania Location: West Confederate Avenue across from Pitzer's Woods Map Coordinates: +39° 48' 10.80", -77° 15' 20.88" Men Engaged at Gettysburg from Louisiana: 3,030 Gettysburg Casualties from Louisiana: 725 or 24% MONUMENT DETAILS Origin: Louisiana Division of the Daughters of the Confederacy in 1966 Artist: De Lue, Donald Bronze Casting: Completed in Italy Dedicated: June 11, 1971 Dimensions: Overall: H. 22 ft. Female figure: H. 10 ft. 6 in. Recumbant male figure: L. 9 ft. Base: 3 ft. x 9 ft. 10 in. x 9 ft. 10 in. Cost: $100,000 Description: A bronze sculpture of a female figure representing Peace and Memory, floats above a recumbent male artilleryman, with the Confederate battle flag clutched to his heart. A dove of peace is nestled in the reeds beneath the woman. She blows a trumpet over his dead body, and her proper right arm is outstretched above her head, held aloft is the flaming cannonball symbolic of ordnance and artillery. The sculpture is mounted on a polished green granite base. Remarks: The monument, entitled "Spirit Triumphant," was created by Donald DeLue, who was also the sculptor of the Mississippi monument. It represents a wounded gunner of New Orleans Washington Artillery clutching to his heart a Confederate battle flag while above the Spirit of the Confederacy raises a flaming cannonball. Some believe the figure represents Saint Barbara, the patron-saint of artillerymen. She is holding a flaming cannon ball in her right hand. St. Barbara lived in Asia Minor around 300 A.D. After she was converted to Christianity, her wealthy father had her condemned to death by beheading. After returning from the execution, the father was said to be struck by a lightning bolt which incinerated his body. Because of his fate, Barbara came to be known as the patron to be called upon to protect one in a storm. With the invention of gunpowder, and frequent accidental explosions because of its use, Saint Barbara also became known as the patron-saint of artillery. MONUMENT TEXT LOUISIANA STATE MEMORIAL THIS MEMORIAL WAS ERECTED BY THE STATE OF LOUISIANA TO HONOR HER SONS WHO FOUGHT AND DIED AT GETTYSBURG JULY 1-2-3, 1863. IN PARTICULAR IT MEMORIALIZES THE 2300 INFANTRYMEN OF HAYS AND NICHOLL'S LOUISIANA BRIGADES, THE CANNONEERS IN THE WASHINGTON ARTILLERY OF NEW ORLEANS, AND THOSE IN THE LOUISIANA GUARD, MADISON, AND DONALDSONVILLE ARTILLERY BATTERIES. THIS MEMORIAL IS PRESENTED TO THE GETTYSBURG NATIONAL MILITARY PARK BY THE STATE OF LOUISIANA UNDER THE ADMINISTRATION OF THE HONORABLE JOHN J. MCKEITHEN, GOVERNOR STATE OF LOUISIANA, HONORABLE LAMAR GIBSON, DIRECTOR LOUISIANA STATE PARKS AND RECREATION COMMISSION AND THE GETTYSBURG MEMORIAL COMMISSION (List of Commission Members) ADDITIONAL PHOTOS A Newspaper Clipping from Page 17 of The Town Talk Sunday, May 23, 1971 - Alexandria, Louisiana RELATED LINKS https://www.hmdb.org/Marker.asp?Marker=12220 https://www.gettysburgdaily.com/louisiana-monument/ https://www.gettysburgdaily.com/louisiana-state-monument/ http://gettysburg.stonesentinels.com/confederate-monuments/confederate-state-monuments/louisiana/ https://siris-artinventories.si.edu/ipac20/ipac.jsp?session=Q57409716U7I4.3635&profile=ariall&uri=full=3100001~!343301~!0&ri=3&menu=search&source=~!siartinventories https://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WMED4N_Louisiana_State_Monument_Gettysburg_PA The following information is provided for citations. Article Title: State of Louisiana Monument (Gettysburg) Article Subject: Civil War Monuments, Structures, & Other Points of Interest Author: ★Mike Kendra, @CivilWarTalk Website Name: CivilWarTalk.com URL: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/state-of-louisiana-monument-gettysburg.165317/ Publisher: CivilWarTalk, LLC Original Published Date: June 25, 2020 Located at Gettysburg National Military Park, in Adams County, Pennsylvania (rev.6/1/21) National Monuments Eternal Light Peace Memorial ★ Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial ★ High Water Mark Lincoln Speech Memorial ★ Soldiers' National Monument U.S. State Monuments DE ★ IN ★ MD ★ NY ★ NY Auxiliary ★ PA ★ VT ★ U.S. Regulars C.S. State Monuments AL ★ AR ★ DE ★ FL ★ GA ★ LA ★ MD ★ MS ★ NC ★ SC ★ TN ★ TX ★ VA Union Regimentals CT ★ DE ★ IL ★ IN ★ ME ★ MD ★ MA ★ MI ★ MN NH ★ NJ ★ NY ★ OH ★ PA ★ RI ★ VT ★ WV ★ WI ★ U.S. Regulars
1st New Jersey Light Artillery, Battery B Monument :us34stars: Gettysburg NMP, PA, by Mike Kendra, Taken between 1999 & 2005. MONUMENT PROFILE Unit Represented: 1st New Jersey Light Artillery Battery B Battlefield: Gettysburg National Military Park, Pennsylvania Location: Sickles Avenue Map Coordinates: +39° 48' 4.78", -77° 14' 49.88" Part of: III Corps, Artillery Brigade Commanded by: Capt. A.J. Clark, Lt. Robert Simms Equipped with: Six 10 pdr. Parrott Rifles Men Engaged at Gettysburg: 143 Gettysburg Casualties: Killed 1, Wounded 16, Missing 3; Total 20 MONUMENT TEXT FRONT: "Clark's Battery, Battery B, 1st New Jersey Light Artillery, 3d Corps. Fought here from 2 until 7 o'clock on July 2, 1863, firing 1,300 rounds of ammunition. Losses, killed 1, wounded 16, missing 3. Erected by the State of New Jersey 1888." BACK: "Mustered in Sept. 3, 1861, mustered out June 6, 1865. Engaged in 26 battles including all the important actions on the Peninsula, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Appomattox." MONUMENT DETAILS Artist: Frederick & Field Dedicated: July 2, 1888 (June 30, 1888) Dimensions: Overall: 14 ft. x 5 ft. 2 in. x 5 ft. 2 in. Description: Granite monument with sculpted reliefs of napoleon tubes and sponge and rammers. The granite monument has a tapered top decorated with stars and is topped by a granite ball. Remarks: The monument is a massive structure of dark Quincy granite and highly polished. The base is six feet three inches long and five feet three inches wide; its height is twelve feet six inches; its weight thirteen tons. The die is four feet long and three feet wide. On each end is carved a representation of a cannon and two rammers. The finial has on neck, front and rear Third Corps badge and a band of thirteen stars and terminates with cap on which an enlarged representation of a cannon ball which is cut solid on the stone. - from History of Battery B, First New Jersey Artillery by Michael Hanifen. LOCATION MAP VIEW MONUMENT MAP MONUMENT DEDICATION "This monument was erected by the State of New Jersey, under the acts of it's Legislature providing for the erection of suitable monuments to mark the positions occupied by New Jersey regiments and batteries upon the battlefields of Gettysburg, to commemorate their services in granite...." "... It was dedicated July 2, 1888. The picture is a faithful representation of (the) monument, and group of surviving comrades present at its dedication. It is located on Sickles Avenue, north of the wheatfield, and near the east line of Sherfy's Peach Orchard." Members in monument photo from left to right: C.H. Harrison, Cornelius Bush, Mrs. J.H. George, Mrs. Chas Bush, J. Whitmore, Jos. Stevenson, M. Whitmore, Thos. McKecknie, A. Parkhurst, E. Raake, G.H. Williams, J. Hardham, R. Wilson, Chas. Bush, M. Donohoe, J.H. George, Chas Banks, Capt. A.J. Clark, Geo. Smith, E.H. Timm, H. Roydhouse, J. Higgins, S.D. Farrand, O.N. Woodruff, Wm. Smith, Samuel Ennis, M. Hanifen. Photo & Text from: HISTORY OF BATTERY B, 1ST N.J. ARTILLERY, by Michael Hanifen, Pages 92 and 93, Longstreet House, Originally printed, Ottawa, Illinois, 1905, Reprinted, Hightstown, NJ, 1991. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS Likely taken during the 50th Anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg, July 2nd, 1913. Copyright Michael Kendra, January 19, 2002 Copyright Michael Kendra, April 18, 2009 Copyright Michael Kendra, August 25, 2012 Members of the N-SSA Team Representing 1st NJ Lt. Artillery, Taken in 1963. The following information is provided for citations. Article Title: 1st New Jersey Light Artillery, Battery B Monument (Gettysburg) Article Subject: Civil War Monuments, Structures, & Other Points of Interest Author: ★Mike Kendra, @CivilWarTalk Website Name: CivilWarTalk.com URL: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/1st-new-jersey-light-artillery-battery-b-monument-gettysburg.164985/ Publisher: CivilWarTalk, LLC Original Published Date: June 24, 2020 Located at Gettysburg National Military Park, in Adams County, Pennsylvania National Monuments Eternal Light Peace Memorial ★ Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial ★ High Water Mark ★ Lincoln Speech Memorial ★ Soldiers' National Monument U.S. State Monuments Delaware ★ Indiana ★ Maryland ★ New York ★ NY Auxiliary ★ Pennsylvania ★ Vermont ★ U.S. Regulars C.S. State Monuments Alabama ★ Arkansas ★ Delaware ★ Florida ★ Georgia ★ Louisiana ★ Maryland ★ Mississippi ★ North Carolina ★ South Carolina ★ Tennessee ★ Texas ★ Virginia Monument Categories National & State Monuments ★ Individual Monuments ★ Confederate Monuments ★ Landmarks Union Regimental Monuments and Markers: CT ★ DE ★ IL ★ IN ★ ME ★ MD ★ MA ★ MI ★ MN ★ NH ★ NJ ★ NY ★ OH ★ PA ★ RI ★ VT ★ WV ★ WI ★ U.S. Regulars
