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Discussion in 'New Recruits Meet & Greet Area' started by realevergreen, Mar 5, 2011.

  1. realevergreen

    realevergreen Private

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    Hello, I've been reading for some time here and, now, finally registered. Although from IL, most of my ancestors that were involved with the War Within The States were from Georgetown, Kentucky. I would be very interested in any information involving David Crumbaugh in Dobbin's First Arkansas Cavalry, John Henry Crumbaugh, Albert H.G. Crumbaugh, and Thornton F.J. Crumbaugh in the Fourth, Fifth, and Ninth Kentucky Cavalry. In particular, Morgan's Ohio raid and the names of people who accompanied Jefferson Davis prior to his capture at Irwinville, GA. After I can gratefully hear your information, I will try to give a couple of supposedly true stories. I also would be very interested in getting a little information on Calvin Crumbaugh, a possible relative, who was from Anderson County, Kentucky, went on Morgan's raid and was captured near Buffington Island. He later died at Camp Douglas and was buried at Confederate Mound. His name is listed on the Court House plaque at Lawrenceburg, KY. I believe that his mother had remarried to a man named Bromley before the war. This is the best that I can do for a first post. Thanks for hearing me out on all this.
     

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  3. PJ Steed

    PJ Steed Private

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    Welcome to the thread. I am sure that the site experts will welcome you soon enough. I am currently conducting my own research on the ACW and will be more than happy to point you in the right directions when I come across anything that might be helpful to you. Good luck with your reseach.
     
  4. sargebill

    sargebill Sergeant

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    Welcome Realevergreen as they always say on here:"someone will know" and if they don't know they WILL find out....lol look forward to seeing your future postings :smile:
     
  5. Union_Buff

    Union_Buff Captain Forum Host

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    Hi there and welcome to the forum :D
     
  6. M E Wolf

    M E Wolf Brigadier General Moderator

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    RealEvergreen,

    I look forward to your future postings here and in many of the forums here. I must warn you though; there will be times the software will net a naughty word or more. It will appear in your post as a ***** . Moderators have no control over it but; if you do find a word that triggers the ****, private message CivilWarTalk or Ami, so they can tinker with the word filter. Until the word is added to the ok list, for example; if you see a word you know is innocent, like fu-rt-her or, General C-um-mings and or ship's s-cr-ew; as exampled, just go back to your original post, hit the edit button and insert a few well placed hyphens if you will, and private message CivilWarTalk or Ami--the CWT List Owners. [Can be contacted by going to your Inbox (messages file), scroll down to the "Send New Message," and explain the problem, where you posted and post # if you can. That way they can find the troublemaker word real fast.

    Another thing we're finding; is that some names are shared by other states, same with roads. So, if you will - when you are talking about Arlington, please denote which one-- Arlington, Virginia, Arlington, Texas, etc. Columbia Pike, is another common road term; so it would help to know where this road is--Virginia or elsewhere. That way, we're able to follow your topic/words/comments and observations.

    Please know there are no quotas but, certainly want to hear from you.

    Post when you feel comfortable in doing so and at your own speed.

    References are wonderful if you have them. It is great to go to the same book, page and read as another poster has; to read all of what that page has to offer. I like official records myself. So, I post all the information I can as to share.

    Personal opinions and comments are welcomed also. So, don't feel this forum requires only references as to post comments about, but it would be appreciated having somewhere stated that it is an opinion.


    Visit our Research your Ancestors Forum also -- great folks monitor that thread are dedicated hunters.



    Respectfully submitted,
    M. E. Wolf
     
  7. M E Wolf

    M E Wolf Brigadier General Moderator

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    Confederate Military History, Vol. 10
    ARKANSAS
    BY COL. JOHN M. HARRELL


    Confederate Military History, Vol. 10
    CHAPTER X.
    Dobbin's Arkansas brigade, Col. Archibald S. Dobbin --Dobbin's cavalry, Col. Archibald S. Dobbin.
    ------
    Nothing found in Confederate Military history, Southern Historical Society on Crumbaugh
    =====================================================
    O.R.--SERIES II--VOLUME II [S# 115]
    Miscellaneous Union Correspondence, etc., Relating to Political Arrests During the First Year of the War.--#6
    DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, November 7, 1861.
    His Excellency WILLIAM DENNISON, Columbus, Ohio.
    GOVERNOR: I have had the honor to receive your telegraphic dispatch of yesterday(*) expressing an opinion that three brothers named Crumbaugh, from Kentucky, now held as prisoners of war, ought to be released, and requesting their discharge after taking the oath of allegiance. In reply I have to state that although reluctant even to delay a compliance with any similar request from you I am compelled by circumstances of which you may not be fully aware to postpone the release of prisoners of war from Kentucky at this juncture. This determination has been reached pursuant to the suggestion of loyal citizens of high standing in that State to which we feel bound to defer.
    I have the honor to be, your excellency's very obedient servant,
    WILLIAM H. SEWARD.
    -------------
    DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, November 11, 1861.
    His Excellency WILLIAM DENNISON,
    Governor of Ohio, Columbus.
    SIR: I have examined the papers relative to the case of the Messrs. Crumbaugh and am of the impression that although these persons might not if released pursuant to your recommendation engage in the military service of the insurgents there is nothing to show that they would not seek civil employment under them. If therefore you will sound them as to their disposition to enter into an engagement not to accept employment of any kind in that quarter or to do any hostile act against the United States, and should find such disposition to exist, the expediency of their discharge will again be taken into consideration.
    I have the honor to be, your excellency's obedient servant,
    WILLIAM H. SEWARD.
    -----
    O.R.--SERIES II--VOLUME II [S# 115]
    Memoranda of Various Political Arrests--From Record Book, U. S. Department of State, "Arrests for Disloyalty."--#1
    David B. and John H. Crumbaugh were arrested by the home guard in Clark County, Ky., and taken to Camp Chase, Ohio, in October, 1861. They were charged with attempting to enter the insurrectionary States contrary to the President's proclamation, David B. proposing to practice law in Arkansas and John H. intending to go to Mississippi where he had been engaged as an overseer of a plantation. A telegram dated November 7, 1861, from Governor Dennison, of Ohio, asks the release of the brothers Crumbaugh. The Secretary of State replies under date of November 8 that he is compelled to postpone the release of any prisoners of war from Kentucky at this juncture. Subsequently the Secretary of State requested Governor Dennison to sound them as to their disposition to engage not to accept employment of any kind in the South or do any act hostile to the United States.
    -----
    Nothing more is found last name Crumbaugh.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------
     
