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My 2nd great-grandfather

Discussion in 'Researching Your Civil War Ancestry' started by djbogle, Feb 28, 2010.

  1. djbogle

    djbogle Cadet

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    P. G. Bogle was my 2nd great-grandfather. He first enlisted with the 2nd Tennesse Cavalry Regiment under Col. E. S. Smith as a Private, and after it disbanded he joined the 3rd Confederate Cavalry, Co. C, under Rufus B. Lankford (rank unknown). Pay records show that he had attained the rank of "2SGT" near the end of the war. A census record shows him in Morgan County, Alabama in 1910. I haven't found his burial site as of yet.

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  3. M E Wolf

    M E Wolf Brigadier General Moderator

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    Dear DJBogle;



    Southern Historical Society Papers.
    Vol. XXII. Richmond, Va., January-December. 1894.
    Roster Of The Medical Officers Of The Army Of Tennessee.
    BOGLE, J. M., Surgeon, June 30, '64. 3d Mississippi Regiment, Senior Surgeon Scatherston Brigade.
    (might be a relative)

    Confederate Military History, Vol. 7
    MISSISSIPPI--CHAPTER IX.
    FIRST MILITARY DISTRICT, HEADQUARTERS COLUMBUS.
    Brig.-Gen. Daniel Ruggles commanding.
    Third Mississippi battalion State troops, Maj. W. A. Hewlett; Fifth Mississippi regiment State troops, Col. H. C. Robinson; Mississippi State cavalry, companies of Capt. D. C. Gillelyn, Capt. J. E. Johnson, Capt. W. C. Martin; Mississippi State Rangers, Capt. Isham J. Warren; Second Tennessee cavalry battalion, Lieut.-Col. C. R. Barteau; Owen's and Thrall's Arkansas batteries; Rice's Tennessee heavy artillery; Hewlett's Alabama Partisan Rangers.

    KENTUCKY--CHAPTER X.

    ARMY OF KENTUCKY.
    FIRST DIVISION, BRIG.-GEN. C. L. STEVENSON.

    SECOND DIVISION, BRIGADIER-GENERAL HENRY HETH.
    First brigade, Brig.-Gen. D. Leadbetter:--Forty-third Tennessee, Col. J. W. Gillespie, Thirty-fourth Georgia, Col. J. A. W. Johnson; Fifty-sixth Georgia, Col. E. P. Watkins; Forty-third Alabama, Col. A. Gracie, Jr., Jackson's artillery, Capt. G. A. Dure.
    Second brigade, Col. W. G. M. Davis:--Sixth Florida, Col. J. J. Finley; Seventh Florida, Col. M. S. Perry; First Florida cavalry, Col. W. G. M. Davis; Marion artillery, Capt. J. M. Martin.
    First cavalry brigade, Col. Benj. Allston :--First Tennessee cavalry, Col. H. M. Ashby; Second Tennessee cavalry, Col. J. B. McLinn; Third Tennessee cavalry, Col. J. W. Starnes; First Georgia cavalry, Col. J. J. Morrison; Howitzer battery, First-Lieut. G. A. Huwald.
    Second cavalry brigade, Col. N. B. Forrest:--First Kentucky cavalry, Lieut.-Col. T. G. WoOdward; First Louisiana cavalry, Col. Jno. S. Scott; Eighth Texas cavalry, Col. J. A. Wharton.
    On the 9th of August General Bragg added to General Smith's command from his own, the brigades of Generals Cleburne and Preston Smith, forming temporarily a fourth division under Cleburne, and also Gen. T. J. Churchill's division, including the brigades of McCray and McNair, constituting the third division of General Smith's army.

