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Frederick Douglass

Discussion in 'Civil War History - General Discussion' started by gem, Feb 15, 2013.

  1. gem

    gem First Sergeant

    Joined:
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    1,503
    Is it proper to honor Frederick Douglass?

     

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  3. damYankee

    damYankee Sergeant Major Forum Host

    Joined:
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    Silly question. Why would we not honor a person who rose from slave to educated writer and speaker and a leader.
     
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  4. Nathanb1

    Nathanb1 Brigadier General Moderator Forum Host

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    Location:
    Smack dab in the heart of Texas
    Yes. Why not?
     
  5. patbold

    patbold Private

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2011
    Messages:
    110
    Location:
    Davenport, Ia
    I'd rather honor Frederick Douglas than honor what seems to be your 2 favorites. At least he did something to help the plight of his people. And he didn't spill any innocent blood doing it.
     
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  6. gem

    gem First Sergeant

    Joined:
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    What I admire most about Douglass is that he was self taught. Few can match his incredible writing style despite all the education in the world.

    Its true that he did not spill blood but he supported servile insurrections in his only fictional work the 'Heroic Slave' Thus I would ask if one can truly dissociate someone's actions from their thoughts.

    In that that work slavery was portrayed as distinctively unAmerican and thus the protagonist was considered heroic rather than a killer for revolting. By aligning the goals of the slave with that of the American revolution the protagonist was hailed as a revoltionary.

    Writes Douglass:

    "God is my witness that LIBERTY, not malice, is the motive for this night's work. I have done no more to those dead men yonder, than they would have done to me in like circumstances. We have struck for our freedom, and if a true man's heart be in you, you win honor us for the deed. We have done that which you applaud your fathers [referring to the founding fathers - Gem] for doing, and if we are murderers, so were they."
     
  7. damYankee

    damYankee Sergeant Major Forum Host

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    Douglas resisted those in the movement like Brown who our of frustration turned to violence. I believe that the fugitive slave act caused the violent backlash that ended up dragging us into the darkness of civil war.
     
  8. gem

    gem First Sergeant

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    Oct 26, 2012
    Messages:
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    He didn't act on it with Brown as he knew it was going to end badly. However, that doesn't mean he didn't endorse the idea of servile insurrections, which clearly he did in the Heroic Slave.

    If we had been through what Douglass had, I doubt many us would go into the slaveholding south regardless of our view on the righteousness of insurrections.
     
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  9. gem

    gem First Sergeant

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    One of the things I'm reminded of is that one of the participants in John Brown's raid was a free black man whose wife was enslaved. A similar concept exists in Douglass's the Heroic Slave. The protagonist had gained his freedom by running away but his wife was still enslaved. Thus, he felt compelled to go back and try to free her. It brings up an important point that we often don't think about which is even if a slave were able to run away their family would still be left in slavery.
     
  10. Freddy

    Freddy 2nd Lieutenant

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2006
    Messages:
    3,013
    Location:
    Worcester, MA
    Douglass lectured extensively from 1841-1845 in New England, NY, PA, OH, IN


    1842
    5-6 January:
    Worcester, Massachusetts: Annual Meeting of the
    Worcester County South Division Anti-Slavery
    Society.
    7 January:
    Barre, Massachusetts: Town Hall: Worcester County
    North Division Anti-Slavery Society.
    26-28 January:
    Boston, Massachusetts: Melodeon: Annual Meeting of
    the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society.
    28 January:
    Boston, Massachusetts: Faneuil Hall.
    8-9 February:
    Andover, Massachusetts: Methodist Meeting-house:
    Essex County Anti-Slavery Society.
    16 February:
    Hubbardston, Massachusetts: Worcester County
    North Division Anti-Slavery Society.
    25 March:
    South Scituate, Massachusetts: Quarterly Meeting of
    the Plymouth County Anti-Slavery Society.
    31 March:
    Groton, Massachusetts.
    1 April:
    Harvard, Massachusetts: Harvard Anti-Slavery
    Society.
    2 April:
    Dedham, Massachusetts.
    3 April:
    Bolton, Massachusetts.
    4-5 April:
    Lanesborough, Massachusetts.
    6 April:
    Westborough, Massachusetts.
    7 April:
    Upton, Massachusetts: Upton Female Anti-Slavery
    Society.
    8 April:
    Milford, Massachusetts.
    9 April:
    Medway, Massachusetts.
    10 April:
    Bellingham, Massachusetts.
    11 April:
    Franklin, Massachusetts.
    12 April:
    Wrentham, Massachusetts.
    13 April:
    Foxboro, Massachusetts.
    14 April:
    Sharon, Massachusetts.
    15 April:
    Canton, Massachusetts.
    -295-​
    23 April:
    Canton, Massachusetts.
    23 April:
    Medfield, Massachusetts (evening lecture).
    24 April:
    Dedham, Massachusetts.
    24 April:
    Medway, Massachusetts (evening lecture).
    25 April:
    Dover, Massachusetts.
    25 April:
    Medfield, Massachusetts (evening lecture).
    26 April:
    Needham, Massachusetts.
    26 April:
    Lexington, Massachusetts: Baptist Meeting-house:
    Middlesex County Anti-Slavery Society.
    27 April:
    Natick, Massachusetts.
    27 April:
    Malden, Massachusetts (evening lecture).
    28 April:
    Sherburne, Massachusetts.
    28 April:
    Medford, Massachusetts (evening lecture).
    29 April:
    Hopkinton, Massachusetts.
    29 April:
    Woburn, Massachusetts (evening lecture).
    30 April:
    Grafton, Massachusetts.
    30 April:
    Stoneham, Massachusetts (evening lecture).

