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Soldiers of the Trans-Mississippi Theater

Discussion in 'The South & Western Theaters' started by AUG351, Dec 18, 2012.

  1. AUG351

    AUG351 2nd Lieutenant

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    [​IMG]
    Thomas Duvall (left) and William Duvall (right), along with their brother Henderson, enlisted in Company C, 3rd Missouri Infantry on December 10, 1861, at Richmond, Missouri, after serving with the Missouri State Guard at Wilson’s Creek and Lexington. William was promoted to junior second lieutenant on May 8, 1862.
    The Duvall brothers fought at Pea Ridge, Farmington, Iuka and Corinth. On October 4, 1862, Lieutenant William Duvall was killed during the Confederate attack on Corinth, while trying to plant the Confederate flag on the Union fortifications. Lieutenant Colonel Finley L. Hubbell, 3rd Missouri Infantry, recorded in his diary that William died waving his sword and shouting “Victory.”
    Thomas Duvall and his brother Henderson were later killed at Champion Hill, Mississippi, on May 16, 1863.

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    James A. Anderson was an eighteen-year-old farmer from Morgan County, Illinois, when he enlisted at St. Louis for three years in Company I, 11th Missouri Infantry on March 28, 1864. During his enlistment, the 11th Missouri participated in the Battle of Tupelo, Mississippi on July 14-15, 1864, and pursed Confederate General Sterling Price through Missouri. After the Battle of Nashville, the 11th saw service at Spanish Fort and Fort Blakely, Alabama.
    Anderson was mustered out of service on January 15, 1866.