  8. M E Wolf

    M E Wolf Brigadier General Moderator

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    KENTUCKY
    BY COL. J. STODDARD JOHNSTON.
    ----
    KENTUCKY--CHAPTER XV.
    RAPID RECUPERATION OF THE ARMY AFTER ITS RETURN FROM KENTUCKY--OCCUPATION OF MIDDLE TENNESSEE--REORGANIZATION OF KENTUCKY TROOPS--THE KENTUCKY BRIGADE AGAIN RE-UNITED--GENERAL HANSON IN COMMAND--CAVALRY ORGANIZATIONS--BRILLIANT MOVEMENT OF GENERAL MORGAN--CAPTURE OF HARTSVILLE WITH 2,000 PRISONERS--BATTLE OF MURFREES-BORO--BRAGG'S ORDER OF BATTLE--SOME DETAILS OF THE BLOODY ENGAGEMENT--SECOND BATTLE--HEAVY LOSS IN BRECKINRIDGE'S DIVISION--DEATH OF GENERAL HANSON--BRECKINRIDGE'S REPORT --RETREAT FROM MURFREESBORO.
    [excerpt]
    The Kentucky cavalry had been increased, and on the first of November, 1862, Morgan's cavalry brigade, then in east Tennessee, showed the following organization: Second Kentucky, Col. B. W. Duke; Seventh Kentucky, Col. R. M. Gano; Eighth Kentucky, Col. R. S. Cluke; Eleventh Kentucky, Col. D. W. Chenault; Ninth Kentucky battalion, Maj. W. C. P. Breckinridge; Howitzer battery, Captain Arnett. The Ninth battalion, united with Stoner's battalion, was later raised to a regiment, and its commander became a colonel.

    The Seventh, Eighth and Ninth regiments had been recruited during the late campaign in Kentucky, and another, the First Kentucky regiment, recruited and reorganized by Col. J. Russell Butler, was temporarily assigned to Colonel Scott's brigade. A number of other inchoate regiments came out, which, if the occupation of Kentucky had lasted awhile longer, would have all been filled; but as it was, those under Col. D. Howard Smith, the Fifth; Col. J. Warren Grigsby, Sixth, and Col. Adam R. Johnson, Tenth, were soon available and made valuable accessions to the command a little later in middle Tennessee. With General Marshall also went out of Kentucky into Virginia a number of organizations, some of them regiments and others battalions, which did valuable service during the remainder of the war. Among these were the Fifth infantry, Gen. John S. Williams' original regiment, whose time had expired, but which was recruited and reorganized by Col. Hiram Hawkins; the Fourth Kentucky cavalry, Col. Henry L. Giltner; Eleventh Kentucky mounted infantry, known also as the Thirteenth regiment Kentucky cavalry, Col. Benjamin E. Caudill; Second battalion Kentucky cavalry, Maj. Clarence J. Prentice; Second Kentucky mounted rifles, Lieut.-Col. Thomas Johnson; and the Third battalion Kentucky mounted rifles, Lieut.-Col. Ezekiel F. Clay; together with several independent companies of scouts and partisan rangers.

    [excerpt]
    General Breckinridge's division was composed of five brigades: Hanson's, Preston's, Adams', Palmer's and Jackson's, the first three commanders being natives of Kentucky. Hanson's brigade was as follows: First brigade, Col. Roger W. Hanson:--Forty-first Alabama, Col. M. L. Stansil; Second Kentucky, Maj. J. w. Hewitt; Fourth Kentucky, Col. R. P. Trabue; Sixth Kentucky, Col. J. H. Lewis; Ninth Kentucky, Col. T. H. Hunt; Cobb's Kentucky battery, Capt. Robert Cobb, Graves' Kentucky battery, Capt. J. J. Ingram; Kentucky cavalry company, Capt. R. E. Roberts.
    =======================================
    Southern Historical Society Papers
    1958. New Series, Vol. 13, Old Series, Vol. LI.
    2d Confederate Congress--(2d Session)--Tuesday, November 22, 1864.
    HE SALTVILLE FIGHT
    Mr. Miles, from the Committee on Military Affairs, to whom was referred the joint resolution of thanks to General John S. Williams and the officers and men of his command for their victory over the enemy at Saltville, Virginia, on the 2d of October, reported back the same with the recommendation that it do not pass; but offering one in lieu of it, differing from the original resolution in this one respect--that it embraces, by name, besides the officers and men of General Williams' command, the Virginia Reserves. The original resolution was laid on the table, and the one reported by the Committee, in lieu of it, was passed.

    Mr. Marshall, of Kentucky, (coming into the hall after the passage of the resolution), moved its reconsideration. He said the resolution, as passed, was unjust. It referred to the "officers and men of General Williams' command," and in this form did not include troops who had participated in the battle. There were troops who contributed to achieving the victory who did not belong to General Williams' command. The Fourth and Tenth Kentucky cavalry were engaged in the fight; they rendered most gallant service. The Fourth Kentucky cavalry alone opposed Burbridge's advance for a day and a half--and yet these troops, strictly speaking, did not form a part of General Williams' command. He moved that the resolution be re-committed, that it might be so altered in its phraseology as to include all troops who took part in the fight.

    Mr. Miles said he regretted that the resolution of thanks should become a subject of discussion.--Certainly it was the desire of the Committee to give full credit to all who were engaged in that battle. The Committee had held a conference with the mover of the original resolution, and had given the subject their most respectful consideration. It was not for them to know all the troops engaged in the affair. He regretted that the gentleman from Kentucky had not been present at the meeting of the Committee. He was desirous that credit should be given alike to all, and he had no objection to the resolution being recommitted.