    Southern Historical Society Papers
    Vol. VIII. Richmond, Oct., Nov. and Dec., 1880. Nos. 10, 11 & 12.
    General Forrest's Operations Against Smith And Grierson.
    [excerpt]
    REPORT OF GENERAL FORREST.
    Headquarters Starkville, Miss.,
    February 26, 1864.
    General, -- I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of your letter of 20th inst., and am under many obligations for the ordnance stores and train sent to Gainsville.
    I am also gratified at being able to say that your wishes in regard to the enemy's forces under Generals Smith and Grierson are realized at least to the extent of defeat and utter rout.
    We met them on Sunday morning last at Ellis's Bridge, or Succartouchee creek, three miles south of West Point, in front of which Colonel Forrest's brigade was posted to prevent the enemy from crossing. After a brisk engagement of an hour and a half the enemy retired towards West Point. It was not my intention to attack them, or bring on a general engagement, but to develop their strength, position and movements.
    I moved forward with my escort and a portion of Faulkner's Kentucky regiment and found the enemy had begun a systematic retreat, and being unwilling they should leave the country without a fight, ordered the advance of my column.
    Will forward a detailed official report as soon as reports from brigade commanders are received. It is sufficient for me to say here that with twenty five hundred men, the enemy, numbering from six to seven thousand strong, were driven from West Point to within ten miles of Pontotoc in two days; all his efforts to check our advance failed, and his forces at last flying utterly defeated and demoralized, leaving sill pieces of artillery, one hundred killed, and one hundred prisoners, and wounded estimated at three hundred or over. The seriously wounded, about fifty in number, fell into our hands. They took in their retreat every carriage, buggy, cart, and wagon along the road to move their killed and wounded officers, and all their slightly wounded -- according to report of citizens -- were moved in front with their pack train. Our loss is about twenty five killed, seventy five wounded, and probably eight or ten captured. Among the killed are my brother, Colonel Jeff. E. Forrest, commanding brigade; Lieutenant Colonel Barksdale, commanding George's regiment, and several other officers, whose names are not now remembered.
    It affords me pleasure to mention the fortitude and gallantry displayed by the troops engaged, especially the new troops from west Tennessee, who, considering their want of drill, discipline and experience, behaved handsomely, and the moral effect of their victory over the best cavalry in the Federal service, will tell in their future operations against the enemy -- inspiring them with courage and confidence in their ability to whip them again. Considering the disparity in numbers, discipline and drill, I consider it one of the most complete victories that has occurred since the war began.
    After the enemy succeeded in reaching the hills between Okalona and Pontotoc, the resistance of the enemy was obstinate, compelling me frequently to dismount my advance to drive them from favorable positions defended by the broken condition of the country. About three hundred men of the Second Tennessee cavalry, under Colonel Bartean, and the Seventh Tennessee cavalry, Colonel Duckworth, received the repeated charges of seven regiment of the enemy in open ground; drove them back time after time, finally driving them from the field, capturing three stand of colors, and another piece of their artillery. A great deal of the fighting was almost hand to hand, and the only way I can account for our small loss is, the fact that we kept so close to them that the enemy overshot our men. Owing to the broken down and exhausted condition of men and horses, and being almost out of ammunition, I was compelled to stop pursuit.
    Major General Gholson arrived during Monday night, and his command being comparatively fresh, continued the pursuit, and when last heard from, was still driving the enemy, capturing horses and prisoners. The enemy had crossed the Tallahatchie river on the night of the 23rd, burning the bridge behind them at New Albany, and retreating rapidly towards Memphis, with Gholson still in pursuit. I am, General,
    Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
    Signed N.B. Forrest, Major General.
    To Lieutenant General L. Polk.
    -----------------------------------------------------
    continued
  4. M E Wolf

    M E Wolf Brigadier General Moderator

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    Southern Historical Society Papers.
    Vol. XXII. Richmond, Va., January-December. 1894.
    Roster Of The Medical Officers Of The Army Of Tennessee.
    [excerpt]

