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Slave pictures

Discussion in 'Civil War Photography' started by Diana9, Mar 22, 2012.

  1. Diana9

    Diana9 2nd Lieutenant

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  3. tmh10

    tmh10 Major

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    Good picture. First time I have seen it. That is two pictures on the board today I hadn't seen. Love the pictures.
     
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  4. Diana9

    Diana9 2nd Lieutenant

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    [​IMG]
    Auction & Negro Sales: 1864

    "Whitehall Street, Atlanta, 1864. This photo of a black Union soldier posted at a slave auction house in Atlanta is one of hundreds taken by George N. Barnard during Gen. Sherman's occupation of the city in the fall of 1864. Many were destroyed in the conflagration that erupted upon Sherman's firing of Confederate munitions stores when he departed on Nov. 15."

    Notice, he's reading a book.
     
  5. tmh10

    tmh10 Major

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    With Sherman in town, it was probaby a book on firefighting.
     
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  6. Diana9

    Diana9 2nd Lieutenant

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    Advertisement: "Sale of Negroes, Mills, Mules, and Hogs."

    [​IMG]

    Negroes, mules, hogs - same category.

    “There are few, I believe, in this enlightened age, who will not acknowledge that slavery as an institution is a moral and political evil." - Robert E. Lee

    Did he say this before, during, or after the war?
     
  7. Diana9

    Diana9 2nd Lieutenant

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  8. Diana9

    Diana9 2nd Lieutenant

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    [​IMG]

    Bucks and Wenches?

    Removed link to site due to its content
    posted as Mod
     
  9. Diana9

    Diana9 2nd Lieutenant

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    Richmond Slaves

    "This is a photograph of slaves in Richmond, Virginia. The photograph appears to be taken shortly after the fall of Richmond, in April, 1865. The picture appears to be of a family, but only men and children are seen . . . the fate of the mother is unknown. The photograph was undoubtedly taken shortly after these people obtained their freedom. The ruins of Richmond can be seen in the background."

     
  10. DanF

    DanF First Sergeant

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    I have some slave pictures, though my wife refers to them as wedding photos.
    :cry:
     
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  11. Diana9

    Diana9 2nd Lieutenant

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    LOL. :bounce:
     
  12. tmh10

    tmh10 Major

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    I think if they paid him he would have got a new pair of pants for the picture. getting your picture taken back in those days was a big deal.
     
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  13. Republican Blues

    Republican Blues Sergeant Major

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    It wasnt as big a deal in 1915........unless you went for a studio picture. Remember, the did have battlefield photography in WWI, something they didnt have in the WBTS. Photography had made huge advances since the 1860s. The picture below would have been nothing but a blur with wetplate photography

    [​IMG]
     
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  14. ghostchaser

    ghostchaser Private

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    Uncle Alfred's CabinAlfred Jackson was born into slavery at the Hermitage around 1812. He married Gracey, another slave and seamstress on the property. He stayed on as caretaker and even tour guide following the takeover by the Ladies Hermitage Association in 1889. In 1901, he was laid to rest, at his own request, near the tomb where President & Mrs. Jackson now lie. He wanted to remain close to the President just as he had in life.
    Uncle Alfred's cabin is the only slave quarters that still remain on the Hermitage property. Following the state of Tennessee's enactment of the emancipation amendment to it's constitution in January 1865, Uncle Alfred went on living with the Jackson's for "freedom" meant nothing to him. Even when it was taken over by the LHA, he still remained and to eject him from the property was never a consideration.

    I'm sure there were others who stayed, for whatever reason.
     
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  15. henry lloyd

    henry lloyd Corporal

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    That's a very famous photo, (infamous?) and I've never seen it before with such high resolution, and so large. Excellent. Thank you.

    Henry
     
  16. Hannah

    Hannah Sergeant Major

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    Some of those pictures I had never seen before.

    :rofl:

    When Mom was alive she'd say the same thing about Dad.
     
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  17. phil1861

    phil1861 Corporal

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    Many former slaves continued on with the same work as before; briefly for pay but most who did not move on ended up as sharecroppers tending the same fields but only getting by after they owed the "store" for seed, implements, food, etc. Their lot was worse than before as former slave states had laws on the books preventing the most gregarious of sins but also it was to the benefit of the owner to ensure his property was healthy and fit. For the sharecropper there was only what was owed or be evicted.
     
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  18. donna

    donna Lt. Colonel Forum Host

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    When we visited The Hermitage, I remember the cabin and seeing Uncle Alfred's grave. If you go to Nashville The Hermitage is a must see, at least to me.

    Thanks for posting the photos.
     
  19. henry lloyd

    henry lloyd Corporal

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    That was one of the very first historic places my folks took me to when I was a kid, it's a beautiful place and I learned a lot about Jackson.

    henry
     
  20. ghostchaser

    ghostchaser Private

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    When I was a kid, I did a report on Jackson. That summer, we visited New Orleans and went to the Chalmette Battlefield. At the time, they were doing some work on their public restrooms and field lines had been dug up. I found a ball, several square head nails, a metal ring, and what appeared to be a trigger gaurd ( probably illegally). They were just scattered about.
    Later that summer, we went to the Hermitage. There was some type of construction going on there, as well, and I found a stone marble. I turned the marble in.
     
  21. ole

    ole Brev. Brig. Gen'l Retired Moderator

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    The caption editor was obviously leaning South. There were no "munitions stores" when Sherman left Atlanta. Hood fired them when he left Atlanta, causing fires that resulted in much of the burning. Sherman's men set about destroying mills and other installations of use to the Confederacy, causing further destruction in the city. That Sherman burned Atlanta is one of those cherished myths.
     

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