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Hand Salute

Discussion in 'Reenactors Forum' started by Smoothbore62, Feb 14, 2012.

  1. Smoothbore62

    Smoothbore62 Private

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    I'm not terribly sure if this is the right place for this, if not feel free to move it. The question is, What is the proper way to render a hand salute to a superior officer? Is it the way the armed forces do it now, or is it the palm out British style?

    Bobby Bivins
    48th Tennessee Infantry (Nixon's)
     

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  3. johan_steele

    johan_steele Lt. Colonel Retired Moderator

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    Palm out though w/ less snap. The manual was more fluid w/ little snap during the ACW.
     
  4. Poor Private

    Poor Private First Sergeant

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    Yep palm out the the brits.
     
  5. rhp6033

    rhp6033 Sergeant Major

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    Any idea when it changed?
     
  6. johan_steele

    johan_steele Lt. Colonel Retired Moderator

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    The Prussian influnce of the 1870's.
     
  7. rhp6033

    rhp6033 Sergeant Major

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    That makes sense. It's funny how our military wear and customs resembled British, then French design until France lost in the Franco-Persian war, then made a temporary departure into Prussian influences before reverting back to British influences around the turn of the century.

    It was worse in China - in the 1920's they had a contract with Germany to train and provide some equipment to small numbers of the Nationalist armed forces. There are pictures of Chinese soldiers in German coal-shuttle helmets. This changed as political alliances changed in the 1930's, however.
     
  8. M E Wolf

    M E Wolf Brigadier General Moderator

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    Salutations according to the 1861 Revised Regulations for the Army of the United States
    Article XXIX
    Section: 253. It is equally the duty of non-commissioned officers and soldiers at all times and in all situations, to pay pthe proper compliments to officers of the navy and marines, and to officers of other geiments, when in uniform, as to officers of their own particular gegiments and corps.

    254. Courtesy among military men is indispensable to discipline. Respect to superiors will not be confined to obedience on duty, but will be extended to all occasions. It is always the duty of the inferior to accost or to offer first the customary salutation, and of the superior to return such complimentary notice.

    255. Sergeants, with swords drawn, will salute by bringing them to present -- with muskets, by bringing the left hand across the body, as to strike the musket near the right shoulder. Corporals out of the ranks and privates not sentries, will carry their muskets at a shoulder as the sergeants, and salute in like manner.

    256. When a soldier without arms, or with side arms only, meets an officer, he is to raise his hand to the right side of the visor of his cap, palm to the front, elbow raised as high as the shoulder, looking at the same time in a respectful and soldier-like manner at the officer, who will return the compliment thus offered.

    257. A non-commissioned officer or soldier being seated, and without particular occupation, will rise on the approach of an officer, and make the customary salutation. If standing, he will turn toward the officer for the same purpose. If the parties remain in the same place or on the same ground, shuch compliments need not be repeated.

    [Typed word for word from the Regulations] The Confederate version issued in 1863, is word for word in this regard/topic of salutations (salutes).

    M. E. Wolf
     
  9. Smoothbore62

    Smoothbore62 Private

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    Thanks alot, these are great replies. The quotations from the Regulations is very helpfull.

    Bobby Bivins
    48th Tennessee Infantry (Nixon's)
     
  10. Jojotater

    Jojotater Private

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    I sure learn a lot from you folks. It's great to learn.
     
  11. Poor Private

    Poor Private First Sergeant

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    Now someone who has the regs handy inform the participants here, how to salute when carrying a musket. This would be good info to pass along as well.
     
  12. Republican Blues

    Republican Blues Sergeant Major

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    255. Sergeants, with swords drawn, will salute by bringing them to present -- with muskets, by bringing the left hand across the body, as to strike the musket near the right shoulder. Corporals out of the ranks and privates not sentries, will carry their muskets at a shoulder as the sergeants, and salute in like manner. This was in the above quote of the regulations posted earlier.
     
  13. Poor Private

    Poor Private First Sergeant

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    Well dohh (gives self a head slap). I read the thread and post while trying to do 3 things at once at work. Sorry about the duplication of the answer.
     
  14. M E Wolf

    M E Wolf Brigadier General Moderator

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    Poor Private, sir;

    You wrote:
    Seems you need a few pards to help you out so you wouldn't have to multi-task. :smile:

    If I am tardy in a response to any other questions, please private message me so I can be alerted to the inquiry. I have a nice small collection of books that may have an answer.

    You do realize, that many of these manuals are on-line true? If you know the title of the book, e.g. 1861 Revised Regulations for the Army of the United States, 1863 Regulations for the Army of the Confederate States, etc. If I have it and can type it out, I shall continue to do so.

    M. E. Wolf
     
  15. M E Wolf

    M E Wolf Brigadier General Moderator

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    Salutations according to the 1863 Regulations for the Army of the Confederate States
    Article XXVIII

    Section: 240. It is equally the duty of non-commissioned officers and soldiers at all times and in all situations, to pay pthe proper compliments to officers of the navy and marines, and to officers of other geiments, when in uniform, as to officers of their own particular gegiments and corps.

    241. Courtesy among military men is indispensable to discipline. Respect to superiors will not be confined to obedience on duty, but will be extended to all occasions. It is always the duty of the inferior to accost or to offer first the customary salutation, and of the superior to return such complimentary notice.

    242. Sergeants, with swords drawn, will salute by bringing them to present -- with muskets, by bringing the left hand across the body, as to strike the musket near the right shoulder. Corporals out of the ranks and privates not sentries, will carry their muskets at a shoulder as the sergeants, and salute in like manner.

    243. When a soldier without arms, or with side arms only, meets an officer, he is to raise his hand to the right side of the visor of his cap, palm to the front, elbow raised as high as the shoulder, looking at the same time in a respectful and soldier-like manner at the officer, who will return the compliment thus offered.

    244. A non-commissioned officer or soldier being seated, and without particular occupation, will rise on the approach of an officer, and make the customary salutation. If standing, he will turn toward the officer for the same purpose. If the parties remain in the same place or on the same ground, shuch compliments need not be repeated.

    M. E. Wolf
     
  16. Republican Blues

    Republican Blues Sergeant Major

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    Hate when that happens LOL:D
     
    M E Wolf likes this.
  17. M E Wolf

    M E Wolf Brigadier General Moderator

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    64th_Illinois_Co_B;

    Sir, you wrote:
    Me too!!!!!!!!!!!! :mad::furious::banghead: ((Yes, I had to have an excuse to try these little icon do-hickies out LOL)

    What fries me, is when I am doing handwritten projects, get distracted and 'mess up.' I can't edit it like a computer. I have to write the whoooooooooooooooooooole thing all over again. I know to make plenty of spares or order them.

    M. E. Wolf
     

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