    NISBET, H. C., Surgeon. Dec. 31, '62, 3rd Confederate Cavalry.
    [excerpt]
    THORNBERG, AMOS, Assistant Surgeon, appointed by Secretary of War to rank Oct. 24, '62. Dec. 31, '62, 3rd Confederate Cavalry. March 9, '64, ordered to report to S. H. Stout.
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Confederate Military History, Vol. 7
    ALABAMA--CHAPTER V.
    THE THIRD CONFEDERATE CAVALRY.
    The Third Confederate cavalry, which entered the service under Col. J. R. Howard, included seven Alabama companies. It served during the greater part of the war in Wheeler's cavalry, and fought throughout the campaigns in Kentucky and Tennessee in numberless raids' and skirmishes. It fought at Murfreesboro, Triune, Hoover's Gap, Chickamauga, Bridgeport, Trenton, McAfee's, Noonday Creek. After the resignation of Colonel Howard, the regiment was commanded, successively, by Col. W. N. Estes and Col. P. H. Rice. It was constantly in demand for picket duty and scouting, and was distinguished for gallantry and endurance. Colonel Estes was killed near Chattanooga, and Colonel Rice was wounded in Georgia. Lieut.-Col. John McCaskill and Capt. Dan Clayton were wounded, and Adjt. N. Roth-bock was killed, at Murfreesboro.

    EXTRACTS FROM OFFICIAL WAR RECORDS.
    Estes' Battalion, Alabama cavalry, Maj. W. N. Estes, merged into Third Confederate: Vol. X, Part 2--(573) In Leadbetter's brigade, Gen. E. Kirby Smith's army, May 31, 1862.

    Third Confederate cavalry: Vol. XVI, Part I--(889) General Maxey's report of fight near Graham's, August 30, 1862, mentions Captain Rice's company. (891) Highly commended by General Maxey. (1143) Report of Col. J. R. Howard of skirmishes near Mountain gap, October 14 to 16, 1862.

    No. 58--(349) General Thomas (Union) says, scout reports four companies of Third Confederate cavalry, in Cherokee county, February 7, 1864. (590) Hume's brigade, Kelly's division, Wheeler's cavalry corps, January 20th.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXIII/2 [S# 35]
    Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Kentucky, Middle And East Tennessee, North Alabama, And Southwest Virginia, From January 21 To August 10, 1863.
    CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE. ETC.--#1
    Bristol, Tenn.
    Maj. T. W. W. DAVIES.
    Hilliard's Legion, 1st Battalion, Company A.
    PEGRAM'S CAVALRY BRIGADE.
    Brig. Gen. JOHN PEGRAM
    1st Georgia Cavalry.
    1st Louisiana Cavalry.
    1st (Carter's) Tennessee Cavalry.
    2d (Ashby's) Tennessee Cavalry.
    16th Tennnessee Battalion.
    Huwald's battery (detachment).
    Escort, Capt. N. C. Langford.
    [excerpt]
    Kingston, Tenn.
    Col. S. J. SMITH.
    10th Confederate Cavalry.
    1st Georgia Cavalry (detachment).
    1st Tennessee Cavalry (detachment).
    Light Artillery (detachment).

    ----------------------------------------------------------------
  5. DixieRifles

    DixieRifles First Sergeant

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    I checked the Unit History files for the 2nd Tennessee Cavalry CSA. There appears to be two organizations.

    Here are notes from the NARA archivists.

    2nd Tenn Cavalry CSA
    Ashby's Cavalry

    also called 1s Tenn
    Formed from 4th & part of 5th Cav Batln
    Col H. M. Ashby
    Lt.-Col H. C. Giillespie
    Maj P. A. Cobb
    Maj Wm. M. Smith
    Lt-Col Jno H. Kuhn

    2nd Smith's Cavalry or aka 2nd Biffle's Battalion of Cavalry
    The first card refers to . . .
    10th also called 11th Tenn Cavalry battalion
    Lt-Col. E. S. Smith - to Col 2 Regt
    Maj J? Thomason
    Appears to have become Smith's 2 Regt Tenn Cav about April 1862 which was evidently
    disbanded about May 62
    Kenney's Co.
    Leas Co.
    Barkley's Co.
    Thomson's Co
    THomason's Co.
    Bars Co
    Wheelers Co
    Malones Co
    Rankins Co

    Not much there. A lot of notes that may or may not be correct. I guess some of this unit eventually became the 10th Tennessee Cavalry CSA. But it may help follow the names of this unit as it re-organized. Tracing these Tennessee cavalry units got really confusing. There is a book on Tennesseans in the War that traces the history of these units. This may explain it better.

