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Southern Ladies and their Tobacco Habits

Discussion in 'The Ladies Tea' started by samgrant, Nov 30, 2007.

  1. samgrant

    samgrant Captain Retired Moderator

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    "According to numerous observers of the time, the most distinctive characteristic that set apart many southern women from their Northern sisters was their fondness for tobacco."

    http://www.uttyler.edu/vbetts/snuff.htm

    -

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  3. ole

    ole Brev. Brig. Gen'l Retired Moderator

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    Whoa, Sam! That was much more than I wanted to hear. Somewhere in the archives is a letter sent home a Yank occupying Corinth, MS.

    Kinda does the 'baccy thing some contemporary justice.

    ole
  4. larry_cockerham

    larry_cockerham Southern Gentleman, Lest We Forget, 2011

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    These folks could be writing about my Granny Cockerham. A finer woman never lived. Fortunately, she was neat. The brush of choice was birch, don't ask me why. I guess the fibers separated and cleaned 'well'. I work about 20 blocks from the snuff plant (Bruton, US Tobacco), but never had the urge to visit. Still don't. By the way, Granny cleaned her teeth in a snuff glass, usually the drinking vessel of choice in the mountains.

    You fellas ever hear of a "snuff eating" dog? Somehow, I don't think that phrase was meant as a compliment to the dog.
  5. blue_zouave

    blue_zouave Sergeant

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    My great-granny smoked a pipe. But nobody would have ever called her a lady!

    Zou
  6. Susan Sweet

    Susan Sweet Cadet

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    Zou , My great aunt dipped snuff. .
  7. Borderruffian

    Borderruffian 2nd Lieutenant

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    My great Grandma used Rose Tube Snuff.
  8. samgrant

    samgrant Captain Retired Moderator

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    I'm curious, and ask the last 4 posters, did you actually witness those ladies in the act, or were these passed down stories? Did they continue to do it in their old age or was it a just a youthful indulgence (as snorting cocaine will be to the future grandmothers of America).
  9. tarheel

    tarheel Cadet

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    My grandmother dipped Bruton snuff and swallowed it instead of spitting because, and I quote, "it aint ladylike to carry around a spit jar"

    My grandfather also dipped, but he did carry around a small Folgers instant coffee jar. In the cabinet of their kitchen was a full collection of Bruton Snuff drinking vessels. Both glass and the amber colored plastic ones.

    And yes, sam, I have personally witnessed her using snuff.
  10. ole

    ole Brev. Brig. Gen'l Retired Moderator

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    I envy you people who knew their grandmothers.

    Answer me a question: Was the use of chewing tobacco, snuff, snoos, unique to southern women? If any of my acquaintance ever did that sort of thing, I never saw it. (Although the first mother-in-law kept a pack of Lucky Strikes hidden.)

    Interesting subject.

    ole
  11. ole

    ole Brev. Brig. Gen'l Retired Moderator

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    At this point, I should note the re-emegence of our good friend, tarheel. Welcome back, peckerwood!

    ole
  12. blue_zouave

    blue_zouave Sergeant

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    I didn't know that particular great-grandmother personally. I have, however, seen a picture of her with her pipe!

    Zou
  13. Borderruffian

    Borderruffian 2nd Lieutenant

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    Saw her do it. She used to sit on the porch with a jelly glass and her Rose Tube.
  14. Susan Sweet

    Susan Sweet Cadet

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    The great aunt that dipped snuff use to walk around with her mouth in a funny position . My mom always said it was because of the snuff under her lip. When I was a kid the aunt was old . She died in the early 1970's . I am sure I saw her dipping it but it is a vague memory . She lived in Arizona in a shack that orginally was a TB shack for those with TB . She had no indoor toilet or running water. Her son lived next door in another shack but his he had built on and made into a house.
    Aunt Addie was born and raised in Arkansas , Her grandfather was a confederate soldier. To me as a child with that funny screwed up face and her wild white hair she was one of the scariest people I knew. When I was older she presented me with a set of the most beautiful crochet doillies I have ever seen . She said they were for my hope chest . She wasn't as scary then .

    I am guess she dipped her whole life.
  15. Rad2duhbone53

    Rad2duhbone53 Corporal

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    I find this thread quite interesting. I have this vision of Granny from the Beverly Hillbilleis chewing a huge wad .

    Now as a Northerner, I have no recollect of Nanna neither smoking nor chewing nor dipping any snuff.
    If some of you remember a commercial on TV that said "Is it polite to offer a lady a Tipparello?" well my Mom probably never saw it. She and my Dad would light up and puff away on the front steps of our house and I would have this question mark above my head trying to figure out what was so great about this. :confused:
  16. gary

    gary 1st Lieutenant

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    Surgeon General Warning

    Tobacco products are harmful to your health.

  17. gary

    gary 1st Lieutenant

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    More from the Houston Tri-Weekly Telegraph
  18. Karen Lips

    Karen Lips Sergeant Major

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    Dipping Snuff

    How embarrassing! This totally blows my image of Southern Ladies. I wonder if my ancestors dipped snuff.
  19. johan_steele

    johan_steele Lt. Colonel Retired Moderator

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    I collect period pipes, I own one "Ladies pipe" it has a very long stem and is quite mellow smoking. Women smoked as much as men along w/ snuff & chaw.

    One of my favorite pics of CW refugees has an elderly woman in the background sitting on a porch puffing away on her pipe.
  20. Bonny Blue Flag

    Bonny Blue Flag 2nd Lieutenant

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    Chewing tobacco, a little red can and Mrs. Temple

    My maternal grandfather chewed tobacco for many years. He kept an open coffe can on the floor by the right side of his rocking chair; it was aromatic, to say the least, and I had only to look in it one time to understand everyone's avoidance of this little red can. It wasn't until my teen years I committed the most henious act possible in my grandparent's home: I accidently kicked over the little red coffee can. Maybe that's why I've never developed a taste for coffee.

    Next door to my grandparent's home lived Mrs. Temple. By day, she was the standard little old lady with thin, white hair pulled back in a bun and walked with a cane. But every Friday night, she put a pinch of snuff in her lower lip, held a paper cup and turned on the t.v. to watch professional wrestling and her heartthrob, the referee Bull Dog. Don't underestimate little old ladies.

    --BBF
  21. Jules362

    Jules362 Cadet

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    Because I was born to middle-aged parents who were also born to middle-aged parents, I only knew one of my grandparents, my maternal grandmother, and she died when I was still a child. But I remember her as the oddest looking person I ever saw. She was as bow-legged as a Texas cowboy, and she had a lumpy nose that Mother said was the result of have a skin cancer removed back in the '30s and the surgery damaged the glands in her nose. She had 51 grandchildren, and a whole host of great grandchildren, and I always had the impression that she knew I was one of them but neither knew nor cared which one I might be. I remember her patting me on the back one time in a gesture that she intended to be comforting because I was crying for my daddy, and old and feeble as she was, she still packed a wallop; she nearly knocked all the air out of my lungs. She had only a few teeth, which were all a rather unpleasant shade of yellow/brown, and Mother said that came from chewing tobaccy when she was young. I have a shoebox full of letters she wrote to my mother in the 1930s and 1940s and she was surprisingly literate and intelligent. She was also a rigid Baptist, and I've never figured out how she squared that with the use of the tobacco weed.

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