    So the resolution was recommitted.
     
  9. M E Wolf

    M E Wolf Brigadier General Moderator

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    Campaigns Of The Civil War--VII.
    The Army Of The Cumberland
    By Henry M. Cist,
    Brevet Brigadier-General U. S. V.; A. A. G. On The Staff Of Major General Rosecrans, And The Staff Of Major-General Thomas; Secretary Of The Society Of The, Army Of The Cumberland,
    New York
    Charles Scribner's Sons


    The Army Of The Cumberland
    Chapter IV.--Morgan's And Forrest's Raids.
    [excerpt]
    This loss occurred the day after the opening of the road from Nashville south, and very seriously interfered with the movements at the front. Nelson endeavored to intercept Forrest, but could not successfully "chase cavalry with infantry.'' Forrest on Nelson's approach withdrew to McMinnville, and from there made a dash on Lebanon, some fifty miles distant, where he expected to find a force of five hundred Federal cavalry. This force escaped him, and he then swept around to the south of Nashville, captured 150 bridge guards and burned four bridges. Learning that Nelson was again in pursuit of him, Forrest returned to McMinnville.

    From this point he made repeated raids on the line of road south of Nashville, leaving Morgan to operate against the Louisville and Nashville Railroad. These raiders were able to move almost without opposition, as Buell was without sufficient cavalry to cope with them. The latter had been compelled to divide his cavalry into small bands to run down the guerillas that had been operating on his line of railroad. Now that Forrest's and Morgan's commands had become so formidable, he was compelled to organize his cavalry into united bodies for better defensive movements against these raiders. The Second Indiana, Fourth and Fifth Kentucky, and Seventh Pennsylvania cavalry regiments he formed into one brigade, and on August 11th, he sent it under General R. W. Johnson against Morgan, who had been ordered by Bragg to break the railroad between Louisville and Nashville, in order to retard Buell's movement north to Louisville as much as possible, and who was operating about Gallatin, Tennessee, which he had captured with 200 prisoners. Colonel Boone was in command of the Federal forces at this point. Morgan hearing that Boone slept in the town away from the camp, sent a small force to capture him, which was done, just as he had dressed and was starting to camp. Morgan then destroyed a railroad bridge south of Gallatin, and the tunnel six miles north, the roof of which was supported with large beams on upright timbers, Running some freight cars into the tunnel, they were set on fire and some eight hundred feet of it destroyed, the roof caving in.

    Johnson sought to attack Morgan before he could unite with Forrest, who was on his Lebanon raid at that time, but Morgan hearing that Johnson had infantry and artillery supports, endeavored to avoid an engagement. Johnson forced the fight, engaged Morgan with spirit, and although repulsed three times, after the first and second repulse formed promptly and renewed the attack. After the third repulse the Federal forces commenced retreating, when Morgan followed, attacked Johnson's retreating forces and drove the Federals some three miles. Johnson reformed his lines twice, but the enemy broke, and drove them each time. He then reformed the remnant of his command and fought the enemy dismounted, when the latter charged again, and Johnson, seeing that the greater part of his command had scattered, surrendered. The force that was with him at this time was only a small band of some twenty-five soldiers and a few officers. His loss was 20 killed and 42 wounded. Duke, in his "History of Morgan's Cavalry," says: "A great deal of censure was at the time cast upon these men"—Johnson's command—"and they were accused of arrant cowardice by the Northern press. Nothing could have been more unjust. They attacked with spirit and without hesitation, and were unable to close with us on account of their heavy loss in men and horses. I have seen troops much more highly boasted than these were before their defeat, behave not nearly so well." And of Johnson, Duke says: "His attack was made promptly and in splendid style; his dispositions throughout the first fight were good, and he exhibited fine personal courage and energy."

    [Note: Fourth and Fifth Kentucky Cavalry (Union)]
     
  10. M E Wolf

    M E Wolf Brigadier General Moderator

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    Confederate Military History, Vol. 7
    ALABAMA--BY LIEUT.-GEN. JOSEPH WHEELER.

    Confederate Military History, Vol. 7
    ALABAMA--CHAPTER V.

    THE EIGHTH CONFEDERATE CAVALRY.
    The Eighth Confederate cavalry was organized after the battle of Shiloh, by the consolidation of Brewer's, Bell's and Baskerville's battalions, comprising six Alabama and four Mississippi companies. Brewer's, one of the first mounted bodies raised in the State, fought with distinction at Shiloh, and acted as rear guard for Polk's army. The Eighth moved with the army of Tennessee into Kentucky and fought with it before and after the battle of Murfreesboro; was in Wheeler's dash on Rosecrans' rear during the battle. It lost heavily at Shelbyville, where a portion of the regiment was captured, and suffered severely at Chickamauga and Dalton. It took part in the capture of Stoneman, and fought as infantry in the Dalton-Atlanta campaign. It was with Wheeler in his last raid into Tennessee, then moved into Virginia, except part of his regiment which was attached to Chalmers' brigade and skirmished in Alabama until the close of the war. The remainder fought Burbridge at Saltville, and pursued Sherman; fighting incessantly until it surrendered at Greensboro, 100 strong. Col. W. B. Wade was wounded in Tennessee. Lieut.-Col. J. S. Prather was wounded, and Major McCaa killed, at Murfreesboro; Maj. John
    Wright was wounded at Shelbyville; Captains Ferguson, Thompson and Lindsay and Adjutant Goodrich were captured. Capt. John McEl-derry was killed near Dalton, Capt. Joseph A. Mathews near Columbia; Capt. Henry Holmes was wounded at Boonsville and Jonesboro, and Capt. Francis Pinckard died in the service. Col. R. H. Brewer, of Brewer's battalion, was a graduate of West Point. He resigned, and was afterward killed in the valley of Virginia, in 1864.

    EXTRACTS FROM OFFICIAL WAR RECORDS.
    Brewer's Battalion, Alabama cavalry: Vol. VII--(854) At Paris, Tenn., January, 1862, in Stewart's brigade, Polk's army. (909) Mentioned by Gen. Daniel Ruggles, February 26th, Florence, Ala.