:CSA1stNat: Monument Ave, Richmond, VA ©Michael Kendra, 2015. MONUMENT PROFILE Battlefield: City of Richmond, Virginia Location: Monument Avenue and Lombardy Street intersection at Stuart Circle Map Coordinates: 37° 33.148′ N, 77° 27.474′ W Added to National Register of Historic Places: January 17, 1991, #90002098 MONUMENT DETAILS Origin: Stuart Monumental Association, formed April 1866 Later in 1892, known as the Veteran Cavalry Association of the Army of Northern Virginia Artist: Frederick Moynihan of New York Cost: $30,000.00 in 1907 Dedicated: May 30, 1907 Restoration: Completed in 2006 at a cost of about $35,000 Organized by a campaign by the Stuart-Mosby Historic Society Dimensions: Equestrian bronze statue- h. 15 ft.; Granite pedestal- h. 7½ ft. Description: Stuart is turned in the saddle facing east while the horse faces north with it's right front foot is raised. Remarks: The Monument was unveiled by 8-year-old Virginia Stuart Waller, the General’s granddaughter. Sculpture Removed from Base: July 7, 2020 at 10:44 am by emergency order of Richmond Mayor Levar Stoney citing a "severe, immediate and growing threat to public safety" and taken to an undisclosed location in unknown condition. MONUMENT TEXT MAJ:GEN:J.E.B. STUART COMMANDING CAVALRY CORPS ARMY NORTHERN VIRGINIA CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA *** THIS STATUE ERECTED BY HIS COMRADES AND THE CITY OF RICHMOND A.D. 1906 BORN IN PATRICK COUNTY, VA. FEB 6 1833 DIED IN RICHMOND, VA. MAY 12 1864 AGED 31 YEARS --- MORTALLY WOUNDED IN THE BATTLE OF YELLOW TAVERN MAY 11, 1864 --- HE GAVE HIS LIFE FOR HIS COUNTRY AND SAVED THIS CITY FROM CAPTURE. “TELL GEN. STUART TO ACT ON HIS OWN JUDGEMENT AND DO WHAT HE THINKS BEST, I HAVE IMPLICIT CONFIDENCE IN HIM” --- GEN. T. J. ‘STONEWALL’ JACKSON IN TURNING OVER THE COMMAND OF HIS TROOPS TO GEN. STUART AFTER BEING WOUNDED AT CHANCELLORSVILLE, MAY 3, 1863 “HIS GRATEFUL COUNTRYMEN WILL MOURN HIS LOSS AND CHERISH HIS MEMORY. TO HIS COMRADES IN ARMS HE HAS LEFT THE PROUD RECOLLECTION OF HIS DEEDS AND THE INSPIRING INFLUENCE OF HIS EXAMPLE” --- GEN. R. E. LEE, ANNOUNCING THE DEATH OF GEN. STUART TO HIS ARMY - MAY 20, 1864. LOCATION MAP VIEW MONUMENT MAP MONUMENT DEDICATION “In the presence of a great multitude of people, and beneath cloudless skies, with the thunder of cannon, the waving of flags, the singing of children and the playing of bands, the equestrian statue of Major-General J. E. B. Stuart was unveiled yesterday by a granddaughter of the world-famous cavalry leader. . .The exercises of the monument were preceded by one of the most notable parades ever seen in Richmond, in which nearly 10,000 men participated, the column taking over an hour to pass a given point.” -- The Times Dispatch, May 31, 1907 On hand for the dedication was: Mrs. Flora Stuart and Mrs. Anna Jackson. A Dedication Address for the J.E.B. Stuart Monument was given by Judge Theodore S. Garnett. A MONUMENTAL CONTROVERSEY 1907 Was the J.E.B. Stuart Monument a Cheap Imitation? A furor arose over the design of the J.E.B. Stuart Equestrian Sculpture in 1907, because it appears that it's almost a direct copy of the statue of Sir James Outram, by John Henry Foley created in 1861 and on display in Kolkata, India. Some accused artist Frederick Moynihan of making an exact copy of the Outram Statue and just adding a hat, a cape, and a beard! -Portrait of the Outram Statue by Roffe, 1875. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS Photo from the Monument Dedication, taken May 30. -Photo from The Times Dispatch, Published on May 31, 1907 -LOC Photo, taken between 1906 and 1910. https://www.hmdb.org/marker.asp?marker=9150 http://www.virginiaplaces.org/vacities/monavestuart.html https://books.google.com/books/about/J_E_B_Stuart_major_general_commander_of.html?id=W7MVAQAAMAAJ https://books.google.com/books?id=OmArAQAAMAAJ&lpg=PA245
Soldiers' National Monument Farragutful, Sept 2017 :us34stars: MONUMENT PROFILE Battlefield: Gettysburg National Military Park, Pennsylvania Location: Soldiers' National Cemetery Map Coordinates: +39° 49' 11.28", -77° 13' 52.32" MONUMENT DETAILS Artists: Sculptor: Randolph Rogers Designer: James Goodwin Batterson Designer: George W. Keller Cornerstone Laid: July 4, 1865 Dedicated: July 1, 1869 Dimensions: Sculpture: H. 60 ft. Base: W. 25 ft. x D. 25 ft. Description: The design of the monument, as executed by Mr. J. G. Batterson, of Hartford, Connecticut, is intended to be purely historical, telling its own story with such simplicity that any discerning mind will readily comprehend its meaning and purpose. The superstructure is sixty feet high, and consists of a massive pedestal, twenty-five feet square at the base, and is crowned with a colossal statue representing the Genius of Liberty. Standing upon a three-quarter globe, she raises with her right hand the victor's wreath of laurel, while with her left she gathers up the folds of our national flag under which the victory has been won. Projecting from the angles of the pedestal are four buttresses, supporting an equal number of allegorical statues representing, respectively, War, History, Peace, and Plenty. War is personified by a statue of the American soldier, who, resting from the conflict, relates to History the story of the battle which this monument is intended to commemorate. History, in listening attitude, records with stylus and tablet the achievements of the field and the names of the honored dead. Peace is symbolized by a statue of the American mechanic, characterized by appropriate accessories. Plenty is represented by a female figure, with a sheaf of wheat and fruits of the earth, typifying peace and abundance as the soldier's crowning triumph. The main die of the pedestal is octagonal in form, panelled upon each face. The cornice and plinth above are also octagonal, and are heavily moulded. Upon this plinth rests an octagonal moulded base bearing upon the face, in high relief, the national arms. The upper die and cap are circular in form, the die being encircled by stars equal in number with the States whose sons contributed their lives as the price of the victory won at Gettysburg. Cost: $50,000.00 for the Statue, in addition: to prepare the cemetery grounds, and complete reinternment of the dead around it, complete with headstones, fencing, and stone walls, and a lodge for the "porter": about $80,000.00, or a bit over $130,000.00 total. (without counting the cost of the Reynolds Statue, also purchased and installed at the same time.) MONUMENT TEXT GETTYSBURG JULY 1, 2, 3, 1863 ------ IT IS RATHER FOR US TO BE HERE DEDICATED TO THE GREAT TASK REMAINING BEFORE US- THAT FROM THESE HONORED DEAD WE TAKE INCREASED DEVOTION TO THAT CAUSE FOR WHICH THEY GAVE THE LAST FULL MEASURE OF DEVOTION- THAT WE HERE HIGHLY RESOLVE THAT THESE DEAD SHALL NOT HAVE DIED IN VAIN—THAT THIS NATION, UNDER GOD, SHALL HAVE A NEW BIRTH OF FREEDOM—AND THAT GOVERNMENT OF THE PEOPLE, BY THE PEOPLE, FOR THE PEOPLE, SHALL NOT PERISH FROM THE EARTH. - LINCOLN, - - - - - - - - - - - NOVEMBER 19, 1863 ADDITIONAL PHOTOS Photo of Assembly of the Soldiers' National Monument With Block & Tackle Frame & Scaffolding Tipton Photo, Circa June 1869, -Gettysburg National Military Park / NPS Photo. - - - - - View of the Soldiers' National Monument circa 1903 taken by the Detroit Photographic Company, -LOC Photo Genius of Liberty Statue, ©Michael Kendra, April 2002 Statue of War, ©Michael Kendra, April 2002 Statue of History, ©Michael Kendra, April 2002 Statue of Peace, ©Michael Kendra, April 2002 Statue of Plenty, ©Michael Kendra, April 2002 ©Michael Kendra, April 2002 RELATED LINKS https://www.gettysburgdaily.com/soldiers-national-monument-in-need-of-repairs/ http://gettysburg.stonesentinels.com/other-monuments/soldiers-national-monument/ https://www.gettysburgdaily.com/dedication-day-setup-soldiers-national-cemetery/ https://www.hmdb.org/Marker.asp?Marker=64853 https://books.google.com/books?id=QAgTAAAAYAAJ https://www.nps.gov/hdp/exhibits/gettysburg_monument.htm?fbclid=IwAR1cWj5AzPnGZbGfw_oCtDABEw77t4H-RYRezxq4Oe77YOmeuorPjAhCeXQ The following information is provided for citations. Article Title: Soldiers' National Monument (Gettysburg) Article Subject: Civil War Monuments, Structures, & Other Points of Interest Author: ★Mike Kendra, @CivilWarTalk Website Name: CivilWarTalk.com URL: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/soldiers-national-monument-gettysburg.165537/ Publisher: CivilWarTalk, LLC Original Published Date: November 21, 2019 Located at Gettysburg National Military Park, in Adams County, Pennsylvania (rev.6/1/21) National Monuments Eternal Light Peace Memorial ★ Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial ★ High Water Mark Lincoln Speech Memorial ★ Soldiers' National Monument U.S. State Monuments DE ★ IN ★ MD ★ NY ★ NY Auxiliary ★ PA ★ VT ★ U.S. Regulars C.S. State Monuments AL ★ AR ★ DE ★ FL ★ GA ★ LA ★ MD ★ MS ★ NC ★ SC ★ TN ★ TX ★ VA Union Regimentals CT ★ DE ★ IL ★ IN ★ ME ★ MD ★ MA ★ MI ★ MN NH ★ NJ ★ NY ★ OH ★ PA ★ RI ★ VT ★ WV ★ WI ★ U.S. Regulars
State of Virginia Monument :CSA1stNat: Photo ©Michael Kendra, about 2002. MONUMENT PROFILE Also Known As: Robert E. Lee Monument Battlefield: Gettysburg National Military Park, Pennsylvania Location: Seminary Ridge east of West Confederate Avenue Map Coordinates: +39° 48' 50.76", -77° 15' 1.08" Men Engaged at Gettysburg from Virginia: 19,030 Gettysburg Casualties from Virginia: 4,470 or 25% MONUMENT DETAILS Artist: Sculptor: Frederick William Sievers Founder: Tiffany and Company Fabricator: Van Amringe Granite Company Commissioned: March 9, 1908 Dedicated: June 8, 1917 Dimensions: Total Height: 42 ft. Sculpture: H. 14 ft. Pedestal: H. 28 ft. Cost: $50,000.00 (June 1917) Description: A three-stepped Mt. Airy granite base supports a pedestal on which a bronze statue of General Robert E. Lee astride his favorite horse, Traveller stands. General Lee holds the horse's reins in his proper left hand and holds his hat in his proper right hand. Below Lee as he studies the distant Union lines are a bronze group of seven Confederate soldiers. In this group, the central figure is an equestrian soldier holding the flag of the Commonwealth of Virginia. To the left of him are two soldiers with rifles standing guard, and one soldier aiming a pistol. To the right of him is a soldier swinging a bayonet, a soldier about to aim his rifle, and a soldier blowing a bugle. According to the marker at the base of the monument, "The group represents various types who left civil occupations to join the Confederate Army. Left to right; a professional man, a mechanic, an artist, a boy, a business man, a farmer, a youth." Remarks: The Virginia monument was the first of the Confederate State monuments at Gettysburg. It was unveiled by Miss Virginia Carter, a niece of Robert E. Lee. It is also the largest of the Confederate monuments, a fitting tribute for the state that provided the largest contingent to the Army of Northern Virginia, its commander, and its name. Lee's figure, topping the monument astride his favorite