    Locations also Visited in April (From the "Treasurer's Account" in
    Liberator, 13 May 1842: 75):

    Weymouth, Massachusetts.

    Fairhaven, Massachusetts.

    Mattapoisett, Massachusetts.

    Westport, Massachusetts.

    Assonett, Massachusetts.

    North Rochester, Massachusetts.
    1 May:​
    Millbury, Massachusetts.
    1 May:​
    Stoneham, Massachusetts (evening lecture).
    2 May:​
    Auburn, Massachusetts.
    2 May:​
    South Reading, Massachusetts (evening lecture).
    3 May:​
    Oxford, Massachusetts.
    4 May:​
    Charlton, Massachusetts.
    5 May:​
    Sturbridge, Massachusetts.
    6 May:​
    Southbridge, Massachusetts.
    7 May:​
    Dudley, Massachusetts.
    8 May:​
    Webster, Massachusetts.
    10-13 May:​
    New York, New York: Broadway Tabernacle: Annual
    Meeting of the American Anti-Slavery Society.
    24-27 May:​
    Boston, Massachusetts: Chardon Street Chap-el:
    Annual Meeting of the New England Anti-Slavery
    Society.
    3 June:​
    Northbridge, Massachusetts: Congregational Church.
    5 June:​
    Millville, Massachusetts: Rev. Stacy's Church.
    6 June:​
    Northbridge, Massachusetts.
    9 June:​
    Northbridge, Massachusetts.
    16 June:​
    Barnstable, Massachusetts: Non-Resistance Meeting:
    With Garrison.
    17 June:​
    Yarmouth Port, Massachusetts: Anti-Slavery Meeting:
    With Garrison and George Bradburn.
    18 June:​
    Centreville, Massachusetts: Anti-Slavery Meeting:
    With Garrison and Bradburn.
    19 June:​
    Osterville, Massachusetts: Non-Resistance Meeting:
    With Garrison and Bradburn.
    20 June:​
    Hyannis, Massachusetts: Anti-Slavery Meeting: With
    Garrison, Bradburn, and Henry C. Wright.
    21 June:​
    North Dennis, Massachusetts: Non-Resistance
    Meeting: With Garrison, Bradburn, and Wright.
    22 June:​
    Brewster, Massachusetts: Anti-Slavery Meeting: With
    Garrison, Bradburn, and Wright.
    1-3 August:​
    Norristown, Pennsylvania: Annual Meeting of the
    Eastern Pennsylvania Anti-Slavery Society.
    8-9 August:​
    New Bedford, Massachusetts: Bristol County Anti-
    Slavery Society.
    10-15 August:​
    Nantucket, Massachusetts: The Great Hall,
    Atheneum: Anti-Slavery Convention.