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    Joseph S. Dean, a native of Kentucky and a merchant in St. Louis, enlisted in Company C, 1st Missouri Infantry (CS) at Memphis, Tennessee, in July 1861 and was soon elected a first lieutenant. In January 1862 he was appointed an acting aide-de-camp to General John S. Bowen in the Army of the Mississippi. Dean was severely wounded at the Battle of Shiloh and died a few days later in Memphis, Tennessee.
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    Group photograph of four company officers of the 5th U. S. Volunteer Infantry, identified by number. The 5th was composed of former Confederate prisoners of war who enlisted in U.S. regiments to fight Native Americans. Organized at Alton and Camp Douglas (Chicago), Illinois, from March to May 1865, the regiment moved to Fort Leavenworth and was assigned to duty in the District of Upper Arkansas and Nebraska, Colorado, Utah, and the Plains. The 5th was mustered out of service in November 1866.
    #1 Captain Barnabas D. Palmer, Company K, enlisted on April 18, 1865 and was mustered out on July 3, 1866. He had prior service in Company K, 3rd Kansas Infantry and Company C, 9th Kansas Cavalry. He died on October 18, 1880, in Lawrence, Kansas.
    #2 2nd Lieutenant A. Covell Dutcher, Company A, enlisted on April 3, 1865; in February 1866 he suffered a gunshot wound from an unknown person while on detached duty in Denver, Colorado Territory, and died on April 24, 1866, from complications of the wound. He had prior service in Company A, 66th Illinois Infantry.
    #3 Captain Thomas Mower McDougall, Company B, enlisted on June 2, 1865, was discharged on August 10, 1866, and enlisted in the Regular Army; during the Battle of the Little Big Horn in June 1876, as part of Lieutenant Colonel George A. Custer’s 7th Cavalry Regiment, McDougall escorted the regimental pack train and fought under Major Marcus Reno’s command after Custer’s death. McDougall had prior service in Company B, 48th U.S. Colored Infantry. He died in Hubberton, Vermont, on July 3, 1909.
    #4 2nd Lieutenant Howard Williams, Company B, enlisted on June 4, 1865 and was mustered out on October 11, 1866. He had prior service in Company E, 42nd Ohio Infantry and the 80th Company, 2nd Battalion, Veteran Reserve Corps.
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    Photograph of Captain Thomas Abel (left) and Lieutenant William O. Kretzinger, officers in the 56th U. S. Colored Infantry.
    Thomas Abel was born in Canada on February 15, 1837; he enlisted as a private in Company A, 4th Iowa Cavalry on September 9, 1861, at Mt. Pleasant, Iowa, and was assigned to General Samuel Curtis as an orderly and clerk. He was discharged from the 4th Iowa by General Scofield on August 11, 1863, to accept a commission as a captain in the 56th U. S. Colored Infantry.
    Abel mustered into the 56th U. S. Colored Infantry as captain of Company B on August 12, 1863, at St. Louis, Missouri. On June 16, 1865, he was assigned duties as provost marshal for the Department of Arkansas. On December 4, 1865, he was transferred to Company I, and later detached to the Freedmen’s Bureau, Department of Arkansas.
    He was mustered out of service on November 5, 1866, at Little Rock, Arkansas, and returned to Iowa.
    William O. Kretzinger, a native of Maryland and resident of Black Jack, Douglas County, Kansas, enlisted in Company C, 4th Kansas Infantry in July 1861. When the 10th Kansas was organized from the 3rd and 4th Kansas in April 1862, Kretzinger became a sergeant in Company A. When the 56th United States Colored Infantry was organized in St. Louis as the 3rd Arkansas Infantry (African Descent) in August and September 1863, Kretzinger became a lieutenant in that regiment. On July 26, 1864, the 56th was involved in a battle at Wallace’s Ferry, Big Creek, Arkansas, near Helena. Kretzinger served as Lieutenant Colonel Moses Reed’s aide, and “behaved in a brave and gallant manner.” He resigned
    from the army on July 18, 1865, as a first lieutenant.
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    James Flynt enlisted on May 2, 1862, in Company D, 2nd Arkansas Infantry, at Trenton, Arkansas.
    Flynt was killed in action at the Battle of Stones River (Murfreesboro), Tennessee, on December 31, 1862.
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    Hugh Garland joined the 1st Missouri Infantry as a captain in June 1861; the 1st Missouri Infantry was the first regiment from that state to enter Confederate service. Garland was promoted to major on May 16, 1862. The 1st Missouri Infantry participated in the 1862 battles of Shiloh and Corinth, where they suffered heavy losses; the regiment was consolidated with the 4th Missouri Infantry, becoming the 1st & 4th Missouri Consolidated Infantry.
    Major Garland was promoted to lieutenant colonel on May 16, 1863, and to colonel and commander of the regiment on May 30, 1864.
    Colonel Garland was killed holding the regimental colors during the Army of Tennessee’s assault on Union fortifications at Franklin, Tennessee, on November 30, 1864.
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    John Josey was elected major of the 15th Arkansas Infantry (Cleburne’s-Polk’s-Josey’s) in April 1862, promoted to lieutenant colonel in November 1862, and to colonel the following April; the majority of the regiment’s service was in the Western Theater, including the battles of Stones River and Chickamauga. In the fall of 1863, Josey was detached on recruiting duty and ordered by the Confederate Secretary of War to report to General Edmund Kirby Smith. He was wounded and captured at the St. Francis River, Arkansas, on February 14, 1864, and spent most of the remainder of the war as a prisoner of war at Camp Chase, Ohio.
    He died prematurely, possibly of yellow fever, in Osceola, Florida, in October 1866 and was buried in Elmwood Cemetery, Memphis, Tennessee.
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    Reuben Kay was born in Dover, Tennessee, in 1838. At the age of 14, he entered the Kentucky Military Institute in Frankfort, graduating in 1858. He then joined his family in St. Joseph, Missouri.
    In 1861, Kay joined the Missouri State Guard and served as an aide to Colonel John Taylor Hughes, commander of the 1st Infantry Regiment, 4th Division, at Wilson’s Creek on August 10, 1861.
    Later in the war, Kay served as adjutant of the 7th Missouri Cavalry (C.S.), and became assistant adjutant general on the staff of General M. Jeff Thompson. In August 1863 he was captured in Randolph County, Arkansas, and was sent to prison camps in Alton, Illinois, St. Louis, and Johnson’s Island, Ohio, before being paroled in early 1865.
    After the war he returned to St. Joseph, but finding it changed, he moved to Frankfort, Tennessee, and went into the dry goods business.
    Rueben Kay died of pneumonia on December 18, 1883, at the age of 44.