    Steve

    Oh. I checked a few more cards. It seems the evolution of one of the companies started with 10 Tenn Cavalry and then transferred to 2nd Tenn Cav and then to the 11th Tenn Cavalry.
  6. djbogle

    djbogle Cadet

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    Gentlemen, thank you for all of the input. There are a couple of leads in them that I plan to explore in more detail.

    Here's a little of what I've gleaned from "Tennesseans in the Civil War" from the TNGen Web Project:
    "2nd (Smith's) Tennessee Cavalry Regiment - Originally 10th (also called 11th) Tennessee Cavalry Battalion-Organized as a battallion Feb 1862; increased to regiment April 1862
    Field officers - Col. E.S. Smith Lt. Col. Zachariah Thomason
    This regiment had a short life, and little is known of it. It appears to have been organized as a battalion at Camp Cheatam with eight companies which had been mustered into Confederate service between Nov., 1861 and Jan. 1862. A ninth company was added March 13, 1862, and it was constituted as a regiment in April, 1862."

    My ancestor served under Capt. Samuel P. Thompson, and after the company was dis-banded he supposedly transferred to Co. C, Third Confederate Cavalry regiment, under Capt. Rufus B. Lankford around May, 1862, somewhere close to Shellmound, TN.

    You're correct, it's kind of confusing trying to follow it all, but I reckon it must have been a pretty confusing time in history.
  7. samgrant

    samgrant Captain Retired Moderator

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    Are you saying that you have found the 2nd GGGfather that served in the war? Tell us about the other one.

    I figure we all (depending on our age) have exactly 8 great-great-grandfathers who may be of age during the Civil War.
    Some are harder to find than others.

    Good luck searching for more.

    Sam
  8. Nathanb1

    Nathanb1 Brigadier General Moderator

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    Uh...Sam? Some of us old codgers tend to have great-grandfathers who served.....You're making me feel ooooooooold.
  9. djbogle

    djbogle Cadet

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    Allow me to clarify...P.G. Bogle was my g-g-grandfather. I recently discovered that HIS father, Joseph C, Bogle, fought with the 94th Alabama Volunteer Militia. Any of you have any info on this unit?
  10. M E Wolf

    M E Wolf Brigadier General Moderator

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    General Joe Wheeler writing Alabama's Military history does not mention 94th Alabama.

    Sixty-fifth Regiment is the last. Have a lot of misc. groups.