    -297-​
    c. 16-17 August:​
    Sutton and Grafton, Massachusetts: Anti-Slavery
    Lectures.
    21 August:​
    Lynn, Massachusetts: Lyceum Hall: Non-resistance
    Meeting.
    26-27 August:​
    Rochester, New York: With Abby Kelley, Erasmus D.
    Hudson, and John A. Collins.
    30 August:​
    Genesee, New York: With Kelley and Collins.
    2-3 September:​
    Victor, New York: With Kelley, Collins, and Hudson.
    6 September:​
    Pen Yan, New York: With Kelley and Collins.
    9-10 September:​
    Palmyra, New York: With Kelley, Collins, and Hudson.
    13-14 September:​
    Ithaca, New York: With Kelley, Collins, and Hudson.
    16 September:​
    Waterloo, New York: With Kelley and Hudson.
    20 September:​
    Millport, New York: With Kelley.
    23 September:​
    Ledyard, New York: With Kelley.
    26-27 September:​
    Port Byron, New York: With Kelley.
    29-30 September:​
    Cato Four Corners, New York: With Kelley and
    Hudson.
    4-5 October:​
    Cortland, New York: With Kelley and Collins.
    5-6 October:​
    Syracuse, New York: Liberty Party Convention: With
    Hudson, Collins, and J.N.T. Tucker.
    7-8 October:​
    Syracuse, New York: With Kelley, Collins, Tucker, and
    Hudson.
    11 October:​
    Oxford, New York.
    14 October:​
    Pulaski, New York.
    18 October:​
    Cazenovia, New York.
    21 October:​
    Rome, New York.
    25 October:​
    Cooperstown, New York.
    30 October:​
    Boston, Massachusetts: Faneuil Hall: Latimer Meeting.
    1-8 November:​
    New Bedford, Massachusetts: Latimer Meet-ings: With
    Charles Lenox Remond.
    4 November:​
    New Bedford, Massachusetts: Universalist Society
    Meetinghouse: Latimer Meeting.
    -298-​
    6 November:
    New Bedford, Massachusetts: Town Hall: Latimer
    Meeting.
    6-18 November:
    Providence, Rhode Island: Town Hall: Annual Meeting
    of the Rhode Island Anti-Slavery Society.
    21 November:
    Salem, Massachusetts: Mechanics' Hall: Latimer
    Meeting: With Remond and George Latimer.
    26-27 November:
    Essex, Massachusetts: Universalist Meeting-house:
    Essex County Anti-Slavery Society.
    December:
    Douglass lecturing in Rhode Island.
    1843