    http://ozarkscivilwar.org/photographs/
     

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  3. AUG351

    AUG351 2nd Lieutenant

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    Regimental photos

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    Camp photograph of the 13th Illinois Infantry, also known as “Fremont’s Grey Hounds,” at Helena, Arkansas; while the photograph is undated, the 13th Illinois was camped at Helena from July through December 1862. The trees in the background indicate the photograph may have been taken that fall. The 13th Illinois left Helena to participate in the attack on Chickasaw Bayou, north of Vicksburg, Mississippi that December. The unsuccessful assault resulted in heavy losses, including the regiment’s colonel, John B. Wyman.
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    Located on the north side of St. Louis, Benton Barracks was one of the most important Union Army training camps in Missouri during the Civil War. The 150-acre complex was established in 1861, and contained barracks, warehouses, and numerous other buildings. A number of Missouri Union regiments were organized there, including some of the state’s African-American units. Soon after the war, the camp was closed and nothing remains of the wartime home of thousands of Federal soldiers. Pictured in this photograph is the 2nd Wisconsin Cavalry.
    The 2nd Wisconsin Cavalry was organized at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, from December 30, 1861 through March 10, 1862, and mustered into service under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Nicholas H. Dale. The regiment was attached to the Army of the Frontier.
    The regiment participated in the sieges of Vicksburg and Jackson, Mississippi.
    The 2nd was mustered out of federal service at Austin, Texas, on November 15, 1865, and disbanded on December 14, 1865, at Madison, Wisconsin
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    Colonel Josiah W. Bissell’s “Engineer Regiment of the West” was mustered into service in the fall of 1861. The regiment contained men from Missouri, Illinois, Michigan, and Iowa. Bissell’s Engineers contributed to Union battlefield victories early in the war, such as New Madrid, Island No. 10, and Corinth. They repaired and built railroads and bridges in Tennessee and Mississippi through 1862 and 1863. In early 1864 Bissell’s Engineer Regiment was consolidated with the 25th Missouri Infantry to form the 1st Missouri Engineers. The regiment took part in the Atlanta Campaign, Sherman’s “March to the Sea,” and the Carolinas Campaign. Unfortunately no specific company designation exists for this image.
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    On the morning of May 4, 1861, a company of Arkansas State Troops known as the Hempstead Rifles prepared to leave for the Civil War. Standing in front of the Jones Hotel in Washington, Arkansas, the men of Company B were given a flag in a presentation ceremony. That afternoon, accompanied by the town’s band, the Rifles marched away, eventually joining Brigadier General Benjamin McCulloch’s Western Army and fighting at Wilson’s Creek on August 10, 1861. Mustered out shortly after the battle, many of the company’s members re-enlisted in other Confederate units.

    http://ozarkscivilwar.org/photographs/
     
  4. Roland

    Roland Sergeant

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    Thanks For Posting!
     