horse, Traveller, was created by sculptor Frederick Sievers from photographs and life masks of the general. He even went to Lexington, Virginia to study Traveller's skeleton, preserved at Washington and Lee University. MONUMENT TEXT VIRGINIA TO HER SONS AT GETTYSBURG FEATURED VIDEO TOUR ADDITIONAL PHOTOS Construction of Virginia Monument, Tipton 1910. Monument Dedication Day, June 8, 1917. Statue of Robert E. Lee, ©Michael Kendra Lower Grouping of Statues, ©Michael Kendra Winter Snowfall Jan. 2002, ©Michael Kendra Morning Sun on Snowy Monument, Jan. 2002, ©Michael Kendra NPS Photo. NPS Photo. Lower Group Detail Dec 2019 ©Michael Kendra RELATED LINKS https://www.gettysburgdaily.com/sunday-morning-at-the-virginia-state-monument/ https://www.gettysburgdaily.com/the-virginia-state-monument-latest-red-cloth-recipient/ The following information is provided for citations. Article Title: State of Virginia Monument (Gettysburg) Article Subject: Civil War Monuments, Structures, & Other Points of Interest Author: ★Mike Kendra, @CivilWarTalk Website Name: CivilWarTalk.com URL: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/state-of-virginia-monument-gettysburg.165439/ Publisher: CivilWarTalk, LLC Original Published Date: March 20, 2020 Located at Gettysburg National Military Park, in Adams County, Pennsylvania (rev.6/1/21) National Monuments Eternal Light Peace Memorial ★ Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial ★ High Water Mark Lincoln Speech Memorial ★ Soldiers' National Monument U.S. State Monuments DE ★ IN ★ MD ★ NY ★ NY Auxiliary ★ PA ★ VT ★ U.S. Regulars C.S. State Monuments AL ★ AR ★ DE ★ FL ★ GA ★ LA ★ MD ★ MS ★ NC ★ SC ★ TN ★ TX ★ VA Union Regimentals CT ★ DE ★ IL ★ IN ★ ME ★ MD ★ MA ★ MI ★ MN NH ★ NJ ★ NY ★ OH ★ PA ★ RI ★ VT ★ WV ★ WI ★ U.S. Regulars
Stonewall Jackson Monument - Monument Ave, Richmond, VA ©Michael Kendra, 2015. Battlefield: City of Richmond, Virginia Location: At the intersection of Monument Avenue and The Boulevard (now Arthur Ashe Boulevard) Map Coordinates: 37° 33' 37.90", -77° 28' 16.69" Part of: ANV MONUMENT DETAILS Artist: William F. Sievers Date Conceived: November 29, 1911 Planning & Fundraising: Rev. James Powers Smith as president of the The Jackson Monument Corporation. Jackson’s widow Mary Anna supported the fundraising. The UDC contributed to fundraising efforts. Cornerstone Laid: June 3, 1915 Dedicated: October 11, 1919 Cost: about $40,000.00 $10,000.00 appropriated by the State Legislature $10,000.00 by the City of Richmond $5,000 by the sale of Confederate Flags The remainder from individual contributions Dimensions: Sculpture: H. 17.5 ft.; Base: H. 20.5 ft. Sculpture Removed from Base: July 1, 2020 by emergency order of Richmond Mayor Levar Stoney citing a "severe, immediate and growing threat to public safety" and taken to an undisclosed location in unknown condition. STONEWALL JACKSON BORN 1824 DIED AT CHANCELORSVILLE 1863 Description: A great equestrian bronze figure of 17 feet in height on a 20 foot tall oval granite pedestal of General Jackson astride his horse. Oak leaves adorn the statue base and may be a reference to the characterizing of Jackson as stoic. There is an art deco (Greek styled) frieze lining the top of the base. The statue is oriented to the North in order to keep a watchful eye on the Union. The Dedication Ceremony: As this was shortly after World War I, this statue was sure to evoke the "brave young soldier", welcoming the return of another great generation of soldiers. The Jackson family was in attendance, as well as the State Governor, and even arrived on site in automobiles. The grandson of Robert E. Lee gave a speech, as well as Stonewall's granddaughter. When the time came to unveil the new statue the son of the sculptor pulled the ropes. a celebratory parade completed the dedication, including Virginia National Guard, VMI Cadets, and many gathered schoolchildren. LOCATION MAP VIEW MONUMENT MAP ADDITIONAL PHOTOS Detail of bronze equestrian, 2015, ©Michael Kendra -Confederate Veteran, Volume 28, February, 1920, No. 2 (Click on Page to Zoom In)
Lieutenant General James Longstreet Monument :CSA1stNat: Gettysburg NMP, ©Michael Kendra, 2003. Longstreet's most controversial service was at the Battle of Gettysburg in July 1863, where he openly disagreed with General Lee on the tactics to be employed and reluctantly supervised several unsuccessful attacks on Union forces, including the disastrous Pickett's Charge. MONUMENT PROFILE Battlefield: Gettysburg National Military Park, Pennsylvania Location: Pitzer's Woods off West Confederate Ave Map Coordinates: +39° 48' 20.52", -77° 15' 23.76" Leader of: 1st Corps, ANV MONUMENT DETAILS Artist: Casteel, Gary, sculptor NPS Site Approval: February 3, 1993 Sculpture Completed: September 1997 Dedicated: July 3, 1998 Dimensions: About 10' Tall, 1 1/2-tons Cost: $190,000.00 in 1998 Funding: Began in 1990. Provided by the General James Longstreet Memorial Fund, established by the North Carolina Division Sons of Confederate Veterans, using the slogan "It's About Time!" to raise funds. Description: Bronze portrait of General Longstreet in his military uniform astride his horse. Remarks: Nicknames that show how some feel about the look of the monument: “The Troll on the Pony” and “Gimli on his horse”. MONUMENT TEXT Lieutenant General James Longstreet Commanding First Corps Army of Northern Virginia ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ Soldiers of Gen. Longstreet's command held and protected the right wing of the army July 2-4 1863. His First Corps attacked and dislodged Union forces at the Devil's Den, the Wheatfield and the Peach Orchard, on July 2. As a portion of his infantry secured the Peach Orchard, Gen. Longstreet advanced on horseback with them. The following day, Gen. Longstreet was ordered by Gen. Robert E. Lee to coordinate an attack against the Union line on Cemetery Ridge. On July 3, "Longstreet's Assault" was repulsed with great loss after penetrating the enemy's battle line on Cemetery Ridge. During the march back to Virginia, Gen. Longstreet and his First Corps played a prominent role in protecting the retreating army. "By the soldiers he is invariably spoken of as 'the best fighter in the whole army.' " - Lt. Col. Arthur J. Fremantle, Her Majesty's Coldstream Guards (June 27, 1863) Lieutenant General James Longstreet Commanding First Corps Army of Northern Virginia January 8, 1821 - January 2, 1904 ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ Born in Edgefield District, S.C. Graduated from West Point 1842. Served as Lieutenant with the 8th U.S. Infantry in the Mexican War and brevetted major for gallantry, Battle of Molino del Rey. Resigned commission as a major, U.S. Army, May 1861. Appointed brigadier general, Confederate States Army, June 1861. Promoted to Major General, CSA, October 1861. Promoted Lieutenant general, CSA, October 1862. Gen Robert E. Lee's second in command and ranking lieutenant general in the Army of Northern Virginia. Gallantly led troops in battles at First Manassas, the Peninsula, Second Manassas, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, Chickamauga and Knoxville. Wounded at Battle of the Wilderness, May 1864. Returned to duty during the Union siege of Petersburg, and present with Gen. Lee at surrender of army at Appomattox. Buried at Alta Vista Cemetery, Gainesville, GA. "Ah! here is Longstreet, here's my 'Old War-Horse.'" Gen. Robert E. Lee (September 17, 1862) VIDEO TOUR LOCATION MAP VIEW MONUMENT MAP MONUMENT DEDICATION July 3, 1998 The newly installed statue was hidden from early viewing by a great square red-white-and-blue Confederate Battle Flag, 25 foot long on each side. The 2nd South Carolina String Band was on hand to play some period pre-ceremony tunes. The ceremony began at 10:00 am to a crowd of over 4,000 guests that included many local and state dignitaries, as well as several known descendants of James Longstreet. An invocation was given by Reverend Roy Fauth of Trinity United Church of Christ of Gettysburg. The Keynote Speaker was Dr. William Garret Piston of Southwest Missouri State University, he, being the man who setup the committee that is responsible for the creation of this memorial statue. Dr. John Latschar, Superintendent, Gettysburg National Military Park accepted an endowment check for the perpetual care of the monument, as well as accepting the monument itself, on behalf of the National Park Service, and the people of the United States. The final address was made by Gary Casteel who addressed the audience about sculpting the monument. For the unveiling, first, the information tablets were unveiled. Then when the time to unveil the statue came, William & Jamie Paterson and their grandson Shane were given the official honor. When Mrs. Paterson began pulling the Battle Flag off of the monument, the band began playing the song Bonnie Blue Flag, a favorite tune of James Longstreet. A great cheer arose from the crowd, and the great monument was revealed. After the unveiling, Bob Underwood, a Scottish bagpiper dressed in full uniform of the Highland Guard, played a medley of Scottish songs. To complete the event, Father Joseph Hildreth of St. Francis Xavier Church gave a benediction. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS The July, 1941 Model of the Longstreet Monument, created by sculptor Paul Manship at the direction of the Longstreet Memorial Association, and it's founder, the General's widow, Helen Dortch Longstreet Mary Pickford looks over her shoulder at the Longstreet equestrian concept during dedication ceremonies at the site on July 2, 1941. You can see the model below the enlarged photograph. Groundbreaking ceremony for the monument on the battlefield on July 2, 1941 with Hollywood celebrity Mary Pickford holding the shovel and Mrs. Longstreet in the striped dress, UCV Commander Julius F. Howell on the right, and NPS Dr. J. Walter Coleman at left. MYTHS AND OPINIONS ABOUT... The James Longstreet / Hero Sculpture Opinions written by Michael Kendra... -Only known photo of Longstreet on a horse, Gettysburg Reunion, July 1888. Look at this photo! How big is Longstreet? How big is the horse? Do you still think the monument is out of proportion? The Horse is Too Small / Longstreet is Too Large for the Horse This is a popular commentary among many on the internet. Unfortunately, the facts cannot be satisfactorily answered to everyone's agreement. Some say that the horse is proportioned more like a pony. The sculptor, Gary Casteel, is insistent that the horse is in fact very well proportioned as a "war horse" rather than a stallion as other monuments on the battlefield are portrayed. It is my opinion the horse and rider are actually well proportioned, but that the "moment frozen in time" showing the horse preparing to gallop off with great haste, perhaps frightened by a nearby explosion, as Longstreet pulls back the reigns to control the horse, and it gives the impression that the horse is smaller than it actually is. In my opinion, the horse is rearing down as if preparing to take off, and that from some angles, particularly when viewed in a photograph, the horse appears to be too small for the rider. However, there are reports that Casteel designed the the horse to be 4/5th scale compared to the Longstreet Rider, so that the rider would look better proportioned up on a pedestal. I would recommend visiting the monument in person, walk up to the memorial and see for yourself how large the horse actually is. Verdict: It's a matter of personal artistic interpretation. The Monument is Missing the Pedestal The monument was never designed with a pedestal in mind. As stated by the sculptor Gary Casteel, "The monument was erected without a pedestal to become not less heroic, but more personal and approachable by those who visit Lee's lieutenant." There have been many mythic commentaries on this issue, and many to this day believe that a pedestal will some day be built. I must personally take some of the blame, for I once perpetrated an April Fools joke exploiting this very myth. Link for April Fools 2010: Donation for Stone Base of Longstreet Monument I don't think there was ever an intent to demean the memory of Longstreet in the monument design, but rather, bring the man on his horse down to a human level, so you can make a personal connection with the art in it. That's what I take from it. Verdict: False, there have never been plans to build a pedestal. The Myth about the Raised Horse Hoof There is a common saying in and around Gettysburg about equestrian monuments, if all four horses hooves are on the ground, then the officer riding the horse survived the battle unharmed. If one hoof is raised, the officer was wounded, and if two are raised the officer was killed. Prior to the James Longstreet Memorial, this "rule of thumb" was happily applied at Gettysburg. However, one glance at the Longstreet Memorial may give you pause because one hoof is in fact raised, and it is a well known fact that Longstreet was not wounded at Gettysburg. One critic called it "an unnecessary violation of tradition". Another critic tried to explain it this way: "the raised hoof is symbolic of Longstreet's, and his men's wounding (figuratively) at Gettysburg". If you are going to fault the artist, Gary Casteel for this choice, then you better be prepared to also include artist Paul Manship in your argument. Manship designed the original model for the Longstreet monument in 1941 at the direction of Helen Dortch Longstreet, and that also included model horse with one hoof raised showing a forward movement while riding. Admittedly, there are reports that the "horse-statue code" has been rumored to be one of the reasons the original 1941 version was never constructed. The reality is that if there is a secret code to the original equestrian statues at Gettysburg, it's so secret, the original artists didn't share it with other artists after their time. Verdict: True, it does break an unofficial tradition, but this is artwork, and the Longstreet is a contemporary piece of artwork, it was never intended to match every other equestrian monument on the battlefield. ADDITIONAL READING Lee's Tarnished Lieutenant, by William Garrett Piston, 1988. Guide to Gettysburg Battlefield Monuments, by Tom Huntington, 2013. RELATED LINKS https://www.gettysburgdaily.com/longstreet-monument/ https://gettysburg.stonesentinels.com/monuments-to-individuals/james-longstreet/ https://www.baltimoresun.com/news/bs-xpm-1998-06-26-1998177002-story.html https://finding-aids.lib.unc.edu/05037/#folder_5#1 https://web.archive.org/web/20080723123356/http://www.elohi.com/photo/longstreet/ The following information is provided for citations. Article Title: Lieutenant General James Longstreet Monument (Gettysburg) Authors: ★ CivilWarTalk Website Name: CivilWarTalk.com URL: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/lieutenant-general-james-longstreet-monument-gettysburg.167292/ Publisher: CivilWarTalk, LLC Original Published Date: January 8, 2020 Located at Gettysburg National Military Park, in Adams County, Pennsylvania (rev.6/1/21) National Monuments Eternal Light Peace Memorial ★ Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial ★ High Water Mark Lincoln Speech Memorial ★ Soldiers' National Monument U.S. State Monuments DE ★ IN ★ MD ★ NY ★ NY Auxiliary ★ PA ★ VT ★ U.S. Regulars C.S. State Monuments AL ★ AR ★ DE ★ FL ★ GA ★ LA ★ MD ★ MS ★ NC ★ SC ★ TN ★ TX ★ VA Union Regimentals CT ★ DE ★ IL ★ IN ★ ME ★ MD ★ MA ★ MI ★ MN NH ★ NJ ★ NY ★ OH ★ PA ★ RI ★ VT ★ WV ★ WI ★ U.S. Regulars
State of New York Monument :us34stars: ©Michael Kendra, April 2002. MONUMENT PROFILE Battlefield: Gettysburg National Military Park, Pennsylvania Location: Northeast side of the National Cemetery Map Coordinates: +39° 49' 14.88", -77° 13' 50.16" Men Engaged at Gettysburg from New York: 23,050 Gettysburg Casualties from New York: 6,695 or 29% MONUMENT DETAILS Artists: Sculptor: Caspar Buberl Fabricator: Hallowell Granite Company Founder: Henry-Bonnard Bronze Company Dedicated: July 2, 1893 Dimensions: Total: H. 93 ft. Sculpture: H. 13 ft.; Base: 27 ft. 8 in. square. Cost: $59,095.30 (July 1893) Description: At the top of a Fox Island granite column stands an allegorical female figure representing the state of New York. She holds a staff in her proper left hand and a wreath in her proper right hand. The foot of the column is adorned with a bronze New York state seal and a bronze relief depicting New York generals at Gettysburg. Below the column is a block made of Hallowell granite adorned with bronze inscription plaques. Remarks: The monument depicts the state of New York holding a wreath to place over a grave. Although difficult to see from the ground, the face of the statue is weeping for the roughly 6,700 members of New York units who became casualties during the three days of Gettysburg. MONUMENT DEDICATION -LOC Photo by Detroit Publishing Co., Circa 1903. July 2, 1893 Program for exercises at the cemetery at 3 PM: Music Star Spangled Banner Hymn by Kennicot Quartette Prayer Rev. Dr. W. B. Derrick (Veteran Soldier) Introductory Remarks by President of the Board of Commissioners Gen. D. E. Sickles Dedication Address by the Rt. Rev. Bishop H. C. Potter Introduction of Governor Flower and Governor Pattison to Veterans Response by Governor Flower and Governor Pattison Poem by Mr. Dewitt C Sprague Hymn by Kennicot Quartette Patriotic Song by Kennicot Quartette Benediction by Bishop of Pennsylvania and Virginia Salute by U.S. Battery (Follow the Above Links to see the text of the program in Google Books) Newspaper Excerpts from the -Gettysburg Compiler Published July 4, 1893: .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MONUMENT TEXT TO THE OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK WHO FELL IN THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG, JULY 1, 2, 3, 1863, MANY OF WHOM ARE HERE BURIED, THIS MONUMENT IS ERECTED BY A GRATEFUL COMMONWEALTH. OFFICIAL RETURN OF CASUALTIES IN THE NEW YORK COMMANDS: KILLED:_____ 82 OFFICERS, ______912 ENLISTED MEN. WOUNDED:______ 306 OFFICERS, ____3763 ENLISTED MEN. CAPTURED OR MISSING:___ 68 OFFICERS,__ 1685 ENLISTED MEN. GROUPS OF OFFICERS PORTRAYED ON BRONZE RELIEFS; FRONT: MAJOR GENL. D. E. SICKLES ____OF N.Y. (WOUNDED) BRIG. GENL. J. B. CARR________OF N.Y. BRIG. GENL. J. H. H. WARD ____OF N.Y. BVT. MAJ. GENL. S.K. ZOOK ____OF N.Y. (KILLED) BRIG. GENL. R. B. AYERS_______OF N.Y. BRIG. GENL. S. H. WEED________OF N.Y. (KILLED) BVT. BRIG. GENL. H. E. TREMAIN OF N.Y. . . OBVERSE: MAJOR GENL. H.W. SLOCUM___OF N.Y. MAJ. GEN. A. PLEASONTON____OF D.C. BRIG. GENL. J.S. WADSWORTH OF N.Y. BRIG. GENL. G.S. GREENE_____OF N.Y. BRIG. GEN. H. J. HUNT________OF O. BRIG. GENL. J.J. BARTLETT____OF N.Y. BRIG. GENL. D.A. RUSSEL_____OF N.Y. BRIG. GENL. A. SHALER_______OF N.Y. COL. H.A. BARNUM___________OF N.Y. RIGHT: MAJ. GENL. J.F. REYNOLDS _____OF PA. (KILLED) MAJ. GENL. A. DOUBLEDAY _____OF N.Y. (WOUNDED) BRIG. GENL. A. VON STEINWEHR OF N.Y. BRIG. GENL. F.C. BARLOW ______OF N.Y. (WOUNDED) COL. F.C. DEVIN ______________OF N.Y. . . . . LEFT: MAJ. GENL. W.S. HANCOCK _OF PA. (WOUNDED) MAJ. GENL. D. BUTTERFIELD OF N.Y. (WOUNDED) MAJ. GENL. G. K. WARREN __OF N.Y. (WOUNDED) BRIG. GENL. J. KILPATRICK_ OF N.Y. BRIG. GENL. A.S. WEBB ____OF N.Y. (WOUNDED) . . . . OFFICERS FROM THE STATE OF NEW YORK IN UNITED STATES SERVICE WHO WERE KILLED OR MORTALLY WOUNDED AT GETTYSBURG JULY 1, 2, 3, 1863 GENERAL OFFICERS BVT. MAJOR GENL. SAMUEL K. ZOOK BRIG. GENL. STEPHEN H. WEED 8TH N.Y. CAVALRY CAPT. CHARLES D. FOLLETT 2ND N.Y. BATTERY LIEUT. F.J.T. BLUME 14TH N.Y. BATTERY CAPT. JAMES MCKAY RORTY 3RD U.S. ARTILLERY LIEUT. MANNING LIVINGSTON 4TH U.S. ARTILLERY LIEUT. ALONZO H. CUSHING, LIEUT. BAYARD WILKESON; 11TH U.S. INFNTRY LIEUT. AMAZIAH J. BARBER 12TH U.S. INFANTRY LIEUT. SILAS A. MILLER 39TH N.Y. INFANTRY LIEUT. THEORDORE PAUSCH, LIEUT. ADOLPH WAGNER 40TH N.Y. INFANTRY LIEUT. WILLIAM H.H, JOHNSON 41ST N.Y. INFANTRY LIEUT. RHINEHOLD WINZER 43RD N.Y. INFANTRY CAPT. WILLIAM H. GILFILLAN 44TH N.Y. INFANTRY CAPT. LUCIUS S. LARRABEE, LIEUT. EUGENE L. DUNHAM, LIEUT. BENJAMIN N. THOMAS 52ND N.Y. INFANTRY MAJOR EDWARD VENUTI 58TH N.Y. INFANTRY CAPT. GUSTAVE STOLDT, CAPT. EDWARD ANTONIESKI, LIEUT. LOUIS DEITRICH 59TH N.Y. INFANTRY LT. COLONEL MAX A. THOMAN, LIEUT. WILLIAM H. POHLMAN . . 