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Unmarked Confederate grave in Gettysburg

Discussion in 'Civil War History - General Discussion' started by CSA Today, Jun 4, 2013.

  1. CSA Today

    CSA Today Major

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  3. jay gale

    jay gale First Sergeant

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    is this a recent find?
     
  4. Bonny Blue Flag

    Bonny Blue Flag 2nd Lieutenant

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    What are the details? How is it known to be a Confederate grave?

    --BBF
     
  5. CSA Today

    CSA Today Major

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    The source didn’t give details about how they made the determination of allegiance, so I don’t know how they can be absolutely sure. I have read that the type of buttons and artifact found with the remains have been used to make such identifications.

    “While I am able for service I intend to stand by the cause while a banner floats to tell where freedom’s sons still supports her cause.”

    Major Walter Clark of the North Carolina Junior Reserve Brigade in a letter to his mother.
     
  6. CSA Today

    CSA Today Major

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    Source didn't say.

    “While I am able for service I intend to stand by the cause while a banner floats to tell where freedom’s sons still supports her cause.”

    Major Walter Clark of the North Carolina Junior Reserve Brigade in a letter to his mother.
     
  7. FrazierC

    FrazierC First Sergeant

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    Any idea where this picture was taken? It could help identify the approximate unit.
     
  8. pamc153PA

    pamc153PA 1st Lieutenant Forum Host

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  9. jgoodguy

    jgoodguy Brigadier General Moderator Forum Host

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    Gettysburg dead

    The Removal of the Confederate Dead from Gettysburg

    Wasted Valor August 2002 - Bits of Blue and Gray

     
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  10. jay gale

    jay gale First Sergeant

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    such a sad story, they deserved more honor than that. Heck, it wasn't until the 20th century that monuments to the Confederate units were allowed on northern fields (If my memory serves me right)
     
  11. east tennessee roots

    east tennessee roots 2nd Lieutenant

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    This is the unmarked grave behind the 2nd Maryland monument on Culp's Hill. Captain William J. Miller, a relative from Wilkes County, NC was killed July 1, 1863. The 53rd NC was part of the Daniels / Grimes Brigade. D.H. Hill / Robert Roades' Division, 2nd Corps. Were they not engaged on Culp's Hill ? Would they have buried an officer in a single grave if possible ? Thanks for posting !

    William J. Miller

    Residence Wilkes County NC; a 24 year-old Farmer.

    Enlisted on 3/25/1862 at Wilkes County, NC as a Captain.

    On 4/30/1862 he was commissioned into "K" Co. NC 53rd Infantry
    He was Killed on 7/1/1863 at Gettysburg, PA


    He was listed as:
    * Absent 6/18/1862 (place not stated) (Sick with "mumps")
    * Returned 8/1/1862 (place not stated) (Estimated day)


    Other Information:
    born in Wilkes County, NC
     
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  12. ErnieMac

    ErnieMac 2nd Lieutenant Forum Host Trivia Game Winner

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    Years ago I was told a story by a Gettysburg battlefield guide. He had been contacted by a family in Connecticut who had an ancestor that had fought and been killed on Culp's Hill. A member of his unit had written the family explaining the circumstances of his death and stating that they had buried him on the field because they were uncertain of the outcome of the battle and their ability to give him a proper burial. I can imagine that was not an unusual occurance on both sides.

    In this case the letter writer gave landmarks so the family could recover the remains if they so desired. The guide said he had been able to identify the location, did a little surreptitious digging sufficient to determine there were remains present, then refilled the hole. I don't know if this is a true story or not, but I can imagine that it might be. The unknown Confederate probably had a similar burial.
     
  13. ErnieMac

    ErnieMac 2nd Lieutenant Forum Host Trivia Game Winner

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    You are correct - Daniel's Brigade was engaged on Culp's Hill on the morning of July 3, but not on July 1. His report is attached. If buried by his comrades, it would have been an individual grave. IMO that's probably what happened in the case of the grave in this forum. If buried after the battle by the Union he would dragged to a mass grave as quickly as possible. The book A Strange and Blighted Land: Gettysburg, the Aftermath of a Battle gives a good account of how the burials on both sides were performed.

    http://www.civilwarhome.com/danielgettysburgor.htm
     
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  14. Bonny Blue Flag

    Bonny Blue Flag 2nd Lieutenant

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    Thanks, ETR.

    --BBF
     
  15. Rob9641

    Rob9641 Captain Civil War Photo Contest
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    Not exactly. The marker where Armistead fell dates from the 1880s, as does the 1st Maryland (CSA) on Culp's Hill. It was a combination of things that kept Confederate markers off the field. It was a Union victory and on Northern soil, and the southern states had little interest and not much in the way of resources to commemorate that. Granted, tho, Union veteran groups ran the show for a long time.
     
  16. Rob9641

    Rob9641 Captain Civil War Photo Contest
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    I don't think there are any known graves left on the battlefield, except of course in the National Cemetery. Undoubtedly there are remains never found, but when they are found, they are exhumed and given proper burial. I think the last one found at Gettysburg was in the 1990s at the Railroad Cut.
     
  17. east tennessee roots

    east tennessee roots 2nd Lieutenant

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    Captain Miller was captain of Company K. His brother Thomas was a 1st Lieutenant. His uncle, Thomas Land was a 3rd Lieutenant. Thomas was also a writer. He wrote a poem, " Return To The Tented Field " Where he mentions a " dear nephew " among the fallen at Gettysburg. I posted it some time ago. http://civilwartalk.com/threads/civil-war-poem.77154/
     
  18. ErnieMac

    ErnieMac 2nd Lieutenant Forum Host Trivia Game Winner

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    I was not a member when you originally posted it. It is an inspirational poem.

    Daniel's Brigade fought northwest of Gettysburg on July 1 , above the Railroad Cuts. Colonel Owen filed a report of the 53rd's role at Gettysburg.

    Report of Col. William A. Owens, Fifty-third North Carolina Infantry.

    July 19, 1863.
    Sir: In the engagement at Gettysburg, Pa., my regiment took part in the field as follows:

    On July 1, I moved from Little Creek to within 2 miles of Gettysburg, and was in line of battle at or about 1 o'clock, when we advanced through an open field, coming in sight of the enemy on the crest. The line moved forward some 200 yards, when I moved by the left flank some 300 yards, under fire. I again moved to the front some 50 or 100 yards, when I was ordered to take my regiment to the support of Gen. Iverson. I again moved by the flank, and brought them into line on the left of the Third Alabama, which was on Gen. Iverson's right. I next moved to the right of the Third Alabama, and moved forward through a wheat-field to within 50 yards of some woods in front. The Third Alabama fell back, leaving my left exposed, and I ordered my regiment back some 50 yards, it at this time being exposed to a fire on both flanks. I changed my front to the right, to face the enemy on the right. I afterward moved my regiment back to the position on the right of the Third Alabama, which was then going off to the left. I fronted, and moved forward to the woods, where I joined the right of the Twelfth North
    Carolina Infantry, and moved on through the woods to the railroad embankment, where I halted, and moved by the left to the edge of the town, where I halted and remained during the night.
     
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  19. east tennessee roots

    east tennessee roots 2nd Lieutenant

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    Many Thanks !
     

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