  5. AUG351

    AUG351 2nd Lieutenant

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    [​IMG]
    Zimri Barber Bates, a native of New York and a farmer in Sangamon County, Illinois in 1860, listed his residence as Elkhart, Logan County, Illinois when he joined Company G, 10th Illinois Cavalry in November 1861. Commissioned a first lieutenant, Bates was promoted to captain of the company in 1862. The regiment saw extensive service in the Trans-Mississippi Theater, including the skirmish at Cotton Plant, Arkansas in July 1862, the capture of Arkansas Post in January 1863, and the capture of Little Rock in September 1863. In January 1865, the veterans and recruits of the regiment were consolidated with the soldiers of the 15th Illinois Cavalry and designated the 10th Illinois Veteran Volunteer Cavalry.
    Bates died in Blackwell, Oklahoma, in February 1917.
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    Francis Bennett enlisted in Company G, 4th Iowa Infantry at Mt. Ayr, Iowa, on July 4, 1861, and mustered into federal service at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri, on August 15, 1861. On February 11, 1863 he was promoted to lieutenant. After the war, Bennett applied for an invalid pension, claiming he was wounded in the right knee at the Battle of Bentonville, North Carolina, on March 19-21, 1865, although examining doctors failed to find evidence of any wound.
    The 4th Iowa Infantry fought at Pea Ridge, Fort Hindman (Arkansas Post), the Siege of Vicksburg, the Siege of Jackson, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Jonesboro, and Bentonville. The regiment was mustered out of service on July 26, 1865.
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    David Alexander, age twenty-two, enlisted on June 15, 1861, in Company G, 1st Arkansas Mounted Rifles, at Fort Smith, Arkansas. The next day he was elected a second lieutenant. Shortly afterward, Alexander fatally stabbed one of his enlisted men in an altercation and was cashiered from the army.
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    John B. Clark Jr. was born on January 14, 1831, in Fayette, Missouri; he attended the Fayette Academy and Missouri University. He then spent two years in California before traveling east to attend Harvard Law School. Returning to Fayette, he established a law practice.
    When the Civil War started, Clark joined the Missouri State Guard as a captain; promoted to major, he fought at Carthage, Wilson’s Creek (where he was wounded) and Lexington. Promoted to colonel and given command of the 3rd Division, Missouri State Guard, he led the division at the Battle of Pea Ridge. After participating in several other battles, Clark was promoted to brigadier general in 1864, and took part in General Sterling Price’s raid through Missouri.
    After the war, Clark was elected to Congress, where he served from 1873 until 1883, and became clerk of the House of Representatives. He was a lawyer in Washington, D.C., from 1889 until his death on September 7, 1903.
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    George W. Maddox was born in Missouri in 1831; in the 1860 census he is listed as a farmer residing in Big Cedar, Jackson County, Missouri. In January 1862, Maddox, along with Charles Fletcher “Fletch” Taylor and others, joined Quantrill’s band as some of the guerrilla chieftain’s earliest recruits. He participated in the Battle of Pleasant Hill, Missouri (July 11, 1862), the raid on Lawrence, Kansas, (August 21, 1863), the massacre at Baxter Springs, Kansas (October 6, 1863) and the Centralia, Missouri Massacre (September 27, 1864). At the Battle of Pleasant Hill his horse was shot out from under him and he was wounded in both lungs. During the raid on Lawrence, Maddox served as Quantrill’s chief scout.
    On November 18, 1863, a Douglas County, Kansas grand jury issued indictments against Maddox and others involved in the Lawrence Raid. After the war, he was apprehended and transferred to Lawrence on February 8, 1866. His trial was moved to Ottawa, Kansas, however, on a change of venue, and he was acquitted. Before anyone realized what was happening, Maddox sneaked out the back of the courthouse where his wife was waiting with a horse, and they made their way back to Missouri. George Maddox was the only guerrilla to stand trial for the Lawrence Raid. Moving to Nevada, Missouri, after the war, Maddox worked for the railroad for a period of time. In 1897, he became a guard at the Missouri State Penitentiary at Jefferson City, Missouri.