60TH N.Y. INFANTRY LIEUT. MYRON D. STANLEY 61ST N.Y. INFANTRY LIEUT. FRANKLIN K. GARLAND 64TH N.Y. INFANTRY CAPT. HENRY V. FULLER, LIEUT. ALFRED H. LEWIS, LIEUT. WILLIS C. BABCOCK, LIEUT. IRA S. THURBER 66TH N.Y. INFANTRY CAPT. GEORGE H. INGE, CAPT. ELIJAH F. MUNN 68TH N.Y. INFANTRY CAPT. OTTO FRIEDRICH 71ST N.Y. INFANTRY LIEUT. ANDREW W. ESTES 72ND N.Y. INFANTRY LIEUT. CHARLES A. FOSS 73RD N.Y. INFANTRY CAPT. EUGENE C. SHINE, LIEUT. WILIAM L. HERBERT, LIEUT. JAMES MARKSMAN, LIEUT. GEORGE P. DENNEN, LIEUT. MARTIN E. HIGGINS 74TH N.Y. INFANTRY CAPT. WILLIAM H. CHESTER 76TH N.Y. INFANTRY MAJOR ANDREW J. GROVER, CAPT. ROBERT B. EVERETT, CAPT. ROBERT STORY, LIEUT. PHILIP KEELER, LIEUT. ROBERT C. NOXON 80TH N.Y. INFANTRY CAPT. JOSEPH S. CORBIN, CAPT. AMBROSE N. BALDWIN, LIEUT. GEORGE W. BRANKSTONE 82ND N.Y. INFANTRY LT. COLONEL JAMES HUSTON, CAPT. JONAH C. HOYT, LIEUT. JOHN H. MCDONALD, LIEUT. JOHN CRANSTON . 83RD N.Y. INFANTRY CAPT. THOMAS W. QUIRK, LIEUT. CHARLES A. CLARK 86TH N.Y. INFANTRY CAPT. JOHN N. WARNER 88TH N.Y. INFANTRY LIEUT. WILLIAM MCCLELLAND 97TH N.Y. INFANTRY LIEUT. RUSH P. CADY, LIEUT. WILLIAM J. MORRIN, LIEUT. JAMES H. STYLES 102ND N.Y. INFANTRY CAPT. JOHN MEAD, LIEUT. JOSIAH V. UPHAM 104TH N.Y. INFANTRY LIEUT. THOMAS JOHNSTON 108TH N.Y. INFANTRY LIEUT. CARL V. AMIET, LIEUT. DAYTON T. CARD, LIEUT. ROBERT EVANS 111TH N.Y. INFANTRY LIEUT. JOHN H. DRAKE, LIEUT. AUGUSTUS W. PROSEUS, LIEUT ERASTUS M. GRANGER 119TH N.Y. INFANTRY CAPT. OTTO TRUMPELMAN, LIEUT. EMIL FROST, LIEUT. MATTHIAS ROSEMAN 120TH N.Y. INFANTRY CAPT. AYRES C. BARKER, CAPT. LANSING HOLLISTER, LIEUT. MICHAEL E. CREIGHTON, LIEUT. JASON CARLE, LIEUT. WILLIAM J. COCKBURN, LIEUT. JOHN R. BURHANS, LIEUT. FREDERICK FREELEWICK, LIEUT. EDWARD H. KETCHUM 123RD N.Y. INFANTRY CAPT. NORMAN F. WEER . . . 124TH N.Y. INFANTRY COLONEL A. VAN HORN ELLIS, MAJOR JAMES CROMWELL, CAPT. ISAAC NICHOLS, LIEUT. J. MILNOR BROWN 125TH N.Y. INFANTRY COLONEL GEORGE L. WILLARD, CAPT. EPHRAIM WOOD 126TH N.Y. INFANTRY COLONEL ELIAKIM SHERRILL, CAPT. ISAAC SHIMER, CAPT. ORIN J. HERENDEEN, CAPT. CHARLES M. WHEELER, LIEUT. JACOB SHERMAN, LIEUT. RUFUS P. HOLMES 134TH N.Y. INFANTRY LIEUT. HENRY I. PALMER, LIEUT. LUCIUS MEAD 137TH N.Y. INFANTRY CAPT. OSCAR C. WILLIAMS, CAPT. JOSEPH H. GREGG, LIEUT. JOHN H. VAN EMBURGH, LIEUT. HENRY C. HELLETT 140TH N.Y. INFANTRY COLONEL PATRICK H. O’RORKE, LIEUT. CHARLES P. KLEIN, LIEUT. HUGH MCGRAW 147TH N.Y. INFANTRY LIEUT. WILLIAM P. SCHENCK, LIEUT. DAVID C. VAN DUSEN, LIEUT. SYLVESTER J. TAYLOR, LIEUT. GUILFORD D. MACE, LIEUT. DANIEL MCASSY 157TH N.Y. INFANTRY LIEUT. COLONEL GEORGE ARROWSMITH, CAPT. JASON K. BACKUS, CAPT. HARRISON FRANK, CAPT. GEORGE A. ADAMS, LIEUT. JOSEPH F. HENRY, LIEUT. RANDALL D. LOWER 1ST U.S. SHARPSHOOTERS CAPT. CHARLES D. MCLEAN ADDITIONAL PHOTOS -NPS Photo, During a Monument Cleaning, July 2018 -NPS Photo, During a Monument Cleaning, July 2018 -LOC Photo by Carol M. Highsmith, 2019. -NPS Photo, During a Monument Cleaning, July 2018 ADDITIONAL READING Final Report on the Battlefield of Gettysburg, by the New York Monuments Commission, 1902. Guide to Gettysburg Battlefield Monuments, by Tom Huntington, 2013. RELATED LINKS https://gettysburg.stonesentinels.com/union-monuments/new-york/new-york-state/ https://www.gettysburgdaily.com/new-york-state-monument/ https://www.gettysburgdaily.com/new-york-state-monument-cleaned/ The following information is provided for citations. Article Title: State of New York Monument (Gettysburg) Article Subject: Civil War Monuments, Structures, & Other Points of Interest Author: ★Mike Kendra, @CivilWarTalk Website Name: CivilWarTalk.com URL: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/state-of-new-york-monument-gettysburg.165447/ Publisher: CivilWarTalk, LLC Original Published Date: January 14, 2020 Located at Gettysburg National Military Park, in Adams County, Pennsylvania (rev.6/1/21) National Monuments Eternal Light Peace Memorial ★ Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial ★ High Water Mark Lincoln Speech Memorial ★ Soldiers' National Monument U.S. State Monuments DE ★ IN ★ MD ★ NY ★ NY Auxiliary ★ PA ★ VT ★ U.S. Regulars C.S. State Monuments AL ★ AR ★ DE ★ FL ★ GA ★ LA ★ MD ★ MS ★ NC ★ SC ★ TN ★ TX ★ VA Union Regimentals CT ★ DE ★ IL ★ IN ★ ME ★ MD ★ MA ★ MI ★ MN NH ★ NJ ★ NY ★ OH ★ PA ★ RI ★ VT ★ WV ★ WI ★ U.S. Regulars
Brigadier General Gouverneur Kemble Warren Monument :us34stars: Gettysburg NMP, ©Michael Kendra, 2003. On the second day of the Battle of Gettysburg, July 2, 1863, Warren initiated the defense of Little Round Top, recognizing the importance of the undefended position on the left flank of the Union Army, and directing, on his own initiative, the brigade of Col. Strong Vincent to occupy it just minutes before it was attacked. Warren suffered a minor neck wound during the Confederate assault. MONUMENT PROFILE Battlefield: Gettysburg National Military Park, Pennsylvania Location: Crest of Little Round Top Map Coordinates: +39° 47' 33.00", -77° 14' 11.76" Leader of: Chief of Engineers, Army of the Potomac Biography: Gouverneur Kemble Warren MONUMENT DETAILS Artists: Sculptor: Karl Gerhardt Founder: Henry-Bonnard Bronze Company Dedicated: August 8, 1888 Dimensions: Sculpture: H. 9 ft. Base: W. 2 ft. x D. 2 ft. Weight: 1,500 lbs. Cost: $5,000.00 in 1888 Description: A bronze standing portrait of General Warren holding binoculars in his raised proper right hand. The sculpture rests on a boulder atop Little Round Top near the Union line later occupied by the 155th Pennsylvania Infantry. General Warren is portrayed looking over the battlefield as he did on July 2, 1863 when he ordered the Union troops to defend Little Round Top from advancing Confederate troops. Remarks: A bronze tablet is set into the side of the boulder, and “Warren” is carved into the stone. MONUMENT TEXT LED TO THIS SPOT__ BY HIS MILITARY SAGACITY ON JULY 2, 1863,_______ GENERAL GOUVERNEUR KEMBLE WARREN, THE CHIEF ENGINEER OF THE ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, DETECTED GENERAL HOOD'S FLANKING MOVEMENT, AND BY PROMPTLY ASSUMING THE RESPONSIBILITY OF ORDERING TROOPS TO THIS PLACE, SAVED THE KEY OF THE UNION POSITION._________________________ PROMOTED FOR GALLANT SERVICES__ FROM THE COMMAND OF A REGIMENT IN 1861, THROUGH SUCCESSIVE GRADES TO THE COMMAND OF THE 2D ARMY CORPS IN 1863, AND PERMANENTLY ASSIGNED TO THAT OF THE 5TH ARMY CORPS IN 1864.__________________ MAJOR GENERAL WARREN NEEDS NO EULOGY. HIS NAME IS ENSHRINED IN THE HEARTS OF HIS COUNTRYMEN. THIS STATUE__ IS ERECTED UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THE VETERAN ORGANIZATION OF HIS OLD REGIMENT, THE 5TH NEW YORK VOLS., DURYEE ZOUAVES, IN MEMORY OF THEIR BELOVED COMMANDER._____________________________________ DEDICATED AUGUST 8TH, 1888 MONUMENT DEDICATION -Articles from the Newspaper: Gettysburg Compiler, August 7th and 14th, 1888 Click on Article to Zoom-In ADDITIONAL PHOTOS Warren Monument in the artists studio in clay form before going to the foundry to be cast. -Date & Location Unknown. LOC Photo, c.1903 Brig. Gen. Gouverneur Kemble Warren Monument Gettysburg NMP, -NPS Photo, Date Unknown. Veterans Photographed Standing on the Warren Rock, 1913. Image -From: Pennsylvania at Gettysburg, Vol. 3., 1914. [SLIDE=center] ADDITIONAL READING "Happiness Is Not My Companion": The Life of General G. K. Warren, by David M. Jordan, 2001. Guide to Gettysburg Battlefield Monuments, by Tom Huntington, 2013. RELATED LINKS https://gettysburg.stonesentinels.com/monuments-to-individuals/gouverneur-warren/ https://www.gettysburgdaily.com/warren-statue-its-not-easy-turning-green/ The following information is provided for citations. Article Title: Brigadier General Gouverneur Kemble Warren Monument (Gettysburg) Authors: ★ CivilWarTalk Website Name: CivilWarTalk.com URL: Publisher: CivilWarTalk, LLC Original Published Date: January 8, 2020 Located at Gettysburg National Military Park, in Adams County, Pennsylvania (rev.6/1/21) National Monuments Eternal Light Peace Memorial ★ Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial ★ High Water Mark Lincoln Speech Memorial ★ Soldiers' National Monument U.S. State Monuments DE ★ IN ★ MD ★ NY ★ NY Auxiliary ★ PA ★ VT ★ U.S. Regulars C.S. State Monuments AL ★ AR ★ DE ★ FL ★ GA ★ LA ★ MD ★ MS ★ NC ★ SC ★ TN ★ TX ★ VA Union Regimentals CT ★ DE ★ IL ★ IN ★ ME ★ MD ★ MA ★ MI ★ MN NH ★ NJ ★ NY ★ OH ★ PA ★ RI ★ VT ★ WV ★ WI ★ U.S. Regulars
State of Arkansas Monument ©Michael Kendra, taken between 1999 & 2005. :CSA1stNat: MONUMENT PROFILE Battlefield: Gettysburg National Military Park, Pennsylvania Location: West Confederate Avenue across from Snyder Farmhouse Map Coordinates: 39° 47' 33.36", -77° 15' 18.36" Men Engaged at Gettysburg from Arkansas: 480 Gettysburg Casualties from Arkansas: 180 or 38% MONUMENT DETAILS Fabricator: Cobb Memorials Founder: Reynolds Metal Company Dedicated: June 18, 1966 Dimensions: Sculpture: H. 8 ft. 6 in. x L. 20 ft. x W. 8 ft.; Cubes: 2 x 2 ft. Description: Granite marker with carved outline of the State of Arkansas and text in center, flanked by grouping of soldiers on either side. The monument stands atop a three-stepped platform with four cast aluminum cubes with etchings of the Confederate battle flag positioned at each corner of the lower step. Cost: $50,000.00 (March 1965) MONUMENT TEXT "THE GRATEFUL PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF ARKANSAS ERECT THIS MEMORIAL AS AN EXPRESSION OF THEIR PRIDE IN THE OFFICERS AN MEN OF THE THIRD ARKANSAS INFANTRY CONFEDERATE STATES ARMY, WHO BY THEIR VALOR AND THEIR BLOOD HAVE MADE THIS GROUND FOREVER HALLOWED." THE THIRD ARKANSAS INFANTRY CONFEDERATE STATES ARMY ADDITIONAL PHOTOS Monument arrives by truck, 1966. View on Trailer, 1966. RELATED LINKS http://gettysburg.stonesentinels.com/confederate-monuments/confederate-state-monuments/arkansas/ The following information is provided for citations. Article Title: State of Arkansas Monument (Gettysburg) Article Subject: Civil War Monuments, Structures, & Other Points of Interest Author: ★Mike Kendra, @CivilWarTalk Website Name: CivilWarTalk.com URL: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/state-of-arkansas-monument-gettysburg.165303/ Publisher: CivilWarTalk, LLC Original Published Date: January 7, 2020 Located at Gettysburg National Military Park, in Adams County, Pennsylvania (rev.6/1/21) National Monuments Eternal Light Peace Memorial ★ Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial ★ High Water Mark Lincoln Speech Memorial ★ Soldiers' National Monument U.S. State Monuments DE ★ IN ★ MD ★ NY ★ NY Auxiliary ★ PA ★ VT ★ U.S. Regulars C.S. State Monuments AL ★ AR ★ DE ★ FL ★ GA ★ LA ★ MD ★ MS ★ NC ★ SC ★ TN ★ TX ★ VA Union Regimentals CT ★ DE ★ IL ★ IN ★ ME ★ MD ★ MA ★ MI ★ MN NH ★ NJ ★ NY ★ OH ★ PA ★ RI ★ VT ★ WV ★ WI ★ U.S. Regulars