    25-27 January:
    Boston, Massachusetts: Faneuil Hall: Annual Meeting
    to the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society.
    28-31 January:
    Lynn, Massachusetts: Society of Universal Inquiry and
    Reform (Met through 2 February).
    1-2 February:
    Princeton, Massachusetts: Annual Meeting of the
    Worcester County North Division Anti-Slavery
    Society.
    19 February:
    Providence, Rhode Island: Franklin Hall: Lecture on
    Slavery under auspices of the Rhode Island Anti-
    Slavery Society.
    26 February:
    Providence, Rhode Island: Westminster Hall: Lecture
    on Slavery under the auspices of the Rhode Island
    Anti-Slavery Society.
    5 March:
    Providence, Rhode Island: Franklin Hall: Lecture on
    Slavery under the auspices of the Rhode Island Anti-
    Slavery Society.
    6 March:
    Boston, Massachusetts: Armory Hall: Boston Female
    Anti-Slavery Society: Lecture: "Slavery, as actually
    existing at the South."
    9-11 March:
    Lynn, Massachusetts: Silsbee Street Chapel:
    Quarterly Meeting of the Essex County Anti-Slavery
    Society.
    18 March:
    Providence, Rhode Island: Rhode Island Anti-Slavery
    Society: Executive Committee Meeting.
    -299-​
    19 March:
    Providence, Rhode Island: Franklin Hall: Lecture on
    Slavery under the auspices of the Rhode Island Anti-
    Slavery Society.
    26 March:
    Providence, Rhode Island: Lecture: "Colonization and
    its connexion with slavery, and the degradation of the
    colored people of the United States" under the aus-
    pices of the Rhode Island Anti-Slavery Society.
    2 April:
    Providence, Rhode Island: Lecture: "The Progress of
    the Cause" under the auspices of the Rhode Island
    Anti-Slavery Society.
    12-13 April:
    East Greenwich, Rhode Island: Rhode Island Anti-
    Slavery Society.
    20 April:
    Dedham, Massachusetts: Town Hall: Annual Meeting
    of the Norfolk County Anti-Slavery Society.
    24-25 April:
    Lowell, Massachusetts: Appleton Street Church: Anti-
    Slavery Lectures with Remond and Latimer.
    9-11 May:
    New York, New York: Apollo Saloon: Annual Meeting
    of the American Anti-Slavery Society.
    14 May:
    Hartford, Connecticut: Gilman's Hall: Anti-Slavery
    Lecture.
    15-16 May:
    Hartford, Connecticut: Connecticut Anti-Slavery
    Society.
    30 May-1 June:
    Boston, Massachusetts: Faneuil Hall, Miller
    Tabernacle: Annual Meeting of the New England Anti-
    Slavery Society.
    7-9 June:
    Concord, New Hampshire: Annual Meeting of the New
    Hampshire Anti-Slavery Society.
    14 June:
    Lunenburg, Massachusetts: Worcester County North
    Division Anti-Slavery Society: With Remond and
    Cyrus M. Burleigh.
    19 June:
    Fall River, Massachusetts: Anti-Slavery Lecture.
    20-21 June:
    New Bedford, Massachusetts: Town Hall: Bristol
    County Anti-Slavery Convention.
    23-25 June:
    Nantucket, Massachusetts: Atheneum Hall: Anti-
    Slavery Convention.
    27 June:
    Fall River, Massachusetts: Columbian Hall: Anti-
    Slavery Convention: With Remond and Burleigh.
    -300-​
    4 July:
    Kingston, Massachusetts: Town Hall: Annual Meeting
    of the Plymouth County Anti-Slavery Society: With
    Remond and Sydney Howard Gay.
    13-14 July:
    Middlebury, Vermont: With Bradburn and Collins.
    17-18 July:
    Ferrisburg, Vermont: With Bradburn and Collins.
    27 July:
    Utica, New York: With Bradburn and Collins.
    30 July-2 August:
    Syracuse, New York: With Collins, Remond, and
    Kelley.
    3-6 August:
    Rochester, New York: Bethel Church: Annual Meeting
    of the American Anti-Slavery Society of Western New
    York: With Bradburn, Collins, and Jacob Ferris.
    7 August:
    Buffalo, New York: With Bradburn.
    8-9 August:
    Buffalo, New York: Douglass Conducting Anti-Slavery
    Meetings.
    10-14 August:
    Buffalo, New York: Conducting Anti-Slavery Meetings:
    With Remond.
    15-19 August:
    Buffalo, New York: National Convention of Colored
    Citizens of the United States: With Remond.
    20 August-
    September 1:
    Buffalo-Rochester, New York, Area: Conducting Anti-
    Slavery Meetings with Remond.
    7 September:
    Oakland, Ohio: With Remond.
    11-12 September:
    Cambridge, Indiana: With Bradburn and White.
    c. 13 September:
    Richmond, Indiana: With Bradburn and White.
    15-16 September:
    Pendleton, Indiana: With Bradburn and White.
    17 September:
    Noblesville, Indiana: With Bradburn and White.
    21-23 September:
    Jonesboro, Indiana: Annual Meeting of the Indiana
    Anti-Slavery Society: With James Monroe, Gay,
    Bradburn, Remond, and White.
    24 September-
    End of October:
    Clinton County, Ohio.
    30-31 October:
    Lloydsville, Ohio: With Remond, Gay, and Monroe.
    c. 1 November:
    New Lisbon, Ohio: With Remond, Gay, and Monroe.
    3-4 November:
    New Brighton, Pennsylvania.
    -301-​
    c. 6-13 November:
    Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania: With Remond, Gay,
    Monroe, White, and Bradburn.
    c. 16 November:
    Fallston, Pennsylvania.
    25 November:j
    West Chester, Pennsylvania: With White and Bradburn.
    4-7 December:
    Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Second Independent
    Universalist Church: Tenth Anniversary of the
    American Anti-Slavery Society.
    1844