    Maddox reportedly died in Arkansas on January 4, 1901 and was buried by Confederate veterans
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    Joseph Shelby was born in Lexington, Kentucky in 1830, where he was raised and attended Transylvania College; in 1852 he moved to Missouri where he became one of the richest young men in the state as a hemp farmer, rope manufacturer, and steamboat owner.
    In 1854, he returned to Kentucky, where he recruited a company of pro-slavery cavalry to fight in Kansas against the Free-soil forces. When the Civil War broke out, Shelby was called to St. Louis by his cousin, Congressman Frank Blair, who offered him a captain’s commission in the U.S. Army. Shelby refused to join the Union forces, however, and accepted a commission as a captain in the Missouri State Guard. He recruited and outfitted a company of pro-Southern mounted rangers in Lafayette County and joined General Sterling Price.
    After participating in the battles of Carthage, Wilson’s Creek, Lexington, and Pea Ridge, Shelby entered Confederate service. He recruited a cavalry regiment, and, with the rank of colonel, led a cavalry brigade during the Prairie Grove campaign.
    Shelby led an impressive, lengthy raid through Missouri in the fall of 1863, an act that won him promotion to brigadier general, and served with distinction in the repulse of Frederick Steele’s Camden Expedition in southern Arkansas in the spring of 1864. That fall, Shelby led his “Iron Brigade” in Price’s Missouri Raid, and saved Price’s army from disaster at the Battle of Westport.
    When the war ended, Shelby and his men decided to leave the United States. Sinking their battle flag in the Rio Grande River, they crossed into Mexico and established the Colony of Carlotta. Shelby returned to Missouri in 1867, where he became a key figure in helping heal the wounds of the Civil War. In 1892, President Grover Cleveland appointed him the U. S. Marshal of the Western District of Missouri, a position he held until his death from pneumonia on February 13, 1897.
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    Stand Watie was born on December 12, 1806, in Oothcloga (near present day Rome, Georgia). Degadoga, or “He Stands,” was given the name Isaac S. Watie by his parents; he later dropped his Christian name and became known as Stand Watie. At age twenty-two he acquired a license to practice law and procured a job as clerk of the Cherokee Supreme Court.
    During the secession crisis in the Indian Territory, Watie organized a secret group of supporters of Southern rights known as the Knights of the Golden Circle. At the start of the Civil War, his followers actively worked to bring the Cherokee tribe into the Confederate camp. On July 12, 1861, Watie received a colonel’s commission in the Confederate army. He raised a regiment of 300 mixed bloods and proceeded toward the northeastern border with Kansas to guard against a possible Federal invasion. On October 7, 1861, Watie’s regiment was mustered into the Confederate military service as the Cherokee Mounted Rifles.
    Watie’s regiment preformed relatively well at the Battle of Pea Ridge on March 7-8, 1862. After Pea Ridge, the Cherokee officer and his regiment participated in numerous conventional battles and skirmishes with Federal troops. On May 6, 1864, Watie was promoted to brigadier general, the only Native American to hold that rank in the Confederate army.
    Perhaps Watie’s greatest military accomplishments occurred in the summer and fall of 1864. On June 15, 1864, Watie captured the Federal steamboat J. R. Williams on the Arkansas River, loaded with $100,000 worth of supplies; on September 19, 1864, at the Second Battle of Cabin Creek, Watie and his men captured a 300 wagon Federal supply train containing $1.5 million worth of supplies.
    General Stand Watie finally surrendered his command on June 23, 1865, becoming the last Confederate general to capitulate. He died on September 9, 1871.