State of Delaware Monument ©Michael Kendra, April 2002. :us34stars: :CSA1stNat: MONUMENT PROFILE Battlefield: Gettysburg National Military Park, Pennsylvania Location: Taneytown Road near site of the old Cyclorama building Map Coordinates: +39° 48' 57.96", -77° 13' 57.00" Men Engaged at Gettysburg: 485 Gettysburg Casualties: 160 or 33% MONUMENT DETAILS Artist: Ron Tunison & Richard Dayton Dedicated: April 29, 2000 Dimensions: Foundation: 11 feet x 8 feet Description: An pillar of Vermont granite adorned on the front with a 5' X 6' bronze relief plaque depicting Delaware's First Regiment repelling Pickett's Charge on Cemetery Ridge. On the back of the stone is a bronze inscription plaque listing 691 Union soldiers from Delaware. At the base of the memorial is an inscription memorializing both the Union and Confederate soldiers who fought at Gettysburg. Cost: $200,000 (April 2000) Remarks: The memorial was installed by the Delaware Civil War Society, a non-profit group formed with the intent of establishing a memorial to honor of those from Delaware who fought at Gettysburg. MONUMENT TEXT DELAWARE AT GETTYSBURG THE FIRST AND SECOND DELAWARE INFANTRY REGIMENTS ARRIVED ON THE BATTLEFIELD EARLY ON JULY 2 AND TOOK POSITIONS IN THE FEDERAL LINE ALONG CEMETERY RIDGE. THAT DAY, BOTH UNITS DISTINGUISHED THEMSELVES IN FIERCE FIGHTING. THE FIRST DEFENDED THE BLISS FARM. AND THE SECOND HELPED TO HOLD THE WHEATFIELD AGAINST THE CONFEDERATE ATTEMPT TO TURN THE FEDERAL LEFT FLANK ON JULY 3. THE TWO REGIMENTS PLAYED KEY ROLES IN REPULSING LEE'S ASSAULT. THEY EACH LOST NEARLY A QUARTER OF THEIR MEN AT GETTYSBURG AND WERE COMMENDED FOR DISTINGUISHED SERVICE. THREE SOLDIERS RECEIVED THE MEDAL OF HONOR FOR HEROISM UNDER FIRE AND TWO FOR THE CAPTURE OF REGIMENTAL COLORS. ON JULY 5, THE FIRST AND SECOND DELAWARE, WITH THE ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, LEFT GETTYSBURG IN PURSUIT OF LEE'S ARMY. = THIS MEMORIAL IS DEDICATED TO ALL DELAWAREANS WHO FOUGHT AT GETTYSBURG, BOTH UNION AND CONFEDERATE. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS Detail of the Bronze Relief on the Delaware Monument Photo Gettysburg Daily, June 22, 2012. RELATED LINKS http://gettysburg.stonesentinels.com/union-monuments/delaware/state-of-delaware/ https://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WMG7BJ_Delaware_State_Monument_Gettysburg_PA The following information is provided for citations. Article Title: State of Delaware Monument (Gettysburg) Article Subject: Civil War Monuments, Structures, & Other Points of Interest Author: ★Mike Kendra, @CivilWarTalk Website Name: CivilWarTalk.com URL: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/state-of-delaware-monument-gettysburg.165304/ Publisher: CivilWarTalk, LLC Original Published Date: January 6, 2020 Located at Gettysburg National Military Park, in Adams County, Pennsylvania (rev.6/1/21) National Monuments Eternal Light Peace Memorial ★ Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial ★ High Water Mark Lincoln Speech Memorial ★ Soldiers' National Monument U.S. State Monuments DE ★ IN ★ MD ★ NY ★ NY Auxiliary ★ PA ★ VT ★ U.S. Regulars C.S. State Monuments AL ★ AR ★ DE ★ FL ★ GA ★ LA ★ MD ★ MS ★ NC ★ SC ★ TN ★ TX ★ VA Union Regimentals CT ★ DE ★ IL ★ IN ★ ME ★ MD ★ MA ★ MI ★ MN NH ★ NJ ★ NY ★ OH ★ PA ★ RI ★ VT ★ WV ★ WI ★ U.S. Regulars
Eternal Light Peace Memorial ©Michael Kendra, April 2002. :us34stars: :CSA1stNat: MONUMENT PROFILE Battlefield: Gettysburg National Military Park, Pennsylvania Location: North Confederate Ave, On Oak Hill Map Coordinates: +39° 50' 54.60", -77° 14' 36.60" MONUMENT DETAILS Artists: Architect: Paul Philippe Cret Sculptor: Lee Oskar Lawrie Contractor: George A. Fuller Company Dedicated: July 3rd, 1938 Rededicated July 3rd, 1988 Dimensions: Overall: 40 x 42 x 85 ft. Shaft: H. 40 ft. Relief: H. 8 ft. Platform: L. 85 ft. x W. 42 ft. Cost: $60,000.00 (July 1938) Description: A tall square shaft rising from the center of a stone platform is topped by a bronze urn for an eternal flame. On the south face of the shaft is a relief symbolizing peace and good will as it now exists between the north and south of the nation. It features two embracing female figures holding a wreath while an eagle stands at their feet. Remarks: The memorial was dedicated by President Franklin Roosevelt on July 3rd, 1938, the 75th anniversary of the battle. One Union and one Confederate veteran unveiled the 47 1/2 foot tall shaft. Roosevelt compared the task of the men of the 1860's with the men of his day: "All of them we honor, not asking under which Flag they fought then - thankful that they stand together under one Flag now." In less than five years the sons and grandsons of these veterans would be standing together in unimaginably terrible battles against enemies around the world. Over 250,000 people attended the dedication, with an estimated 100,000 more unable to make it due to overcrowded highways. Over 1,800 Civil War veterans attended what was to be the last reunion, all of them at least in their nineties. They lived in a luxurious tent camp complete with electricity and boardwalks set up in the fields north of Gettysburg College, attended by a host of Boy Scouts. The memorial's $60,000 cost was provided by donations from states both north and south. The shaft is of a light colored Alabama limestone. The lower section was originally Alabama limestone that deteriorated and had to be replaced by grey Maine granite. During WWII the light was reduced to just a pilot light. There was a nuclear arms protest at the site in 1962. The monument was the inspiration for the eternal flame on President Kennedy's grave at Arlington National Cemetery. In 1974 the flame was extinguished by order of Congress, which prohibited open flames (during the energy crisis) except the Eternal Flame on the grave of JFK. The extinguished gas flame was replaced by an electric light in 1976. Finally the gas flame was reinstalled during the 50th anniversary ceremonies and rededicated July 3, 1988. MONUMENT TEXT ETERNAL PEACE LIGHT MEMORIAL Dedicated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt during the observance of the 75th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg, July 3, 1938 AN ENDURING LIGHT TO GUIDE US IN UNITY AND FELLOWSHIP WITH FIRMNESS IN THE RIGHT AS GOD GIVES US TO SEE THE RIGHT ------------------------------ LINCOLN ETERNAL IN A NATION UNITED MONUMENT DEDICATION ADDITIONAL PHOTOS Re-routing of North Confederate Avenue and Construction of Memorial, 1937 Work being done on the Eternal Light Peace Memorial, 1941. Aerial image of the Peace Light dedication ceremonies on July 3, 1938. View of Dedication, July 3, 1938. Peace Light after conversion to Electric Lighting Photo -Gary Todd, taken on July 19, 1978 Vandalism on the north and east sides of the Eternal Light Peace Memorial, Thursday, January 8, 2009. Photo GettysburgDaily, 2009. RELATED LINKS https://www.gettysburgdaily.com/eternal-light-peace-memorial/ https://www.gettysburgdaily.com/peace-light-vandalism/ https://www.gettysburgdaily.com/peace-light-some-photographs-taken-when-the-vandalism-was-first-discovered/ https://www.gettysburgdaily.com/peace-light-progress/ https://www.gettysburgdaily.com/peace-light-monument-mostly-cleaned-of-vandalism/ https://www.gettysburgdaily.com/eternal-light-peace-memorial-restoration-continues/ https://gettysburg.stonesentinels.com/other-monuments/eternal-light-peace-memorial/ The following information is provided for citations. Article Title: Eternal Light Peace Memorial Article Subject: Civil War Monuments, Structures, & Other Points of Interest Author: ★Mike Kendra, @CivilWarTalk Website Name: CivilWarTalk.com URL: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/eternal-light-peace-memorial-gettysburg.165463/ Publisher: CivilWarTalk, LLC Original Published Date: December 3, 2019 Located at Gettysburg National Military Park, in Adams County, Pennsylvania (rev.6/1/21) National Monuments Eternal Light Peace Memorial ★ Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial ★ High Water Mark Lincoln Speech Memorial ★ Soldiers' National Monument U.S. State Monuments DE ★ IN ★ MD ★ NY ★ NY Auxiliary ★ PA ★ VT ★ U.S. Regulars C.S. State Monuments AL ★ AR ★ DE ★ FL ★ GA ★ LA ★ MD ★ MS ★ NC ★ SC ★ TN ★ TX ★ VA Union Regimentals CT ★ DE ★ IL ★ IN ★ ME ★ MD ★ MA ★ MI ★ MN NH ★ NJ ★ NY ★ OH ★ PA ★ RI ★ VT ★ WV ★ WI ★ U.S. Regulars