    [excerpt]
    No. 53--(371-374) Generals Hooker and Howard (Union) report regiment, 300 strong, at Trenton, October 14, 1863. (500) Under Capt. J. H. Field, in Hagan's brigade, Martin's division, August 15th. (589) Ordered to report to General Martin without delay. (708) Ordered to report to General Martin as soon as relieved by Ninth Kentucky cavalry, September 27th.
    ----------------
    KENTUCKY--CHAPTER XIX.

    [excerpt]
    With the fall of Atlanta, besides the change in the service of the Kentucky brigade from infantry to cavalry, came also a new assignment in the line of service. It had up to this time always been attached to the army of the West, known first as the army of the Mississippi and then as the army of Tennessee. But now when General Hood with his army advanced north to attempt the capture of Nashville and to meet his Waterloo at Franklin, leaving Sherman to prosecute his "march to the sea," the brigade was detached from the army with which it had so long served, and .left as part of the forlorn hope to impede Sherman's progress. The effect of the new order mounting the brigade was inspiriting to the men, as they had long desired the change, and it meant to them a relief from the drudgery of marching and the gratification of an in-bern partiality of the Kentuckian for the horse. To the absentees of the brigade, the sick and wounded, and the men on detailed service, it acted as a healing balm for the first two, and brought applications from the last for return to active duty. So that when the brigade was mounted in October, with recruits from this source, and exchanged prisoners, it numbered about
    nine hundred men. They were mounted on such horses as could be procured, generally too poor for dashing cavalry, but available for transferring their riders from point to point and enabling them to do efficient duty as mounted infantry. There was practically no army with which to oppose the march of General Sherman except a weak corps of cavalry commanded by Gen. Joseph Wheeler, which served chiefly to hold in check the cavalry of the enemy and to protect the country from marauding expeditions.

    he brigade was placed in the division of Gen. Alfred Iverson, of Georgia, and served there to the close of the war, the division a part of the time being commanded by Gen. Pierce M. B. Young. The details of its operations were not of sufficient moment to follow minutely. It began its service on the picket line near Atlanta, and from the middle of November, when Sherman took up his march, its movements were retrograde for a month until Sherman captured Savannah. Then, when he turned <cmh9a_197>northward, they followed over the ground made famous in the revolution by the cavalry of Sumter and Marion, but the conditions were not favorable for brilliant operations. In addition to the Kentucky brigade under General Lewis, Williams' brigade of cavalry, commanded by Col. W. C. P. Breckinridge, served as part of General Wheeler's corps, being attached to the division of Gen. G. G. Dibrell. It comprised the First (Third) Kentucky cavalry, Lieut.-Col. Jacob W. Griffith; Second Kentucky (Woodward's), Maj. Thomas W. Lewis; and Ninth Kentucky cavalry, Colonel Breckinridge. In the Rebellion Records, Vol. XLVII, page 860, appears an order from General Hardee's headquarters, January x, 1865, consolidating this brigade with General Lewis', but it was never carried into effect.

    An inspection report of Maj. J. G. Devereux to Gen. Samuel Cooper, Richmond, dated February 10, 1865, gives the following account of the brigade: "The brigade commanded by Brig.-Gen. Joseph H. Lewis is composed of the Second, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth and Ninth Kentucky regiments of infantry, which were mounted both men and officers by command of General Hood, on public animals, mostly horses, but many of them mules, which have been receipted for by the acting quartermaster. The brigade lacks about 200 horses to complete its mounting. The men who need these horses are acting as infantry. The horse equipments are generally in good order and were mostly issued from government workshops. A detail of the men is making up the deficiency by constructing excellent saddles. It is gratifying to report that there are but few absentees without leave from this brigade."

    Such was the condition of the brigade in the closing scenes of the war, and the picture applies as well to that of the other Kentucky troops. The end was near, and came at Washington, Ga., where, on the 6th of May, General Johnston having surrendered on the 26th of April, they received their paroles together with Breckinridge's brigade, and the remnant of General Morgan's command brought from Southwestern Virginia by General Duke, as heretofore detailed.
     
  11. M E Wolf

    M E Wolf Brigadier General Moderator

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    Southern Historical Society Papers
    Vol IX. Richmond, Va., Oct., Nov And Dec., 1881. Nos. 10, 11 & 12.
    The Last Days Of The Confederate Treasury And
    What Became Of Its Specie.
    By Captain M.H. Clark.
    (It is the purpose of the Secretary to compile for early publication a full statement of the disposition made of the Confederate specie at the close of the war, which shall forever set at rest the miserable slanders against President Davis, which have been so often refuted only to be revived by the malignity of his enemies. And we ask everyone, who has any facts bearing on the question, to send them to us at once. But, in the meantime, we publish the following clear and conclusive statement by the last Acting Treasurer of the Confederacy, Captain M.H. Clark, only omitting the opening paragraphs, which are not essential:smile:
    Clarksville, Tenn, January 10th, 1882.

    To the Editor of the Courier Journal:
    * * * * * * * * * * * *
    I will state briefly as possible my connection with the Confederate Treasury, and run hastily over the route from Richmond, Va., to Washington, Ga.

    I left Richmond, Va., the night of the evacuation with all the papers of the Executive office, on the special train containing the President, his staff, his Cabinet (excepting the Secretary of War, General John C. Breckinridge,) and many other government officials, being at the time the chief and confidential clerk of the Executive office. The party reached Danville, Va., next day (General Breckinridge arriving a few days afterwards) where the government officers were partially reorganized and opened, remaining there until the 10th of April, when the news of General R.E. Lee's surrender was received. The next move was to Greensboro, N.C., the headquarters of General G.T. Beauregard's little army. A stay of some days was made there, during which General J.E. Johnston reported for a conference as to the general situation. When the President's party prepared to leave, as the railroads were cut at several points south of us by the Federal cavalry under General Stoneman, who were still raiding to the southwest of our line of travel, by orders of Colonels William Preston Johnston and John Taylor Wood (of the President's staff,) I applied to General Beauregard for the necessary facilities for the journey, who directed Colonel A.R. Chisolm, of his staff, to give me carte blanche orders upon his chief Quartermaster, Major Chisman, and his Commissary Department for what I needed, from which departments I made up a full train of wagons and ambulances for my papers, the baggage of the party and the provisions necessary for our large following, for many had attached themselves to the party, and I had brought out from Richmond, Va., the "President's Guard" -- disabled soldiers, commanded by three one armed officers, Captain Coe and Lieutenants Brown and Dickinson. General Beauregard sent as escort a small cavalry division, under command of that gallant Tennesseean, General George G. Dibrell, comprising Williams' brigade, under command of General W.C.P. Breckinridge; Dibrell's brigade, under Colonel W.S. McLemore, and Hewitt's battery, under Lieutenant Roberts, and perhaps a few detached small regiments. Captain Given Campbell (an active, efficient officer) and his company from the Ninth Kentucky cavalry were detailed for special service with the President, his men being used as scouts, guides and couriers, the cavalry force not traveling as a rule upon the same road as the party.