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  6. Robtweb1

    Robtweb1 2nd Lieutenant Retired Moderator Civil War Photo Contest
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  7. Missouri 1st

    Missouri 1st Sergeant

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    The hardest men in the Nation came from Missouri, Texas and Louisiana.
     
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  8. AUG351

    AUG351 2nd Lieutenant

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    [​IMG]
    Born in May 1832 near Warrensburg, Missouri, Jeremiah Vardman Cockrell joined the Missouri State Guard when the Civil War began, and served as an officer in the 8th Division at the battles of Carthage, Wilson’s Creek and Lexington.
    He was commissioned a captain in the 5th Missouri Battalion in early 1862, but retired when that unit was reorganized. Appointed a colonel of a partisan ranger regiment, Cockrell led his men at the fierce Battle of Lone Jack, Missouri, in August 1862. He was not reelected when that unit reorganized. Cockrell then recruited a force of Confederates and accompanied General Sterling Price on his raid through Missouri in 1864.
    Cockrell was wounded in the arm during a skirmish in Jasper County, Missouri. Following the war, he moved to Texas, but was unable to use his arm for several years until the “Minie” ball was finally removed. He kept the bullet in a snuff box as a souvenir until his death on March 18, 1915.
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    James “Dick” Liddell was a member of William Clarke Quantrill’s Confederate guerilla band during the Civil War. In this photo, Liddell is wearing a mounted services jacket, most likely taken from a Union soldier. Quantrill and his guerrillas harassed Union soldiers, raided pro-Union towns, and scored several dramatic and devastating victories, such as the raid on Lawrence, Kansas on August 21, 1863, and the massacre of General James Blunt’s command two months later at Baxter Springs, Kansas.
    In 1874 Liddell was convicted of horse stealing and served three and a half years in the Missouri State Penitentiary. In 1879 he joined the Frank and Jesse James gang for their robbery of the Glendale Missouri bank. In 1881, Liddell was arrested, tried, and found guilty for the robbery of a U.S. paymaster. Released from custody, he testified against Frank James when the famous outlaw was tried in Gallatin, Missouri, for the murder of a passenger during a train robbery. Following the trial, Liddell went to New Mexico, traveled to New Jersey, and was finally arrested in Missouri in 1891 for the 1881 murder of Wood Hite, another member of the James gang and perhaps Jesse’s closest friend.
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    Alexander A. Lesueur, born on November 25, 1842, participated in the “Southwest Expedition” (the Missouri State Militia expedition to the Kansas-Missouri border in the winter of 1860-61).
    According to the 1881 History of Lafayette County, he enlisted in Captain Joseph M. Kelly’s Washington Blues company of Missouri State Militia on May 8, 1861, and served with that company at the battles of Boonville, Carthage, Wilson’s Creek, and Lexington. Other sources state as a private in Company G, 1st Infantry, Missouri State Militia, he was captured by Captain Nathaniel Lyon’s forces at Camp Jackson (St. Louis) on May 10, 1861.
    Lesueur served as sergeant major of the 1st Light Artillery Battalion, 6th Division, which was mustered into service at Cassville, Missouri, in November 1861. After fighting at Pea Ridge, the unit was reorganized for Confederate service. Lesueur was promoted to second lieutenant and first lieutenant in what became known as Gorham’s Battery, and, after Gorham was replaced on November 10, 1862, Tilden’s Missouri Battery.
    Although held in reserve at the Battle of Prairie Grove, the battery saw combat the following July during the Battle of Helena. There, Lesueur lead 32 of his artillerymen (serving as infantrymen) in an attack on the Federal position on Graveyard Hill. Thirteen of the battery’s members became casualties in the action.
    While in winter quarters in 1863, the artillerymen refused all duties until they were allowed to elect their own officers; on December 18, 1863, Lesueur was elected captain.
    In April 1864, Lesueur’s Battery went to Louisiana and participated in the Red River campaign, only to return to Arkansas to pursue General Frederick Steele’s Union army in his retreat from Camden to Little Rock; afterwards the Missourians occupied camps in Arkansas and Louisiana until the end of the war. They disbanded and were paroled on June 9, 1865.
    On November 19, 1864, the battery’s name was changed to the 3rd Missouri Field Artillery.
    Following the war, Lesueur settled in Lexington, Missouri, where he edited a newspaper and served in the Missouri legislature; in 1888 he was elected secretary of state, and was reelected in 1892 and 1896. He died in Burbank, California, in January 1924.
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    John Jarrette joined William Clarke Quantrill’s guerrillas in October 1861. He was with Quantrill during the raid on Lawrence, Kansas, on August 21, 1863, and with William Anderson during the massacre at Centralia, Missouri, on September 27, 1864. After the war, Jarrette joined the Jesse James gang, and was a suspect in the robbery of the bank at Russellville, Kentucky, on March 21, 1868.
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    George Gibbs was born in Burke County, North Carolina, in 1838. In 1849 his family moved to Scott County, Missouri. Gibbs served six months in a Missouri State Guard cavalry regiment before joining an artillery unit (likely Captain Winston’s Company, Tennessee Light Artillery at New Madrid, Missouri); following the surrender of Island No. 10, Gibbs was taken prisoner and sent to Camp Douglas in Chicago. In 1863 he was paroled, moved to Sparta, Illinois, and resumed his trade as a carpenter, although he returned to Missouri in 1869 and settled in Bollinger County.
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    James C. Gorham, born in Callaway County, Missouri in 1834, organized a Missouri State Guard artillery battery in November 1861 and served with the unit at the Battle of Pea Ridge the following March. After the Confederate defeat at Pea Ridge, Gorham accompanied the rest of the Army of the West across the Mississippi River to Memphis, Tennessee. The battery participated in the siege of Corinth, Mississippi, and then transferred back across the Mississippi as part of Brigadier General Mosby M. Parsons’ command. Gorham and the members of his battery mustered into Confederate service in September 1862, but for some unknown reason, Major General Thomas Hindman replaced Gorham as its commander.
    Following the Confederate surrender, Gorham went to Mexico, but soon returned to the United States and opened a wholesale grocery business.
    He died in Dallas, Texas, in 1909.

