1. Welcome to the CivilWarTalk, a forum for questions and discussions about the American Civil War! Become a member today for full access to all of our resources, it's fast, simple, and absolutely free!
Dismiss Notice
Join and Become a Patron at CivilWarTalk!
Support this site with a monthly or yearly subscription! Active Patrons get to browse the site Ad free!
START BY JOINING NOW!

Three 1842's

Discussion in 'Civil War Weapons and Ammunition' started by Tin cup, Dec 28, 2016.

  1. Tin cup

    Tin cup 1st Lieutenant

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2010
    Messages:
    4,276
    Location:
    Texas
    An interesting photo of a Company of Federal Troops.

    What interest's me is we see everyone with 1842 Muskets, most sighted/rifled, some smooth-bore.
    In the close-up photo, I see three of those 1842's, the far right is smooth-bore, the middle one is clearly rifled with the typical long-range rear sight we normally recognize, but the third one on the left, looks like it has a rear sight that is more like that of an 1861 musket. If you look closely at the main photo in detail/enlarged, you see others with the same type rear sight.
    Can anyone tell me if it's a variation of 1842 I may not familiar with?

    Kevin Dally Camp_of_Infantry._Decorated_and_Company_on_parade_-_NARA_-_524795.jpg Camp_of_Infantry cropped.jpg
     

  2. (Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)
  3. Grayrock Volunteer

    Grayrock Volunteer Corporal

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2013
    Messages:
    295
    There is another musket with an 1858 style rear sight in the hands of the man just to the right of the officer on the left side of the frame.
    George Moller states that some rifled and sighted M1842s are known to have 1858 style rear sights, but they are fairly scarce. He speculates that those sights are encountered on the 1,500 altered at Harpers Ferry and the 110 altered at Springfield in 1859, and quite probably all alterations performed post 1861, of which numerous reports and contracts point to. Moller lists 20,076 only rifled, and 23,683 rifled and sighted from 1856 to 1859.

    March 16, 1861
    Chief of Ordnance, Col. Craig to Harpers Ferry Superintendent M.A. Barbour
    "In reply to your letter of inquiry of Mr. A. M. Ball relating to the position of the rear sight on the musket of .69 caliber, model of 1842, I have stated that the sight will be placed three inches from the breech as in the rifle musket of .58."

    Thanks for the neat image,
    Garrett
     
    Jobe Holiday, frontrank2 and Tin cup like this.
  4. James Brenner

    James Brenner Private

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2016
    Messages:
    26
    Location:
    North Canton, Ohio
    The smooth bore musket may not be a smooth bore. The government did not always place a rear sight on the M1842s it rifled and there are some contractors (Miles Greenwood) who also did not place rear sights on the muskets they rifled. My guess is that all the muskets in the picture are rifled; the logistics of having both .69 minie and round ball ammunition in the same company would be difficult.
     
    tbuckley and Jobe Holiday like this.
  5. kevikens

    kevikens Sergeant Major

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2013
    Messages:
    2,248
    Location:
    New Jersey
    I had in my collection a model 1816, rifled for .69 caliber, Maynard primer added when converted, but no rear sight of any kind. Considering the recoil of firing .69 minie balls the shooter probably shut his eyes and flinched anyway when he pulled the trigger. No rear (or even front) sight required for that.
     
    Eagle eye and frontrank2 like this.
  6. James Brenner

    James Brenner Private

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2016
    Messages:
    26
    Location:
    North Canton, Ohio
    Where did you find this image? Is this a Library of Congress photo? It's a great photo.
     
  7. Tin cup

    Tin cup 1st Lieutenant

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2010
    Messages:
    4,276
    Location:
    Texas
    I think someone posted the image on FB, I saved it to file, but I don't have any info as to the unit.

    Kevin Dally
     
  8. Tin cup

    Tin cup 1st Lieutenant

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2010
    Messages:
    4,276
    Location:
    Texas
    Another interesting photo is this one of Company A, 30th Pennsylvania who have rifled 1842's!

    Kevin Dally Co A, 30th Pennsylvania Infantry with rifled 42's.jpg
     
    James N. and Jobe Holiday like this.
  9. James Brenner

    James Brenner Private

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2016
    Messages:
    26
    Location:
    North Canton, Ohio
    Thank you. I found the photo listed in the book, Touched by Fire, a Barnes and Noble book of CW photographs. It is of Company B, 30th Pennsylvania, but no date given.
     
    Jobe Holiday likes this.
  10. 19Wyoming

    19Wyoming Cadet

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2016
    Messages:
    5
    Very Interesting photo's!
     
  11. Package4

    Package4 First Sergeant Trivia Game Winner

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2015
    Messages:
    1,113
    W
    What a great photo, as an ACW uniform buff the picture has everything, roundabout, sack, frock, kepi, forage cap, slouch hat and rain cover. The private in the roundabout even has his cap box on the wrong side and looks to have a frame buckle. Another private has a side arm in lieu of a bayonet. This looks to be fairly early war, or newly recruited, but many of the frock coats have had their collars tailored/lowered for comfort. Absence of hat brass though might indicate 1862.
     
    Jobe Holiday likes this.
  12. Package4

    Package4 First Sergeant Trivia Game Winner

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2015
    Messages:
    1,113
    Doing a little sleuthing it appears as if this is the 1st regiment of the Pennsylvania Reserve Corps known as the 30th PA 3 year regiment. The picture would have been taken in the Summer of 1862 when the regiment was a part of the 3rd Corps as indicated by the two diamonds on either side of the (arbor) B. The one has a lozenge in the center, which may indicate previous time in the 1st Corps.

    I would also proffer that the second picture, company A, was most likely taken at the same time and that the men were proud of their captain, Mott Hooten, whose name appears on their arbor.

    Both pictures indicate that the 30th was armed with 1842 Springfields, had a preference for both frock and sack coats, in addition to private purchase kepis and issue forage caps. Very little brass is evident on their hats, which would have been the second issue as the regiment at this time would have been in service for a little over a year.

    The 30th was a hard fought regiment and is listed in Fox's 100 hardest fought regiments with 139 KIA; interesting is the fact that they only lost 66 to accident or disease.
     
    Tin cup and Jobe Holiday like this.

(Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)
Loading...
Similar Threads Forum Date
Three Pound Cannons in the Civil War Civil War Weapons and Ammunition Jan 20, 2017
Nicholas Said: Black Immigrant Who Had Been a Slave on Three Continents But Fought in Civil War Immigrants During the Civil War Nov 25, 2016
Three small photos of Medal of Honor recipients Period Civil War Photos & Examinations Nov 5, 2016
The Battle for Georgia: Get three Book & Movie Review Tent Jul 23, 2016
Gunpowder Girls: The True Stories of Three Civil War Tragedies Book & Movie Review Tent Jul 19, 2016

Share This Page