    24-26 January:
    Boston, Massachusetts: Faneuil Hall: Annual Meeting
    of the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society.
    11 February:
    Concord, New Hampshire: Court House: Douglass
    Presented Afternoon and Evening Anti-Slavery
    Lectures.
    12-19 February:
    Bradford, New London, Henniker, Milford, Nashua,
    New-Market, Dover, and Great Falls: With Pillsbury.
    20 February:
    Concord, New Hampshire: Court Room: Anti-Slavery
    Lecture.
    22-23
    February: Lowell, Massachusetts: With Pillsbury, Collins,
    William Lloyd Garrison, William A. White, Nathaniel
    P. Rogers, and Lunsford Lane.
    24 February:
    Groton, Massachusetts: With White, Pillsbury, and
    Lane.
    26-27 February:
    Townsend, Massachusetts: With White and Lane.
    1-2 March:
    Bedford, Massachusetts: With Lane and Latimer.
    3 March:
    Concord, New Hampshire: Anti-Slavery Lecture
    4 March:
    Sudbury, Massachusetts: With Latimer and Lane.
    6-7 March:
    Framingham, Massachusetts: With Lane, Garrison,
    and James N. Buffum.
    8 March:
    Needham, Massachusetts: With Lane.
    11 March:
    Medford, Massachusetts: With Lane, Pillsbury, and
    Wendell Phillips.
    13-14 March:
    Waltham, Massachusetts: With Pillsbury and White.
    15-16 March:
    Dorchester, Massachusetts: With Pillsbury and White.
    -302-​
    18-19 March:
    Dedham, Massachusetts: With Pillsbury, White,
    Garrison.
    20-21 March:
    Braintree, Massachusetts: With Pillsbury and White.
    22-23 March:
    Foxboro, Massachusetts: With Pillsbury and White.
    24 March:
    Walpole, Massachusetts: With Pillsbury.
    25-26 March:
    Medway, Massachusetts: With Pillsbury and White.
    27-28 March:
    Wrentham, Massachusetts: With Pillsbury and White.
    29-31 March:
    Pawtucket, Massachusetts: With Stephen S. Foster
    and Burleigh.
    1-2 April:
    Westminster, Massachusetts: With Pillsbury and
    White.
    3 April:
    Leominster, Massachusetts: 3 April With Pillsbury and
    White.
    4 April:
    Essex, Massachusetts: Quarterly Meeting of the Essex
    County Anti-Slavery Society: With Remond and
    Foster.
    5-6 April:
    Fitchburg, Massachusetts: With Hudson, Gay, and
    Kelley.
    8-9 April:
    Ashburnham, Massachusetts: With Hudson, Gay, and
    Kelley.
    10-11 April:
    Gardner, Massachusetts: With Hudson, Gay, and
    Kelley.
    12-13 April:
    Hubbardston, Massachusetts: With Hudson, Gay, and
    Kelley.
    15-16 April:
    Petersham, Massachusetts: With Hudson, Gay, and
    Kelley.
    17-18 April:
    Athol, Massachusetts: With Hudson, Gay, and Kelley.
    25-27 April:
    Lynn, Massachusetts: With Buffum, Foster, Garrison,
    and Remond.
    28 April:
    Northampton, Massachusetts: Dining Room at the
    Association of Education and Industry: Sunday
    Morning Anti-Slavery Lecture.
    28 April:
    Northampton, Massachusetts: Town Hall: Sunday
    Evening Anti-Slavery Lecture.
    -303-
    29-30 April:
    Pittsfield, Massachusetts: With Hudson, Gay, and
    Kelley.
    1-2 May:
    Lenox, Massachusetts: With Hudson, Gay, and Kelley.
    3-4 May:
    Stockbridge, Massachusetts: With Hudson, Gay, and
    Kelley.
    7-10 May:
    New York, New York: Apollo Hall, Concert Hall:
    Annual Meeting of the American Anti-Slavery Society.
    28, 29, 31 May:
    Boston, Massachusetts: Marlboro Chapel: Annual
    Meeting of the New England Anti-Slavery Society.
    June:
    Hallowell, Maine: Town Hall: Anti-Slavery Lecture.
    12-13 June:
    Concord, Massachusetts:, Universalist Church:
    Middlesex County Anti-Slavery Society.
    26-28 July:
    Nashua, New Hampshire: Anti-Slavery Meeting.
    1 August:
    Concord, Massachusetts: Court House: 1st of August
    Celebration.
    12-16 August:
    Norristown, Pennsylvania: Baptist Church: Annual
    Meeting of the Eastern Pennsylvania Anti-Slavery
    Society: With Garrison, Remond, and Buffum.
    17 August:
    Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: State House Yard: Anti-
    Slavery Meeting.
    19 August:
    Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Gardiner's Church: With
    Remond.
    22 August:
    West Chester, Pennsylvania: Market House: Anti-
    Slavery Meeting: With Remond.
    24 August:
    Oxford, Pennsylvania: Friend's Meetinghouse:
    Clarkson Anti-Slavery Society: With Remond.
    25 August:
    London Grove, Pennsylvania: Outside Friend's
    Meetinghouse: Anti-Slavery Meeting: With Remond.
    27-28 August:
    Marlboro, Pennsylvania: Friend's Meeting-house:
    Annual Meeting of the Chester County Anti-Slavery
    Society: With Remond.
    30 August:
    Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Wilbur Fisk Hall: Anti-
    Slavery Meeting: With Remond.
    31 August:
    Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Clarkson Hall: Anti-
    Slavery Meeting: With Remond.
    -304-​
    1 September:
    Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Gardiner's Church: Anti-
    Slavery Meeting: With Remond.
    1 September:
    Byberry, Pennsylvania: Friend's Meetinghouse: Anti-
    Slavery Meeting: With Remond.
    15-30 September:
    New Hampshire and Maine: With Kelley, Foster,
    Pillsbury, Remond, and J.M. Spear.
    19-20 October:
    New Bedford, Massachusetts: Liberty Hall: Bristol
    County Anti-Slavery Society.
    22-23 October:
    New Bedford, Massachusetts: Liberty Party Meeting:
    With Remond.
    24 October:
    New Bedford, Massachusetts: Liberty Hall: With
    Remond.
    3 November:
    Salem, Massachusetts: Mechanics' Hall: Salem Female
    Anti-Slavery Society.
    4-5 November:
    Marblehead, Massachusetts: Quarterly Meeting of the
    Essex County Anti-Slavery Society.
    20-23 November:
    Providence, Rhode Island: Mechanics' Hall: Annual
    Meeting of the Rhode Island Anti-Slavery Society.
    26 November:
    Cambridgeport, Massachusetts: Town Hall: Middlesex County Anti-Slavery Society.
    21-22 December:
    Portsmouth, New Hampshire: Ladies Anti-Slavery
    Society: Anti-Slavery Lectures.
    1845
    January:
    New Hampshire Lecture Tour: With Foster.
    24-26 January:
    Boston, Massachusetts: Marlboro Chapel, Hall of the
    House of Representatives: Annual Meeting of the
    Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society.
    14-16 February:
    Cornish, New Hampshire: Anti-Slavery Meetings:
    With Remond, Foster, and Charles C. Burleigh.
    17-18 February:
    Claremont, New Hampshire: Anti-Slavery Meetings:
    With Remond, Foster, and Burleigh.
    8-9 March:
    New Bedford, Massachusetts: Liberty Hall: Anti-
    Slavery Meetings.
    18 March:
    Worcester, Massachusetts: Brinley Hall: Quarterly Meeting of the Worcester County South Division Anti-Slavery Society.