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  9. Nathanb1

    Nathanb1 Brigadier General Moderator Forum Host

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    This is better than cotton candy at the State Fair. Awesome!!!! Thank you so much.
     
  10. JWheeler331

    JWheeler331 First Sergeant

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    Great posts.
     
  11. 20thncarolina

    20thncarolina Corporal

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    Really outstanding posts thanks ! Now, more please .
     
  12. AUG351

    AUG351 2nd Lieutenant

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    Now if only I could get some State Fair cotton candy for posting this haha
    More is on the way :wink:
     
  13. AUG351

    AUG351 2nd Lieutenant

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    [​IMG]
    Born in Tennessee on February 22, 1835, William M. Hogsett moved with his family to Texas at the age of 16 and settled in Hopkins County. His father died in 1846 while serving in the Mexican-American War.
    On May 10, 1862, Hopkins joined Captain S.A. Minter’s Company K, Richard Waterhouse, Jr.’s Regiment of Texas Volunteers, which subsequently became the 19th Texas Infantry. He served with his company until May 1863, when he was “left sick at Monroe, La,” and was listed as absent without leave from October 16, 1863 to February 17, 1864, when he returned to duty by order of General William R. Scurry.
    The 19th fought at the Battle of Milliken’s Bend, Louisiana, on June 7, 1863, then, in 1864, participated in stopping the advance of Union General Nathaniel Banks up the Red River and pursuing General Frederick Steele’s Union force from Camden to Little Rock. Company K was then detached to Marshall, Texas, for guard duty.
    Following the war, Hogsett returned to farming and died on September 12, 1913, in Hopkins County. He is buried in Pine Forest Cemetery.
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    Born in the Choctaw Agency, Indian Territory (Oklahoma) on November 22, 1835, Francis “Frank” Crawford Armstrong was commissioned a second lieutenant in the 2nd U. S. Dragoons in June 1855. Promoted to captain in the spring of 1861, Armstrong led his company of dragoons at the Battle of First Bull Run on July 21, 1861. He resigned for the U. S. Army the following month and joined General Benjamin McCulloch’s Confederate forces in Arkansas.
    Armstrong saw a great deal of combat during the remainder of the war. He served as an aide to Colonel James McIntosh in the Indian Territory in late 1861 and early 1862, and served with General McCulloch during the Pea Ridge campaign. After McCulloch’s death at Pea Ridge, he accompanied General Earl Van Dorn to the other side of Mississippi and was named colonel of the 3rd Louisiana Infantry. In July 1862, Armstrong was appointed acting brigadier general by Sterling Price and given command of all cavalry units in the Army of the West. He led a cavalry brigade at the Battle of Thompson’s Station, Tennessee in March 1863, and after being promoted to brigadier general the following month, took command of a brigade in General Nathan Bedford Forrest’s cavalry division. He led a division at the Battle of Chickamauga, Georgia, a brigade during the Atlanta Campaign, and helped cover the retreat of John Bell Hood’s Army of Tennessee after the Battle of Nashville. His last action was at Selma, Alabama in April 1865; he surrendered the following month.
    Following the war Armstrong served as United States Indian Inspector and Assistant Commissioner of Indian Affairs.
    Armstrong died in Bar Harbor, Maine, in 1909.
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    Post-Civil War photograph of Samuel H. Gunter, Company I, 1st Cherokee Mounted Rifles, Gunter, a native of the Cherokee Nation, enlisted in the Cherokee Nation as a second lieutenant in Stand Watie’s Regiment on July 2, 1861. An inscription on the back of the photograph reads, “Capt. Sam Gunter, noted Cherokee Bushwhacker.”Watie and his troops were active in the Indian Territory, fighting at Pea Ridge, Prairie Grove, Cabin Creek, and other actions.
    After the war, Gunter served as the sheriff of the Sequoyah District of the Indian Territory.
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    John T. Hughes was born in 1817, near Versailles, Kentucky; his family moved to Missouri in 1820. He graduated from Bonne Femme College and taught school in the Clay County, Missouri, area until the start of the Mexican-American War. He then enlisted in the 1st Regiment Missouri Mounted Volunteers and became the regiment’s historian, authoring the best-selling work, Doniphan’s Expedition, published in 1847.
    With the start of the Civil War, Hughes was commissioned a colonel in General Sterling Price’s Missouri State Guard. At Wilson’s Creek he led a reported seven charges against Federal positions on Bloody Hill. After fighting at the siege of Lexington in September 1861, Hughes led a brigade at the Battle of Pea Ridge the following March.
    Sent to Missouri to recruit a brigade in late summer 1862, Hughes was killed at the Battle of Independence, Missouri, on August 11, 1862. He was buried in Independence.
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    Emmett MacDonald practiced law in St. Louis and joined the Missouri Volunteer Militia in the First Military District (St. Louis) under the command of Brigadier General Daniel Frost before the Civil War. In November 1860, Frost received orders from Missouri Governor Robert Stewart to restore order along the Missouri border from raiding parties of Kansas Jayhawkers. MacDonald and approximately 650 militiamen from St. Louis and Jefferson City traveled to Fort Scott, Kansas and then Vernon County, Missouri to patrol the region.
    MacDonald returned to St. Louis sometime in late April 1861. He was then captured by Nathaniel Lyon at Camp Jackson on May 10, 1861. He refused parole, but was eventually released by the court system. MacDonald then joined the Missouri State Guard and participated in the battles of Carthage, Wilson’s Creek, and Lexington. He joined the 3rd Battery, Missouri Light Artillery in October 1861, when it was organized from various units of the Missouri State Guard near Osceola, Missouri; the battery was mustered into Confederate service on January 28, 1862.