    ------------
    Confederate Military History, Vol. 7
    ALABAMA--CHAPTER I.
    [excerpt]
    When war was declared against Mexico, thousands upon thousands of patriotic citizens of this State tendered their services to the government, but only one regiment composed entirely of Alabamians could be accepted. It was organized at Mobile in June, 1846, and designated as the First Alabama volunteers. Its officers were as follows: Col. John R. Coffee, Lieut.-Col. Richard G. Earle, Maj. Goode Bryan, Adjt. Hugh M. Watson, Capts. Sydenham Moore, Andrew P. Pickens, Hugh Cunningham, E. T. Smith, Zach Thomason, William G. Coleman, R. M. Jones, William H. Ketchum, D. P. Baldwin and J. D. Shelley. The regiment proceeded to Mexico, first served under General Pillow and afterward under General Shields. In 1847 Colonel Seibels, of Montgomery, organized a battalion; it reached Vera Cruz too late to join Scott's column, but performed garrison duty at Orizaba until the termination of hostilities. Its captains were: John G. Burr, T. E. Irby, Tennent Lomax, Blanton McAlpine and Gibbs. The Thirteenth regiment of regulars included a large number of Alabamians. Jones M. Withers, of Mobile, who graduated at West Point in 1835, was its lieutenant-colonel, and Egbert I. Jones, Hugh L. Clay and Nicholas Davis were among its officers. A small battalion commanded by Col. Phillip H. Raiford, composed of the companies of Captains Curtis, Downman and Ligon and independent companies commanded by Captains Desha, Elmore, Platt and James McGee, also volunteered and served in the war with Mexico. Of these the only cavalry company was that of Captain McGee; all the others were infantry.
    [end of excerpt]
    Confederate Military History, Vol. 7
    ALABAMA--CHAPTER V.
    THE NINTH ALABAMA CAVALRY.
    The Ninth cavalry (also called Seventh) was formed near Tullahoma, May, 1863, by consolidating Malone's and Z. Thomason's battalions. It was in Wheeler's corps during the entire war.
    It first served in Wharton's division until December, 1863, and was in many skirmishes. It was then brigaded under Morgan, Russell, Allen and Hagan, and was constantly engaged in skirmishing. It suffered severely at Shelbyville and in protecting Longstreet's corps. It was in the pursuit of Sherman during 1864 and 1865, and finally surrendered in North Carolina. There were many casualties among its officers. Col. James C. Malone was wounded in Tennessee and at Noonday Creek. Lieut.-Col. Z. Thomason, Maj. Thomas H. Malone and Capt. S. S. Clayton were captured at Shelbyville. Adjt. William H. Binford died in the service. Capt. S. P. Dobbs was wounded at Shelbyville and in Georgia. Capt. James M. Robinson was wounded and captured; Capt. John B. Floyd was wounded at Noonday Creek; Capt. William E. Thompson was wounded in Tennessee and at Calhoun; Capt. Robert W. Figg was wounded at Dover; Capt. George Mason, who commanded the regiment in the summer of 1864, was wounded at Atlanta; Capt. James M. Stevenson was killed at Dover, Capt. William E. Wayland at Rome, and Capt. James E. Nance in South Carolina.
  11. DixieRifles

    DixieRifles First Sergeant

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    I posted a reply but it was lost.

    I searched the NARA files for any BOGLE in an Alabama unit. I found an Andrew and a "J.J" who were in two units---I think the 8th and the 41st.

    I did find a Pvt. J. C. Bogle in Co. A of 94 Regiment Alabama Militia. I didn't find any info on this unit. Usually in front of the cards are Unit History cards that might list names of officers or even give a brief history of their battles. There were only 5 Unit cards. However, the files for three units were together. The units were the 89, 95, 94 and 63 Militia.

    I searched the individual records for another soldier. Sometimes the cards will have an organizational history. Didn't find any. I happened to find a "Colonel" of the 89 Militia and he had only 3 cards. The dates for some of these units are March--April 1862.

    Nothing much.

    Steve
  12. DixieRifles

    DixieRifles First Sergeant

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    I found one NARA card for Pvt P. G. Bogle listed in 2 TN Cavalry


    P. G. Bogle
    Pvt, Co. B (Capt J. F. Thomason's Co),
    2nd (Smith's) Tenn Cavalry
    Age 2? (second digit is missing)
    Muster Roll Dated Nov 4, 1864 (last digit appears as "/" so I read this as "4")
    Mustered When Nov 4, 1864
    Value of Horse $180
    No. of Miles to rendezvous 22

    History of unit (printed on bottom of card)
    This company was successively designated as Capt Thomason's Co. Tenn. Volunteers; Capt. Thomason's Co., 10th Battalion Tenn Cav; and Capt Thomason's Co., 2nd(Smith's) Regiment Tenn Cavalry.
    Lieut-Col E. S. Smith's 10th (also called 11th) Battalion Tennessee Cavalry, which consisted of 8 companies about Feb 1, 1862, and nine companies on March 14, 1862, was increased to a regiment in April, 1862, and designated the 2d (Smith's) Regt Tenn Cav. The regiment appears to have been disbanded in May 1862 and two companies subsequently served in Starnes', subsequently McLemore's 4th (also called 3d) Regt. Tenn Cavalry. Some of the officers and men are found to have subsequently served in the 19th (also called the 2d) Battalion Alabama Cavalry, which was consolidated with the 14t Battalion Alabama Partisan Rangers to form the 9th(also called the 7th) Regiment Alabama Cavalry.