    The party proceeded to Charlotte, N.C., where, after a stay of a week (where we heard of the assassination of President Lincoln), the route was taken to Abbeville, S.C. At Charlotte a large accession was made to the cavalry force General Basil W. Duke with his brigade, General Vaughn and some other detachments from Southwest Virginia, and General Ferguson, and scattering battalions, making quite a full force, which was taken charge of by General John C. Breckinridge in his position as Major General.

    General Duke had just before won the most complete victory of his career, attacking and driving away from Marion, Va., a large force of General Stoneman's mounted infantry, who left dead and wounded on the ground, man for man, as many as Duke had under his command in the battle -- a brilliant sunset in the closing career of this Kentucky soldier.

    Of General Breckinridge I saw a good deal, as we occupied the same room at Mr. Keilbrun's, his son, Captain Cabell Breckinridge, being with him. At Charlotte, N.C., I replenished my stores under an order from Hon. S.R. Mallory, Secretary of the Navy, upon the Naval Storekeeper, and an incident occurred which, perhaps, caused the escape of Colonel Wood when the President's party was captured in Southern Georgia -- finding a lot of good blue navy shirts among the stores, he suggested taking a few to secure change of raiment to such as might need it. He had on one of these shirts the morning of the capture, and in the dim light was enabled to pass through the blue coated Federal cavalry, mistaken for one of their own men. Leaving Charlotte N.C., the cavalry force also took the route South under command of General John C. Breckinridge.

    We arrived at Abbeville, S.C., the morning of the 2nd of May. Mr. Haldeman was there, according to recollection, and saw the party come in. While there, the President made his headquarters at Colonel Armistead Burt's, Colonel William Preston Johnston at Colonel Henry J. Leovy's, with that patriotic family, the Monroes, of Kentucky. At Abbeville, S.C., the Treasury officers reported the train at the depot, having been a part of the time under escort of Admiral Raphael Semmes' little naval force to protect it from the Federal cavalry, who were raiding on a parallel line with our route, between us and the mountains. Mr. J.A. Trenholm, the Secretary of the Treasury, having been left quite ill near the Catawba river, the President appointed the Postmaster General, Hon. John H. Reagan, acting Secretary of the Treasury, who took charge of that department, and placed the train under charge of the cavalry to convoy it to Washington, Ga. The party, except General John C. Breckinridge, left for Washington that night, crossing the Savannah river on a pontoon bridge, stopping for breakfast and to feed horses a few miles from Washington. Colonel Burton N. Harrison had previously left the party to join Mrs. Davis and her family. At our breakfast halt, when the road was taken, Mr. Benjamin came to me and said "good bye," as he did not intend to go farther with the party, and turned off south from that point. I never saw him again, though traveling on his track over 400 miles. Mr. Mallory left the party at Washington, Ga., going to a friend's in the neighborhood.

    President Davis' headquarters were at Dr. Robertson's, whose charming family were profuse in their hospitalities, as were many others, General A.R. Lawton's (the Quartermaster General,) and General E.P. Alexander's among the rest.

    Next morning Colonel William Preston Johnston informed me that Mr. Reagan had applied for me to act as Treasurer, to take charge of the Treasury matters, and I was ordered to report to him, and doing so was handed my commission, which is now before me and reads as follows, viz:

    Washington, Ga., May 4, 1865. M.H. Clark, Esq., is hereby appointed Acting Treasurer of the Confederate States, and is authorized to act as such during the absence of the Treasurer.
    Jefferson Davis.
    (This was the last official signature President Davis affixed to any paper.)

    Returning to my train to get some necessary articles, President Davis rode up with his party, when what I supposed were farewell words passed between us, and my train, under charge of its Quartermaster, moved out. The Treasury train arrived shortly after President Davis' party left. and being reported at General Basil W. Duke's camp, about a mile from town, I went there with the proper authority and he turned the whole of it over to me. Selecting the shade of a large elm tree as the "Treasury Department," I commenced my duties as Acting Treasurer C.S.

    Now for the specie assets of the Treasury.

    It must be remembered that a month or more before the evacuation of Richmond, Va., for the relief of the people, to furnish them a currency to buy supplies outside of our lines, and also to call in currency to pay off the troops, and for other purposes, the Treasury Department had opened its depositories and had been selling silver coin, the rate being fixed at $60 for $1 in coin. While at Danville, Va., the Treasury Department resumed these sales, the rate there being $70 for $1.

    About $40,000 in silver, generally reported (and no doubt correctly) at $39,000, was left at Greensboro, N.C., as a military chest for the forces there, under charge of the Treasurer, Mr. John C. Hendren; all of the balance was turned into my hands, which amounted, in gold and silver coin, gold and silver bullion, to $288,022.90. Adding the $39,000 left at Greensboro, N.C., the Treasury contained in coin and bullion when it left Danville, Va., $327,022.90.

    f the Treasury at Richmond had contained $2,500,000 in coin certainly the brave men of our armies would never have suffered so severely from want of sufficient food and clothing as they did during the winter of 1864-'65, for it had been demonstrated that gold could draw food and raiment from without the lines. With the train at Washington, Ga., however, was the specie belonging to the Virginia banks, which sometime before had been ordered to be turned over to their officers, who had accompanied it out from Richmond, and, devoted to their duties, had never left it; but the proper officer had not been present to make the transfer. It had never been mixed with the Treasury funds, but kept apart and distinct, and when Acting Secretary Reagan ordered the transfer to be made, no handling of specie or counting was necessary, but merely permission for the cashiers and tellers to take control of their own matters. I knew them all personally, having been a Richmond boy myself, the papers of this transaction are not before me, and my recollection is not positively
    clear as to the amount, but my impression is that it was about $230,000. General E.P. Alexander has already given in your columns the after fate of this fund. As a history of the Virginia banks' specie would make a chapter of itself, and as it was not a part of the Confederate Treasury assets, I drop further mention of it.