©Michael Kendra, September 23, 2012. :CSA1stNat: Located on the Manassas National Battlefield, this cemetery contains the remains of Confederate soldiers from the First and Second Battles of Manassas. LANDMARK DETAILS Battlefield: Manassas National Battlefield Park, Manassas, VA Location: Lee Highway, U.S. 29, east of Groveton Road / Featherbed Lane Map Coordinates: +38° 48' 50", -77° 32' 45" Established: 1867 Number of Burials: 266 Confederate soldiers Known: 2 Unknown: 264 Current Owner: National Park Service (Acquired in 1973) Admission: Free and open to the general public HISTORY OF GROVETON CONFEDERATE CEMETERY ©Michael Kendra, September 23, 2012. During the 1st and 2nd Battles of Manassas, heavy fire often kept either side from claiming their dead, and after both battles the armies had to maneuver quickly. Some of the wounded lay for days in the blistering sun. Neither side had anticipated the war's cost in blood. After the fighting at Manassas, burial details dug shallow graves where soldiers had fallen. There was little time for ceremony. Crude wooden headboards sometimes noted the soldier's name and regiment. Many went to their graves anonymously. The process took weeks. Autumn rains soon washed away the thin cover of soil, exposing the remains. The Bull Run and Groveton Ladies' Memorial Association, established in 1867, launched a campaign to recover Confederate dead from the battlefield. The organization established this cemetery and orchestrated the re-interment of an estimated 500 soldiers. Few could be identified and only two graves have individual headstones. Many of the Union dead were reburied in Arlington National Cemetery. Of the 266 soldiers buried here, only two are fully identified. KNOWN BURIALS James Jerman Palmer William Goodwyn Rilley MONUMENT TEXT Erected by the Bull Run Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, and dedicated on August 31, 1904, the memorial is dedicated to memory of the Confederate soldiers whom gave their lives at the Second Battle of Manassas, August 28 to 30, 1862. (Translation to Latin Text at top of monument: "It is right and proper to die for one’s country.") DULCE ET DECORUM EST PRO PATRIA MORI. ERECTED BY THE UNITED DAUGHTERS OF THE CONFEDERACY TO THE CONFEDERATE DEAD WE CARE NOT WHENCE THEY CAME, DEAR IN THEIR LIFELESS CLAY! WHETHER UNKNOWN OR KNOWN TO FAME, THEIR CAUSE AND COUNTRY STILL THE SAME. THEY DIED—AND WORE THE GRAY. (A stanza from the poem “March of the Deathless Dead” by Father Abram J. Ryan, Confederate Army Chaplain.) They sleep well in their unknown graves on this far-away battle field. They gave their lives in defense of their country on the fields of the First and Second Manassas. But for them the counting of time is not: for they dwell in the City of God. LOCATION MAP VIEW MONUMENT MAP ADDITIONAL PHOTOS New iron fence surrounding the cemetery, ca. 1902 -NPS Photo The Morning Post, 31 Aug 1904, Wed, Page 2 The Washington Post, 31 Aug 1904, Wed, Page 4 The New York Times, 31 Aug 1904, Wed, Page 7 The Groveton Confederate Cemetery, ca. 1930 -NPS Photo RELATED LINKS https://www.hmdb.org/marker.asp?marker=408&Result=1
Photo ©Michael Kendra, October 13, 2002Stone Bridge crosses Bull Run at the eastern entrance of the Manassas National Battlefield Park. The original bridge, built in 1825, was destroyed during the First Battle of Bull Run (First Manassas) on July 21, 1861, the first major land battle of the American Civil War. In 1884, a new bridge, similar to the original design, was built on the site of the old bridge. LANDMARK PROFILE Also Known As: Fauquier and Alexandria Turnpike Bridge Battlefield: Manassas National Battlefield Park, Manassas, Virginia Location: Crossing Bull Run Creek near U.S. Route 29 Map Coordinates: +38° 49' 27.46", -77° 30' 13.48" Built: 1825, Destroyed with Explosives by Confederates on July 21, 1861 Rebuilt: 1884, Repaired & Stabilized 1960, 2017-2018 Construction: 158' Stone two arch bridge Architect: Fauquier and Alexandria Turnpike Company Cost in 1825: $1,500.00 Current Owner: National Park Service Admission: Free and open to the general public LOC Record: HAER VA-66 HISTORY OF STONE BRIDGEPhoto by George Barnard, March 1862, -LOC Photo Originally built of native sandstone in 1825, the turnpike bridge over Bull Run became an important landmark in the Civil War battles at Manassas. Its ability to carry traffic across the steep sided stream even at times of high water gave the Stone Bridge a key role in the Civil War. Both sides recognized its strategic importance. Union Brig. Gen. Daniel Tyler's division feigned an attack on Col. Nathan G. Evans's brigade guarding the bridge as the First Battle of Bull Run began on the morning of July 21, 1861. On March 9, 1862, the Confederates evacuated their winter camps in Centreville and Manassas in anticipation of fighting closer to Richmond. On orders from General Joseph E. Johnston, the Confederate rear guard blew up the Stone Bridge to prevent its use by the Union forces that soon occupied the area. Union Army engineers eventually constructed a temporary wooden span across Bull Run using the remaining bridge abutments. This bridge served Union General John Pope's army at the Second Battle of Manassas, August 28-30, 1862. After suffering another costly defeat, Union forces used the Warrenton Turnpike bridge as their primary line of retreat. In the early hours of August 31, the bridge was again destroyed, this time by the Union rear guard. In 1886, the Stone Bridge was reconstructed in stone on the location of the 1825 span. Some portions of the abutments may survive from the wartime structure. The new bridge, similar to the original bridge, remained open to traffic until 1926 when a modern highway bridge was constructed downstream. In 1928, the United Daughters of the Confederacy erected a small pyramid monument on the bridge. The National Park Service acquired the Stone Bridge in 1959. Around 1960, Manassas National Battlefield Park performed an extensive restoration on the historic structure in preparation for the 100th Anniversary of First Manassas in 1961. LOCATION MAP VIEW MONUMENT MAP ADDITIONAL PHOTOS Ruins of Stone Bridge, Bull Run Alexander Gardner, March 1862, LOC New bridge built by McDowell's engineers photographer's wagon at left Tomothy O'Sullivan, August 1862, LOC NPS Photo, ca. 1900 NPS Photo, 1923 Stone Bridge photograph taken from the new bridge. The Stone Bridge was closed to automobile traffic in 1925. NPS Photo, 1936 In the 1920s, the State Department of Highways diverted turnpike traffic to a newly built concrete bridge, downstream of the Stone Bridge. NPS Photo, 1940 Taken from the modern bridge that crosses Bull Run. The amount of vines, weeds, and other vegetation seen growing on the structure slowly posed a risk to the integrity of the bridge. NPS Photo, June 18, 1952 Stone Bridge, during flooding caused by severe weather. NPS Photo, 1960 Flooding after storm. NPS Photo, July 12, 2013 RELATED LINKS http://stonesentinels.com/manassas/tour-manassas-battlefield/stop-12-stone-bridge/ https://www.nps.gov/mana/learn/historyculture/places.htm https://www.nps.gov/mana/learn/management/stone-bridge-project.htm
State of Vermont Monument ©Michael Kendra, April 2002. :us34stars: MONUMENT PROFILE Battlefield: Gettysburg National Military Park, Pennsylvania Location: Hancock Avenue, just North of the Pennsylvania Monument Map Coordinates: +39° 48' 33.98", -77° 14' 10.93" Men Engaged at Gettysburg from Vermont: 4,360 Gettysburg Casualties from Vermont: 415 or 10% MONUMENT DETAILS Artist: Sculptor: Karl Gerhardt Fabricator: Frederick & Field Dedicated: October 9, 1889 Dimensions: Overall: H. 66 ft. Base: W. 17 ft. 5 in. x D. 17 ft. 5 in. Statue H. 11 ft. Cost: $11,750.00 in 1889 Description: At the top of a tall granite column is a bronze sculpture depicting Brig. Gen. George Stannard holding a sword in his proper left hand. At the foot of the column is a square base which rests on a three granite steps. The front or west side of the Vermont State Monument contains a bas relief carving of the state’s coat of arms. Remarks: The statue depicts Stannard missing his right arm. Although he was wounded by an explosion of an artillery shell at Gettysburg on July 3rd, he did not lose his arm here. He lost his arm on September 29, 1864 in the Battle of Fort Harrison, near Petersburg, Virginia. MONUMENT TEXT VERMONT IN HONOR OF HER SONS WHO FOUGHT ON THIS FIELD. FIRST VERMONT BRIGADE: SECOND, THIRD, FOURTH, FIFTH AND SIXTH REGIMENTS; BRIG. GEN. L. A. GRANT COMMANDING; SECOND BRIGADE, SECOND DIVISION, SIXTH CORPS. —- THE BRIGADE REACHED THE FIELD NEAR LITTLE ROUND TOP IN THE AFTERNOON OF JULY 2, 1863, BY A FORCED MARCH OF THIRTY-TWO MILES, AND SOON AFTER WAS ASSIGNED TO THE LEFT UNION FLANK, WHERE IT HELD A LINE FROM THE SUMMIT OF ROUND TOP TO THE TANEYTOWN ROAD UNTIL THE CLOSE OF THE BATTLE. SECOND VERMONT BRIGADE: TWELFTH, THIRTEENTH, FOURTEENTH, FIFTEENTH AND SIXTEENTH REGIMENTS BRIG. GEN. GEORGE STANNARD COMMANDING THIRD BRIGADE, THIRD DIVISION, FIRST CORPS. —- THE BRIGADE ARRIVED ON CEMETERY HILL JULY 1, 1863. THE TWELFTH AND FIFTEENTH REGIMENTS WERE DETACHED TO GUARD THE CORPS TRAINS. ABOUT SUNSET, JULY 2, THE THIRTEENTH, FOURTEENTH, AND SIXTEENTH MOVED TO THIS PART OF THE FIELD, RETOOK BATTERY C, FIFTH U.S. AND RE-ESTABLISHED THE UNION LINE. —- JULY 3, THESE REGIMENTS HELD THE FRONT LINE IN ADVANCE OF THIS SPOT. IN THE CRISIS OF THE DAY, THE THIRTEENTH AND SIXTEENTH CHANGED FRONT, AND ADVANCING 200 YARDS TO THE RIGHT, ASSAULTED THE FLANK OF PICKETT’S DIVISION. THE SIXTEENTH THEN MOVED BACK 400 YARDS TO THE LEFT AND CHARGED THE FLANK OF WILCOX’S AND PERRY’S BRIGADES. THE FOURTEENTH SUPPORTED THESE CHARGES. THE BRIGADE CAPTURED THREE FLAGS AND MANY PRISONERS. FIRST VERMONT CAVALRY FIRST BRIGADE, THIRD DIVISION, CAVALRY CORPS. —- THIS REGIMENT FOUGHT STUART’S CAVALRY AT HANOVER, JUNE 30, 1863, OPPOSED HAMPTON’S CAVALRY AT HUNTERSTOWN, JULY 2, AND CHARGED THROUGH THE FIRST TEXAS INFANTRY AND UPON THE LINE OF LAW’S BRIGADE AT THE FOOT OF ROUND TOP, JULY 3. —- VERMONT SHARPSHOOTERS: CO. F. FIRST U.S.S. CO’S E AND H, SECOND U.S.S.; SECOND BRIGADE, FIRST DIVISION, THIRD CORPS. —- JULY 2, COMPANY F AIDED IN CHECKING THE ADVANCE OF WILCOX’S BRIGADE WEST OF SEMINARY RIDGE. COMPANIES E AND H RESISTED LAW’S BRIGADE WEST OF DEVIL’S DEN AND UPON THE ROUND TOPS. JULY 3, THE THREE COMPANIES TOOK PART IN THE REPULSE OF PICKETT’S CHARGE. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS Albumen silver print by William H. Tipton taken about 1889 -Image courtesy of Getty's Open Content Program. The front or west side of the Vermont State Monument contains a bas relief carving of the state’s coat of arms. Photo GettysburgDaily, September 6, 2008 Detail of Bronze Statue, After Monument cleaned and waxed. -NPS Photo, July 18, 2018 Detail of Bronze Statue, After Monument cleaned and waxed. -NPS Photo, July 18, 2018 A 120-foot lift is used to access the top of the 60-foot monument. -NPS Photo, July 18, 2018 Stannard’s left hand holds a sword; this photo shows a number of small details not visible from the ground. -NPS Photo, July 18, 2018 From up close, the eagles on Stannard’s belt and buttons are visible. -NPS Photo, July 18, 2018 REPORT FROM THE VERMONT COMMISSIONERS ON MONUMENTS AT GETTYSBURG THE STATE MONUMENT AND STANNARD STATUE. In pursuance of this new legislation, the Commissioners invited the submission of designs and proposals for a bronze statue of Gen- eral Stannard. Five artists, in different parts of the country, presented designs for this statue, or specimens of their work, and proposals were received from several bronze founders for the casting. The Commissioners became favorably impressed with the work of Mr. Karl Gerhardt, of Hartford, Conn., whose equestrian statue of Gen. Israel Putnam, at Brooklyn, Conn., and statues of Josiah Bartlett at Amesbury, Mass., and of Gen. Warren, on Little Round Top at Gettysburg, had successfully passed the ordeal of high criticism and secured for the young sculptor valuable orders from other cities and states ; and as he also made the most satisfactory proposal for the model and bronze casting, a contract was closed with him on the 31st day of January, 1889. To make a heroic portrait statue for a monument 55 feet in height was a difficult task, and the difficulty was increased by the fact that no good profile photograph of the deceased General could be found. Members of the Commission inspected the work several times during the progress of modeling the statue, and finally a plaster cast of the head was taken by the artist to Burlington and shown to Mrs. Stannard and her daughters, who pronounced it an excellent portrait. It is well known that General Stannard did not lose his right arm until some time after the battle of Gettysburg ; * but as this statue was designed to commemorate valor and typify sacrifice in the war as a whole, it was thought proper that the figure should be represented with an empty sleeve, as the hero appeared at the close of the war. The statue was cast by the Henry Bonnard Bronze Company, of New York, and was inspected at their works and accepted after they had placed it upon the monument. As was anticipated, it adds finish and impressiveness to a beautiful structure, and the monument, as a whole, is the most classic, stately and commanding object on that portion of the field, if not upon the entire field. The Commissioners congratulate the State upon the good fortune which attended their contracts, through which the work was well executed at a cost far below the estimates of many good judges of such work, who have viewed the finished structure. *Gen. Stannard lost his right arm at Fort Harrison, Va. RELATED LINKS https://www.gettysburgdaily.com/gettysburgs-vermont-state-monument/ https://gettysburg.stonesentinels.com/union-monuments/vermont/state-of-vermont/ https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=hvd.hnyutl&view=1up&seq=1 The following information is provided for citations. Article Title: State of Vermont Monument (Gettysburg) Article Subject: Civil War Monuments, Structures, & Other Points of Interest Author: ★Mike Kendra, @CivilWarTalk Website Name: CivilWarTalk.com URL: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/state-of-vermont-monument-gettysburg.165460/ Publisher: CivilWarTalk, LLC Original Published Date: November 25, 2019 Located at Gettysburg National Military Park, in Adams County, Pennsylvania (rev.6/1/21) National Monuments Eternal Light Peace Memorial ★ Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial ★ High Water Mark Lincoln Speech Memorial ★ Soldiers' National Monument U.S. State Monuments DE ★ IN ★ MD ★ NY ★ NY Auxiliary ★ PA ★ VT ★ U.S. Regulars C.S. State Monuments AL ★ AR ★ DE ★ FL ★ GA ★ LA ★ MD ★ MS ★ NC ★ SC ★ TN ★ TX ★ VA Union Regimentals CT ★ DE ★ IL ★ IN ★ ME ★ MD ★ MA ★ MI ★ MN NH ★ NJ ★ NY ★ OH ★ PA ★ RI ★ VT ★ WV ★ WI ★ U.S. Regulars
Robert E. Lee Monument :CSA1stNat: Monument Ave, Richmond, VA ©Michael Kendra, 2015. MONUMENT PROFILE Battlefield: City of Richmond, Virginia Location: Lee Circle at the intersection of Monument Avenue and Allen Avenue Map Coordinates: 37° 33' 13.70", -77° 27' 36.30" Added to National Register of Historic Places: January 5, 2007, #0600121 Added to Virginia Landmarks Register: September 6, 2006, #127-0181 MONUMENT TEXT FRONT: "LEE" BACK: "LEE" Cornerstone: “This corner-stone of a monument to be erected to the memory of General Robert E. Lee was laid with Masonic ceremonies on the 27th day of October, 1887, by the Grand Lodge of Virginia, A.F. and A. Masons.” MONUMENT DETAILS Conceived: 1870, Shortly after the death of Robert E. Lee, the Ladies' Lee Monument Association was formed from the Hollywood Cemetery Association to begin fundraising for a new monument project in Richmond. Artist: Sculptor- Marius-Jean-Antonin Mercie; Pedestal- Paul Pujol Cost: in 1887 Dollars Bronze Equestrian Sculpture Cost: $18,000.00 Base Cost $41,500.00 Additional Labor & Fees: $18,000 Total Cost Overall: About $77,500.00 (about $2.2 million in 2019 adj. for inflation) Cornerstone Placed: October 27, 1887 Dedicated: May 29, 1890 Dimensions: Sculpture- H. 21 ft. Base- H. 40 ft. Description: An equestrian bronze figure of General Lee, bare headed and in uniform, and his horse, mounted on an oval-shaped granite pedestal, which is flanked on both sides by two gray marble columns. Lee sits erect and proud, loosely holding the reigns to the head of his bowing horse. The statue is oriented to the south and was the first monument constructed on Monument Avenue. The base is unfinished from its original design which included allegorical groups on the south and north. The front would have included a figure of Liberty with a confederate soldier at her feet as she leaned on her spear and placed her laurel wreath on his head. The rear group would have depicted the Angel of Peace taking weapons from the Goddess of War. Remarks: It was noted in the National Register of Historic Places that "the horse is not a representation of Lee’s famous mount Traveller. The sculptor did not find the size of the actual horse to be in keeping with the overall composition and therefore created an ideal mount with the necessary requirements." A time capsule was designed and integrated into the cornerstone of the new monument. The cornerstone was placed during a large public gathering on October 27, 1887. To learn about the Cornerstone Placement, and the Time Capsule and it's contents, see this page: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/did-you-know-within-the-robert-e-lee-monument-in-richmond-lies-a-secret.165624/ Within a few years, enough funds were raised and the statue was cast in several pieces, separately, and then the assembled. The statue was displayed in Paris before it was shipped to Richmond, where it arrived by rail on May 4, 1890. Newspaper accounts indicate that 10,000 people helped pull four wagons with the pieces of the monument. The completed statue was unveiled on May 29, 1890. Today, the monument serves as a traffic circle at the intersection of Monument Avenue, and Allen Avenue. The street, and area around it was called the Lee District, until around 1907. DEDICATION CEREMONYThe Times of Richmond, Page 1, May 30, 1890 On the day of the dedication, there was a four mile long parade to the site. It was attended by many former Confederates, including James Longstreet, John B. Gordon, Joseph E. Johnston, and Fitzhugh Lee. When the time came to reveal the statue, Gen. Joseph E. Johnson had the honor of puling the ropes that released the covers, unveiling the glorious statue beneath. The newspaper claims that artillery roared, and the crowed cheered for a good ten minutes. The main orator for the day's ceremony was Colonel Archer Anderson, a Virginian, and a veteran of several major battles in the eastern and western theaters of the Civil War. His father, Joseph R. Anderson, was well known as the operator of the Tredegar Iron Works in Richmond. Excerpt from Archer Anderson's Dedication of the Monument to Gen. Robert E. Lee "Let this monument, then, teach to generations yet unborn these lessons of his life! Let it stand, not as a record of civil strife, but as a perpetual protest against whatever is low and sordid in our public and private objects! Let it stand as a memorial of personal honor that never brooked a stain, of knightly valor without thought of self, of far-reaching military genius unsoiled by ambition, of heroic constancy from which no cloud of misfortune could ever hide the path of duty! Let it stand for reproof and censure, if our people shall ever sink below the standards of their fathers! Let it stand for patriotic hope and cheer, if a day of national gloom and disaster shall ever dawn upon our country! Let it stand as the embodiment of a brave and virtuous people's ideal leader! Let it stand as a great public act of thanksgiving and praise, for that it pleased Almighty God to bestow upon these Southern States a man so formed to reflect His attributes of power, majesty, and goodness!" Read Anderson's Full Oration Here: https://leefamilyarchive.org/reference/addresses/anderson/index.html During the dedication, the crowd made a giant Rebel flag of red, white, and blue colors, and a mock battle was held. The Rebel yell rang out along the avenue, recalling the glory of the army that once was. The "Crowd Made" Confederate Battle Flag, at the Lee Monument Dedication, May 29, 1890. LOCATION MAP VIEW MONUMENT MAP ADDITIONAL PHOTOS Lee Monument with covered statue next to base. 1890 Photo - - Covered Lee Equestrian Statue Mounted on top of base. 1890 Photo -Unveiling of the Equestrian Statue of Robert E. Lee May 29, 1890. Richmond, Virginia. - - -Early 1890s Photo Virginia Commonwealth University Libraries. Photo - Hal Jasperson, May 2009. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Robert_E._Lee_statue_(Richmond,_Virginia)
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