    Ahh. Don't ya just love those Cavalry unit histories.

    I searched for ALL of the ALABAMA files and found the ones that I posted in earlier post.

    Steve
  13. 5fish

    5fish 2nd Lieutenant

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    I ask who was this Philmore Green......He looks to be the Minerva and Sarah Green....

    Joseph C. Bogle

    Joseph C. Bogle was born Apr. 1, 1811 in Blount Co., Tn. He married Minerva Green Feb. 25, 1834 in Blount Co., TN. Their union produced seven children: Sarah C. (b. 1836), Nancy E. (b. 1839), Philmore Green (b. 1842), Hugh C. (b. 1844), Maston (b. 1848),Minerva J. (b. 1849), Roxanne Josephine (b. 1855). The family moved to Alabama between 1844 and 1848.

    Joseph C. Bogle served with the 94th Regiment, Alabama Volunteer Militia. He died Apr. 10, 1865. Considering the date of his death, and the lack of burial details, one would assume that he died during the Civil War.

    (Philmore) Green Bogle

    Green Bogle was born July, 1842 in Bradley Co., TN. His occupation is listed as “farmer”. He married Marie Unknown in AL about 1860. Their union produced five children: Mastin (b. 1868), Robert (b. 1870), Evaline (b. 1873), Andrew (b. 1880), Addie (b. 1882). All children were born in AL.

    Green served in the 2nd Regiment, Tennessee Cavalry (Smith’s Brigade). He died in 1916 in Morgan Co., AL.

    Look at this family history....

    129. Ake HENRY (James HENRY3, James HENRY2, Samuel HENRY1) was born 23 JUN 1808 in Blount Co. TN, and died 16 MAY 1871 in Bradley Co. Tn. He was buried in Fort Hill Cem, Cleveland, TN. He married Sarah Bewley GREEN 15 MAR 1836 in Blount Co. TN, daughter of Philmer GREEN and Sarah BEWLEY. She was born 31 JUL 1815 in Blount Co. TN, and died 12 OCT 1880 in McLennan Co. TX. She was buried in Cox Cemetery, McLennan Co. TX.

    Children of Ake HENRY and Sarah Bewley GREEN are:
    + 648 i. Philmore Green HENRY was born 19 DEC 1836 in Tennessee, and died 20 DEC 1905 in McLennan Co. TX.
    649 ii. James H. HENRY was born 1838 in Blount Co. TN.
    + 650 iii. William Harrison HENRY was born 1841 in Blount Co. TN.
    651 iv. Martin C. HENRY was born ABT. 1843 in Tennessee, and died AFT. 1880 in TX.
    652 v. Neoma J. HENRY was born 1845 in Tennessee.
    653 vi. Sarah Caroline HENRY was born 26 MAR 1848 in Bradley Co. TN, and died 23 NOV 1857 in Cleveland, Bradley Co. TN.


    I just thought you might find this interesting....
  14. M E Wolf

    M E Wolf Brigadier General Moderator

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    DixieRifles, sir;

    Wonderful work sir!

    Well done!

    Respectfully submitted,
    M. E. Wolf
  15. DixieRifles

    DixieRifles First Sergeant

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  16. 5fish

    5fish 2nd Lieutenant

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    Here another look at the 2nd TN Cavalry's history.... Does it match up with those cards you use?...