    While at Washington, Ga., communications were received from General John C. Breckinridge that payments had been promised to the cavalry from the train by him at a halt on the road the night of the 3d. The action of General Breckinridge in the premises was ratified, and President Davis gave some other directions before he left. General Breckinridge arrived in Washington, Ga., an hour or so after President Davis left, and my recollection of his statement was in brief as follows: That during the night of the 3d, en route from Abbeville, S.C.., to Washington, Ga., he found the cavalry and train at a halt, resting. Stopping, he learned from the officers that the men were dissatisfied at the position of affairs; that they were guarding a train which could not be carried safely much farther; the Federal cavalry were known to be in full force not a great distance off; the destination and disposition of their own force was an uncertain one; their paper money was worthless for their needs; that they might never reach Washington, Ga., with it, etc. A crowd gathered around, when General Breckinridge made a little speech, appealing to their honor as Confederate soldiers not to violate the trust reposed in them, but to remain Southern soldiers and gentlemen; and that when they reached Washington with the train, fair payments should be made to them from it.

    The men responded frankly and openly, saying they proposed to violate no trust; they were there to guard the train from all, and would guard it, but expressed as above what they considered due them in the matter, and, as they would be paid some money in Washington, Ga., and no one could tell what would happen before they reached there, they could give no good reason for delay.

    General Breckinridge replied that, if they wished an instant compliance with his promise, he would redeem it at once, and ordered up the train to the house at which he had stopped, and had the wagons unloaded; the quartermasters being ordered to make out their payrolls, when a certain amount was counted out and turned over to the proper officers. The wagons were then reloaded, and, after the rest, the route was taken up, reaching Washington, Ga., next morning, where the quartermasters paid off from their rolls. The boys told me they got about $26 apiece; enough, they hoped, to take them through.

    {Goes on about the money - major excerpt}
    Nothing more is mentioned of the 9th Kentucky Cavalry.
    ======================
    M. E. Wolf
     
  12. Jon G.

    Jon G. Sergeant

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    Hello and welcome to Civil War talk....and a great first post. Really looking forward to reading the stories you mentioned. There's lots of stuff about Morgan and his men on line and I've recently read old books about them on line.
     
  13. M E Wolf

    M E Wolf Brigadier General Moderator

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    Bromley:

    The Life and Campaigns of Major-General J.E.B. Stuart
    Appendix.--Roll Of The Third Regiment Virginia Cavalry.
    ROLL OF COMPANY F. NEW KENT COUNTY.
    Captain, MELVILLE VAIDEN, died December, 1861.
    1st Lieutenant, GEORGE T. BROMLEY, resigned August, 1861.
    -----------
    O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLVII/2 [S# 99]
    CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN NORTH CAROLINA (FROM FEBRUARY 1), SOUTH CAROLINA, SOUTHERN GEORGIA, AND EAST FLORIDA, FROM JANUARY 1, 1865, TO MARCH 23, 1865.--#4
    HUMES' DIVISION.
    Brig. Gen. WILLIAM Y. C. HUMES.
    Ashby's Brigade.
    1st Tennessee, Lieut. Col. James H. Lewis.
    2d Tennessee, Lieut. Col. John H. Kuhn.
    5th Tennessee, Col. George W. McKenzie.
    9th Tennessee Battalion, Capt. W. L. Bromley.
    ------------
    O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLIX/2 [S# 104]
    Union Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Kentucky, Southwestern Virginia, Tennessee, Northern And Central Georgia, Mississippi, Alabama, And West Florida, From March 16 To June 30, 1865.(*)--#18
    HEADQUARTERS SIXTH DIVISION, CAVALRY CORPS,
    MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,
    Pulaski, Tenn., April 21, 1865.
    Brig. Gen. W. D. WHIPPLE,
    Assistant Adjutant-General, Department of the Cumberland:
    I have the honor to invite the attention of the major-general commanding to the following statement of facts, submitted to me by a citizen, in whom I believe reliance may be placed: On Sunday, the 9th instant, three soldiers, Brewer, Stutts, and Kiddy by name, with two Confederates, who would not show themselves, and cannot therefore be identified, belonging to a company of the Second Tennessee Mounted Infantry which is stationed at Clifton, came to the house of Mr. William Johnson, living on Sugar Creek, some eighteen or twenty miles southwest of this place, and demanded of his wife, he not being at home, $12,000. She told them she had no money, when they hung her and her daughter several times, completing their diabolical work by each of them outraging the person of Mrs. Johnson. From Johnson's house these men went to the house of John D. Wade, Johnson's brother-in-law, living in the same neighborhood, and by the same process of hanging and threats extracted $50 from him. From Wade's the scoundrels went to P. P. Powell's, where they repeated the operation of hanging upon him. From Powell's they went to John Guest's, whom they beat nearly to death, and upon his entreating one of them by name to spare his life they, finding they were known, killed him; three shots were put into his body. From Powell's they went to Dr. James McDougal's, at Wayland's Spring; the doctor being absent, they demanded money of Mrs. McDougal, who gave them all she had, and they then left, and are supposed to have gone back to Clifton. The full names of these outlaws as given me are Thomas Brewer, Wall Stutts, and Thomas Kiddy. It is stated to me that Lieut. James J. Bromley, of the company or command at Clifton, knows all of these soldiers and all of the witnesses by whom the facts can be proven, and that he discountenances, and so far as he may, represses all such proceedings. He is suggested as a proper person to be placed in charge of the investigation of the matter and the arrest of the offenders. The facts above recited can, I am informed, be established by the following witnesses: William Johnson, wife, and daughter, heretofore residing on Sugar Creek, in Wayne County, but now moving to Bedford County, between Cornersville and Shelbyville; John D. Wade, William Danley, John McClearin, James Guest (or Gest), son of the murdered man, Richard Olive, John Wash. Brewer, William Brewer, commonly called Budd Brewer; all living in the neighborhood in which these outrages were committed.
    Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
    R. W. JOHNSON,
    Brigadier-General.
    -----
    O.R.--SERIES IV--VOLUME II [S# 128]
    Correspondence, Orders, Reports, And Returns Of The Confederate Authorities, July 1, 1862-December 31, 1863.(*)--#37
    HEADQUARTERS STATE OF MISSISSIPPI,
    ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR GENERAL'S OFFICE,
    Columbus, November 1, 1863.
    His Excellency JOHN J. PETTUS,
    Governor and Commander-in-Chief :
    SIR: I have the honor to submit herewith a report of Mississippi regiments and battalions now in the service of the Confederate States.
    [excerpt]
    I have the honor to be, Your Excellency's most obedient servant,
    JONES S. HAMILTON,
    Adjutant and Inspector General of State of Mississippi.
    [Sub-inclosure.]
    Second Regiment, No. 1: Colonel, W. C. Falkner; lieutenant-colonel, Bartley B. Boone; major, David W. Humphreys. O'Connor Rifles, Capt. J. H. Buchanan; Magnolia Rifles, Capt. ----- -----; Joe Mathews Rifles, Capt. W. D. Beck; Tishomingo Rifles, Capt. ----- -----; Calhoun Rifles, Capt. John F. Booth; Town Creek Rifles, Capt. W. C. Bromley; Pontotoc Minute Men, Capt. H. R. Miller; Coonewar Rifles, Capt. S. H. Taylor; Cherry Creek Rifles, Capt. John B. Herring; Iuka Rifles, Capt. J. M. Stone; 800 men, rank and file.
    [excerpt]
    Fourth Regiment Minute Men: Colonel, W. C. Bromley; lieutenant-colonel, J. J. Stone; major, B. M. Kilgore. Time expired.
    =============================
    Medical/Surgical History--Part III, Volume II
    Chapter X.--Wounds And Injuries Of The Lower Extremities.
    Section V.--Wounds And Operations In The Leg.
    Fatal Intermediary Amputations in the Lower Third of the Leg
    19 Bromley, W., Pt., A, 149th N. York, age 33. May 6, 13, '64. Left; circular. Discharged May 25, 1865.
    ---------------
    Medical/Surgical History--Part III, Volume II
    Chapter X.--Wounds And Injuries Of The Lower Extremities.
    Section V.--Wounds And Operations In The Leg.
    Fatal Secondary Amputations in the Lower Third of the Leg for Shot Injury.
    7 Bromley, H., Pt., I, 14th Pennsylvania Cavalry, age 28. May 28, July 12, 1864. Right; flap. Discharged January 27, 1865.

    ---------------------------------
    No more hits found in the files I have.

    M. E. Wolf
     
  14. M E Wolf

    M E Wolf Brigadier General Moderator

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    O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXII/1 [S# 32]
    JULY 4, 1863.--Attack on Helena, Ark.
    No. 25.--Report of Col. Archibald S. Dobbin, Arkansas Cavalry.
    IN THE FIELD, July 5, 1863.
    GENERAL: I respectfully submit the following report of the movement of my regiment on the 4th ultimo [instant]:

    According to your order I moved my regiment and battery of four pieces on the evening of the 3d from the Bouie farm, on the Little Rock road, 4 miles west of Helena, to the old Porter farm east of Crowley's Ridge, on the road leading from Helena to Sterling, a distance of about 15 miles, and remained at that place until 2 o'clock on the morning of the 4th; then moved down the road to a point where the mill road intersects the Sterling road, 1½ miles north of Helena, where I dismounted 150 men, and sent them forward as skirmishers beyond the blockade to within three-quarters of a mile of Helena and a short distance above the levee leading out from the hills. I then dismounted 150 more men, and sent them forward to the same point, and extended the line of skirmishers from the hills to the Mississippi River. I then drew up the remainder of the regiment in line of battle north of the blockade, about 400 yards in the rear of the line of skirmishers, and then awaited to learn the result of the attack made by General Marmaduke upon the battery and fortifications on Rightor Hill, and not learning anything definite, and discovering the enemy moving up between the levee and Mississippi River. I moved my battery forward, according to your order, and commenced firing on the enemy advancing, and also the enemy's batteries playing upon General Marmaduke's command and my front. I then advanced, causing the enemy to fall back, moving their battery some 600 yards farther down the levee. About two hours after, the enemy again advanced, with artillery, and much larger than than at first. I again opened fire on them with my battery and small-arms, and, with the assistance of a portion of Colonel [Robert C.] Newton's regiment, again caused them to fall back and move their battery still farther down the levee, after which skirmishing was kept up until some three hours after the firing had ceased along our entire line, at which time I received your order to fall back slowly on the Grant Mill road, which I succeeded in doing without losing any men after I left the battle-field.

    The loss in my regiment, in the engagements, was 4 killed and 8 wounded--1 mortally, 2 seriously, and 5 slightly. For particulars, 1 refer you to report of Dr. Dunn, surgeon of my regiment, herewith inclosed

    The officers and men of my regiment and battery deserve great credit for gallantry and courage displayed on that day.
    Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
    ARCH. S. DOBBIN,
    Colonel, Commanding Regiment Cavalry.