    -305-​
    19-20 April:
    Manchester, Massachusetts: Dodge's Hall: Annual
    Meeting of the Essex County Anti-Slavery Society.
    24 April:
    Dedham, Massachusetts: Town Hall: Annual Meeting
    of the Norfolk County Anti-Slavery Society.
    6-8 May:
    New York, New York: Broadway Tabernacle, Minerva
    Rooms: Annual Meeting of the American Anti-Slavery
    Society.
    25 May:
    New Bedford, Massachusetts: Liberty Hall: Anti-
    Slavery Meeting: With Remond.
    27-29 May:
    Boston, Massachusetts: Marlboro Chapel: Annual
    Meeting of the New England Anti-Slavery Society.
    4-6 June:
    Concord, New Hampshire: Town Hall, Unitarian
    Church, North Church, State House Yard: Annual
    Meeting of the New Hampshire Anti-Slavery Society.
    7 June:
    Springfield, Massachusetts: Anti-Slavery Lec-tures.
    9 June:
    Albany, New York: City Hall: Anti-Slavery Lecture.
    14-15 June:
    Georgetown, Massachusetts: Savory Hall: Annual
    Meeting of the Essex County Anti-Slavery Society.
    25-26 June:
    Uxbridge, Massachusetts: Unitarian Meeting-house:
    Quarterly Meeting of the Worcester County South
    Division Anti-Slavery Society.
    1 July:
    Worcester, Massachusetts.
    2 July:
    Holden, Massachusetts.
    3 July:
    Westminster, Massachusetts.
    4-5 July:
    Athol, Massachusetts.
    6 July:
    Hubardstown, Massachusetts.
    7 July:
    Princeton, Massachusetts.
    8 July:
    Barre, Massachusetts.
    10 July:
    West Brookfield, Massachusetts.
    11 July:
    South Wilbraham, Massachusetts.
    12 July:
    Albany, New York.
    13 July:
    Troy, New York.
    14 July:
    West Winfield, New York: Baptist Church.
    -306-​
    15 July:
    Utica, New York.
    16 July:
    Rome, New York.
    17 July:
    Syracuse, New York.
    18 July:
    Skaneateles, New York.
    19-20 July:
    Waterloo, New York.
    21-22 July:
    Palmyra, New York.
    23-24 July:
    Rochester, New York.
    30-31 July:
    Buffalo, New York: Talman Hall.
    7 August:
    Weymouth, Massachusetts.
    8 August:
    Hingham, Massachusetts.
    9 August:
    Kingston, Massachusetts.
    10 August:
    Dukesbury, Massachusetts.
    13 August:
    New Bedford, Massachusetts: Town Hall: Jonathan
    Walker Meeting.
    15 August:
    Lynn, Massachusetts: Lyceum Hall: Farewell Meeting
    for Buffum and Douglass.
    16 August:
    Sails from Boston aboard Cambria bound for
    Liverpool, England: With Buffum.
    -307-​
     