    2nd Regiment, Tennessee Cavalry (Smith's)
    2nd (Smith's) Cavalry Regiment [also called 10th or 11th Battalion] was organized in February, 1862, with eight companies. During April its numbers had increased to regimental strength. The unit served in the Department of East Tennessee, but was soon mustered out of service. Two companies were transferred to the 4th (Starnes') Tennessee Cavalry Regiment and some of the men joined Alabama commands. Colonel E. S. Smith and Lieutenant Colonel Zachariah Thomason were in command.
  17. 5fish

    5fish 2nd Lieutenant

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    Here some more or the Person who P. G. Bogle is named after...............

    Philmer GREEN was born on 5 April 1775 in Albermarle Par, Amelia Co Va. He died on 21 November 1851 in Blount Co, Tn. He was buried in Logan's Chapel, Wildewood, Blount Co, Tn.

    In the 1830 Slave Schedules for Blount Co, Tn, he had 14 slaves listed.

    Found this in "Missouri Pioneers Vol 5, July 1969, page 4. Records were abstractedfrom the St. Louis Christian Advocate published by the Methodist Episcopal Church South at St. Louis, MO beginning August 1851.Philmore Green died in Blount Co, Tenn., Nov. 21, 1851. Born in Amelia Co., VA, in 1775. Moved with his father to E. Tenn. (Hawkins Co.) when he was quite young. In 1807, married Miss Sarah Bewley.
    In the 1830 Slave Schedules for Blount Co, Tn, he had 14 slaves listed.
  18. johnrigdon

    johnrigdon Cadet

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    When tracing men and units there is no guarantee at all that a man joined up with others from his area and were called by the "state" name. Particularly in the border states there are A LOT of men who joined up with other units in other states. There were at least 4,000 men who went from Georgia to Mississippi and joined Mississippi units early in the war because Gov. Brown of Georgia refused to allow Georgia men to enlist for the Confederacy. My ggrandfather who had left South Carolina a generation earlier for the Dahlonegha Gold Rush returned to serve in a South Carolina unit. Booth's "Record of Louisiana Confederate Soldiers" which is one of the best documented soldier record collections contains hundreds - perhaps thousands of men who were not from Louisiana, but were from Mississippi, Texas, Tennessee, Arkansas, and Florida.

    Before starting to study West Virginia I assumed that most all the men from the area were yankees, but in fact there were probably more men from West Virginia who joined Virginia units and at least two regiments of Kentucky men were from West Virginia. The "Loyal West Virginia" statement is largely a myth due to political influence than allegiance of the people to the Union.

    The point is, if you don't find him in your home state, you gotta chase them all down until you find him. Most every man from 15 to 50 served in one way or another.

    John Rigdon
    ResearchOnLine
    http://www.researchonline.net
  19. larry_cockerham

    larry_cockerham Southern Gentleman, Lest We Forget, 2011

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    Remember/notice that the 2nd Tennessee operated in an area where MS and TN units traveled back and forth along the Tennesssee river in northern Alabama and into northern MS. This was the territory of the Wheeler, Roddy and Forrest cavalries and a BUNCH of small infantry regiments that became smaller and consolidated often as numbers dwindled. Folks in the southern counties of Tennessee such as Wayne, Lawrence, Giles often formed regiments with men from Lauderdale Co. AL as well as the Mississippi counties. The river was a bit of an obstacle so folks on the north side were likely to have friends and relatives in Tennessee. I hope this ain't as confusing as it felt when I typed it. Many of the men of the 2nd TN Inf are buried in Rest Haven cemetery in Franklin.
  20. djbogle

    djbogle Cadet

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    Just a note...I recently learned that P.G.'s brother, Hugh C. Bogle, also served in the 3rd Cavalry. Hugh C. Bogle is buried in Lebanon Cemetery near Ft. Payne, AL along with my g-g-g-grandfather, Joseph C. Bogle.
  21. djbogle

    djbogle Cadet

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    Another find; P.G. Bogle was buried in Reeves Cemetery near Hartsele, AL in 1916. He and my g-g-grandmother were living there with their daughter. Unfortunately, they are in unmarked graves. I am presently searching for a plot map of the cemetery.

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