    Brigadier-General [L. M.] WALKER.
    --------------------------------------
    O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLI/1 [S# 83]
    AUGUST 29-DECEMBER 2, 1864.--Price's Missouri Expedition.
    No. 89.--Organization of Price's Army.
    FAGAN'S DIVISION.
    Maj. Gen. JAMES F. FAGAN
    Dobbin's Brigade.
    Col. ARCHIBALD S. DOBBIN.
    Dobbin's (Arkansas) Cavalry, Col. Archibald S. Dobbin.
    McGhee's (Arkansas) Cavalry, Col. James McGhee.
    Witt's (Arkansas) Cavalry, Col. A. R. Witt.
    Blocher's (Arkansas) Battery (one section), Lieut. J. V. Zimmerman.
    -----------
    Dobbin would have had a reputation like Stuart, Wheeler, Morgan, had he been anywhere else but Arkansas, from what I've skimmed over reports made by Generals who commanded over Dobbin. Dobbin did parlay a lot with the Federals and did some trading until Marmaduke had him arrested. The practice was halted. Still nothing found on your relative's names.

    M. E. Wolf
     
  15. realevergreen

    realevergreen Private

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    I believe, right now at least, that Arch Dobbin may sometimes have been his own worst enemy. Also, he backed the loser in the duel between Marmaduke and Walker. In the beginning, he farmed on an island in the MS river between AR and MS. His wife's folks from TN didn't really think too much of him. I believe that some of the Federals thought him not too much better than an outlaw. Probably explains part of the reason why the company miller, David B. Crumbaugh, lost his horse and saddle when he surrendered at Wittsburg, AR in 1865. Dobbin's wife and family were back at her family's place in TN . Dobbin's claimed that he couldn't live with the Yankees and ended up in Brazil in or near the Confederados settlements. Dobbin's doctor brother went to see him, found Brazil impossible, and returned to the U.S. Arch Dobbins was later murdered by natives.
     
  16. realevergreen

    realevergreen Private

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    Thanks for putting this on. I apologize in advance for tooting the family horn too much. Please just get a little cotton for your ears or just scroll on down. I can't really take any credit for the info in some of the posts I might make as it was all found by others and I just swept it up and dumped it here. I will be happy as a clam after making some posts if I can just go back to reading about others on here who have way more info about other people and events in other places. I have only one regret about this site - I wish that I had found it sooner. I really like some of the information about the western war zones that has been on here in the last year. And I will never be able to add any small amount of info as good as has been put on here recently.
     
  17. realevergreen

    realevergreen Private

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    bad little Crumbaugh boys

    I believe that, right now, there were only really two out of six of the bad little Crumbaugh boys that were caught in the wrong place in Kentucky in 1861. They reallly weren't bad and they really weren't little; just young. I have used this description of them partly to separate them from others of the family in IL and other locations with same names and, because a lot of this isn't recorded in a complete chapter in one place on paper; it's in my head. Thanks for putting up with me, guys.When they were young, the Crumbaugh boys spent a lot of time with the grandparents, Solomon and Mary, who spoke some German at home. One of the boys took apart grandma Mary's bell. She told them to put the clabber (clapper) back in the bell. So they went to the dairy and put some clabber in the bell. At the beginning of the war,John Henry C. and David Burnett C. got a four month vacation at Camp Chase in Columbus, OH. David C. had graduated from Georgetown College and really did have an older sister and brother-in-law living in Spring Creek Township, Phillips County Arkansas between Helena and Marvell. they are listed in the 1850 census for both Scott Co., KY and Phillips Co., AR. Orpha Crumbaugh Threlkeld and her husband David also owned some property in MS so it's possible that John Henry C. could have been going there to manage it. Both of these plus Thornton F J and and Albert H G Crumbaugh later enlisted in the Confederate Cavalry at Lexington, KY in October of 1862. Finally made it down there in the spring of 2010. Only took me a half century to get back to where I knew they had started from.
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2014
  18. M E Wolf

    M E Wolf Brigadier General Moderator

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    [Reference Post #16]

    Lucky the Crumbaugh name found its way into the Official Records of the Rebellion -- period.

    The first 128 volumes really are the cream on top of the volumes of reports and such. There is a hard book 128 volume supplemental on top of the Original "Official Records of the Rebellion" but so expensive, have to be rich to afford the whole 128 volumes of these supplementals and, they aren't on CD-ROMs.

    In addition, the "Preface" to the Original Records of the Rebellion, admittedly states that so many of the documents for the Confederacy were destroyed, taken off with, etc., that it is impossible to get the impact of all these missing documents. What is enjoyable though, so many former Confederate Generals and Jefferson Davis, donated their papers to add to these "Official Records of the Rebellion." Where family history and letters come in, is very important --fill in the blanks.

    I wager that it would have to be approximately 360 volumes in addition to the supplemental records, as to get down to the Company records of all the armies. National Archives has what it has. But, every once in a while, you see someone's documents from that period of time on E-bay for sale. Wish I had the luxury and purse to purchase all these documents for future preservation.

    I'm sure there has to be more. Do go into Researching your Ancestors Forum; as there are top notch researchers who can pull a lot of information in addition to what I've found.

    M. E. Wolf
     
  19. realevergreen

    realevergreen Private

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    You are so right about being lucky. I have been chasing family history for about 25 years off and on- with a lot of off. With the family trait of perseverance(stubborness) well ingrained. Luck. An early family relative put together a lot of this in the early 1920's and it ended up in the genealogy section of the Crumbaugh Memorial Library at LeRoy, IL. Eight out of eleven branches of the family had either that whole family here or a part of their family here in the 1800's and this member went to Ohio, Maryland, Kentucky to visit other living family members. Lester Horowitz wrote The Longest Raid after buying and fixing up an old Ohio house and finding out that it was along John Morgan's route in Ohio. I talked to him before buying his book, which is very good. I mentioned that I really needed a regimental list worse than I needed another book on the crowded shelves. He was good enough to send me one from a now deceased Kentucky aquaintance. Yes, the bad little Crumbaugh boys were really just ordinary people doing what they believed was right and happened to be at the right place and time to be close enough to reach out and touch history. But, on the other hand, many of the people mentioned on here were the kind of unknown, unheralded people who go to work, pay the bills, oil the gears and keep things running. These are the people that keep this country going through thick and thin. So, maybe they need a little recognition as well.
     
  20. kholland

    kholland Brigadier General Moderator Trivia Game Winner Forum Host

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    Welcome to our forum-best place to find out info.
     

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