  11. Freddy

    Freddy 2nd Lieutenant

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    WestSideofPark.jpg Hotel Kirby.JPG
    Douglass came to lecture at my home town of Grafton, MA on several occasions. He wrote about his first visit to Grafton.

    Frederick Douglass on April 30, 1842 at 7:00 PM spoke at the Evangelical Congregational Church on the Town Common in Grafton, MA. Reverend Thomas Biscoe allowed Douglass to speak to a few hundred people inside the church and within a year the congregation voted slavery to be a sin and raised money for the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society.

    http://www.uccgrafton.com/ourhistory.htm

    Douglass wrote in his, My Bondage, and My Freedom:

    “As a general rule there was in New England after 1840, little difficulty in obtaining suitable places where I could plead the cause of my people. The abolitionists had passed the Red Sea of mobs and had conquered the right to a respectful hearing. I, however, found several towns in which the people closed their doors and refused to entertain the subject. Notably among these was Hartford, Conn., and Grafton, Mass. In the former place Messrs. Garrison, Hudson, Foster, Abby Kelley and myself determined to hold our meetings under the open sky, which we did in a little court under the eaves of the "sanctuary" ministered unto by the Rev. Dr. Hawes, with much satisfaction to ourselves, and I think with advantage to our cause.

    In Grafton I was alone, and there was neither house, hall, church, nor market-place in which I could speak to the people; but, determined to speak, I went to the hotel and borrowed a dinner-bell, with which in hand I passed through the principal streets, ringing the bell and crying out, "Notice! Frederick Douglass, recently a slave, will lecture on American Slavery, on Grafton Common, this evening, at 7 o'clock. Those who would like to hear of the workings of slavery by one of the slaves are respectfully invited to attend." This notice brought out a large audience, after which the largest church in town was open to me.

    Only in one instance was I compelled to pursue this course thereafter, and that was in Manchester, N. H., and my labors there were followed by similar results. When people found that I would be heard, they saw it was the part of wisdom to open the way for me.”
     
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  12. Georgia Coast

    Georgia Coast Sergeant

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    I've always admired him tremendously. The dude was FIERCE -- check out how his look matches those of these soldiers. And I know two of his sons did serve with the 54th. I don't know if both were at Battery Wagner, but at least one was and survived.

    One of my favorite stories is when he and Sojourner were sharing a platform in 1847 and he spoke of his despair and his feeling that slavery could only end in bloodshed. She turned to him and said, "Frederick, is God dead?"

    I always liked this story, thought it was inspirational, but when I just now looked it up, I realized that what he goes on to say is more disturbing, and in fact supports Gem's point about Douglas's sympathies:

    "No," I answered, "and because God is not dead slavery can only end in blood." My quaint old sister was of the Garrison school of non-resistance, and was shocked at my sanguinary doctrine, but she too became an advocate of the sword, when the war for the maintenance of the Union was declared.
     

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  13. Freddy

    Freddy 2nd Lieutenant

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    Both Lewis and Charles Douglass survived their service with the 54th MA Volunteer Infantry. Actually, Charles was discharged from the 54th due to illness without taking to the field. He later joined the 5th MA Cavalry.
     
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