    At the Battle of Pea Ridge, the battery, under the command of Captain MacDonald, fired over 700 artillery rounds before being forced to retreat; the unit also saw action at the siege of Corinth, Mississippi. The 3rd Battery was reorganized on September 10, 1862, and a new captain was elected when MacDonald failed to return to the unit (he had been authorized to recruit a cavalry regiment in the Trans-Mississippi Theater).
    By November 1862, then Colonel MacDonald had recruited five companies and organized them into a cavalry battalion. After participating in the fighting at Cane Hill and Prairie Grove, Arkansas, MacDonald’s Battalion joined Gen. John S. Marmaduke’s raid into Missouri. The command fought at Springfield on January 8, and three days later at Hartville, Missouri. Colonel MacDonald was killed by a Minie bullet to the left thigh while leading a charge at Hartville, and was later buried in Bellefontaine Cemetery in St. Louis.
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    Joseph Birtley Wright, a minister and native of Randolph County, Missouri, was a resident of Pettis County when he enlisted in the Confederate army on January 1, 1862, in Springfield, Missouri. He served as a private in Company G, 5th Missouri Infantry and participated in several actions, then was promoted to chaplain of the 1st Missouri Cavalry in 1863. In 1864, he is listed in official records as chaplain of General Francis M. Cockrell’s First Missouri Brigade.
    “Lizzie accept this as a token of esteem and fidelity from J. B. Wright” is written on the back of the photograph. No further information is available on the identity of Lizzie.
    The 1st Missouri Cavalry was organized on December 30, 1861, with the majority of its members transferring from the Missouri State Guard. They fought at Pea Ridge and Vicksburg, where they surrendered on July 4, 1863; in September 1863 they were considered exchanged and re-entered the Confederate army by consolidating with the 3rd Missouri Cavalry.
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    Captain Alexander Banks (left) served as provost marshal of the Southern District of Kansas in 1863, and in that role negotiated with Confederate guerrilla leader William Clarke Quantrill for the surrender of the Eldridge Hotel during the raid on Lawrence, Kansas in August 1863.
    Arthur Gunther of Lawrence, Kansas (on right), entered Company D of the 2nd Kansas Infantry as a first sergeant in May 1861; he fought at the Battle of Wilson’s Creek and was mustered out with the regiment in October 1861. In March 1862 he re-entered the army as captain of Company H, 2nd Kansas Cavalry, and was mustered out in March 1865 at Little Rock, Arkansas. Gunther died on May 25, 1909.
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    Henry Bishop of Chicago enlisted and was mustered into Company E, 7th Kansas Cavalry, also known as “Jennison’s Jayhawkers,” on August 4, 1861; he was promoted to sergeant on October 18, 1861. The 7th Kansas Cavalry was organized at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, on October 28, 1861, and fought in the 1862 battles of Iuka and Corinth, and in the 1864 battles of Little Blue River, Independence, Byram’s Ford, and Mine Creek.
    Bishop was mustered out of service along with the regiment on September 29, 1865.
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    James Blake enlisted in the 4th Missouri State Militia Cavalry in January 1862, in Dallas County, Missouri; the 4th MSM was formally organized on April 28, 1862. They assisted in the withdrawal of Union troops from the 1862 Battle of Newtonia, but most of their duties consisted of guarding railroads and conducting anti-guerrilla patrols in central Missouri. During 1864 they were involved in the pursuit of Sterling Price through western Missouri, fighting at Little Blue, Independence, Westport, and Mine Creek.
    Blake was mustered out with the regiment in April 1865.
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    Thomas Blanchard, a native of Perry County, Indiana, and a millwright by trade, enlisted in the 7th Missouri Cavalry in December 1861 at Macon City for three years. He served as a duty sergeant and company quartermaster sergeant. Re-enlisting in 1864, he transferred to the 1st Missouri Cavalry when the 7th and 1st were consolidated in early 1865. He mustered out of the 1st Missouri on September 1, 1865, as a first sergeant. Blanchard applied for a federal pension in 1880, but details of his later life are unknown.
    The 7th participated in the Battle of Prairie Grove, the campaign to capture Little Rock, and Frederick Steele’s Camden Expedition.
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    A native of Indiana, William Catt was a resident of Grasshopper Falls (Valley Falls), Jefferson County, Kansas, when he enlisted in Company I, 11th Kansas Cavalry in September 1862. Catt spent the next year and a half guarding the eastern border of Kansas; he was discharged in March 1864 because of disease. Returning to the service in the 17th Kansas Infantry in July 1864, Catt served until he was discharged that November. Tragically, Catt’s wife died while he was away in the army, and his son (who also served in the 11th Kansas Cavalry) died in 1865.
    Catt died in 1904 and is buried next to his son in the Farrar Cemetery in Valley Falls, Kansas.


    http://ozarkscivilwar.org/photographs/
     
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  14. Georgia Sixth

    Georgia Sixth First Sergeant

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    That is mighty high praise and I wholeheartedly agree.
     
  15. CMWinkler

    CMWinkler Brigadier General Moderator Forum Host

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    Magnificent thread. Thanks.
     
  16. Georgia Sixth

    Georgia Sixth First Sergeant

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    I would also add Iowa and Kansas. I believe the Iowans paid more proportionately in the fight to preserve the Union than any other Federal state.
     
  17. Missouri 1st

    Missouri 1st Sergeant

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    No doubt they were. Anything west of the Mississippi was the wild west and life was hard without a war. But it was the dirty war within a war that made men and women in Missouri particularly tough.

    The few men from Colorado are mentioned as being "respected" and feared for their raw methods.
     
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  18. Georgia Sixth

    Georgia Sixth First Sergeant

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    Yep, there were noticeably few prisoner camps this side of the big river.
     

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