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Former slave cabins to be turned into rentals

Discussion in 'Campfire Chat - General Discussions' started by Barrycdog, Oct 1, 2013.

  1. Barrycdog

    Barrycdog Captain

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    http://www.nbcnews.com/video/nbc-news/53103702

    Developers plan to turn former South Carolina slave cabins built in the 1850s into single-room rental homes while keeping the historic look. WYFF’s Mandy Gaither reports.
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  3. Seduzal

    Seduzal First Sergeant

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    Unable to open link? :help:

    Got the link oped this a.m. Great story about the Slave Cabins, but is going to take a lot of $$$ to turn them into single-room homes.
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2013
  4. Bonny Blue Flag

    Bonny Blue Flag 2nd Lieutenant

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    I got the link to open.

    Interesting story, thanks for sharing.

    --BBF
     
  5. JPK Huson 1863

    JPK Huson 1863 Captain Forum Host

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    Yes, not sure it's to preserve the unspeakable conditions, or the fact that humans kept other humans in what amounts to kennels- get this- from another web site, quoting the video

    "In South Carolina, a group of homes believed to be former slave cabins were condemned several years ago and scheduled for demolition.

    But one developer has new plans for the property.

    Chuck Corley intends to turn the old slave cabins into apartment complexes
    It’s such a part of our American history that…you have to recognize that.” said Corley. “We’re not gonna change the footprint or anything like that because we can’t do that on the outside. We want to save it in its purest form that it can save for subsequent generations to see what well-built cabins these were.”

    "An organization called the Palmetto Trust for Historic Preservation bought the homes in 2009, keeping them from being destroyed. The homes were built in the 1850s and are believed to be the last known slave cabins in .( sentence truncated, no idea why ) "

    Corley is under contract to buy the building and has already renovated other historic properties such as Lemmon Hill Plantation and Corley Hall Plantation. "

    Iew. " ..... how well-built some of these cabins are " , is he kidding, making money from the bondage of an entire race and this dark chapter of our history- while completely ignoring the reason those cabins existed? That kind of makes me bilious. So yea- just IEW. I feel slimed just having read the guy's quote. Is it just me? If anyone stays in one of these rentals, hope they get haunted.

    This is worse than the casino at Gettysburg.
     
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  6. K Hale

    K Hale Colonel Civil War Photo Contest
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    I think "how well built these cabins are" was intended as a compliment to the slaves who built them. I.e. they're still standing 160 years later.
     
  7. John Hartwell

    John Hartwell Sergeant Major

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    Admittedly, a rather distasteful idea.

    On the other hand, it is saving threatened historic buildings. Lacking someone with the interest, and very deep pockets, to preserve them in their context for educational purposes, this might be the only alternative to letting them simply rot away.

    I suppose it could be done tastefully (??) but I'm not holding my breath. I tremble at the thought of, "How lucky our 'beloved servants' were to have such nice, cozy little homes ... rent free!"

    jno
     
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  8. K Hale

    K Hale Colonel Civil War Photo Contest
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    Y'all make it sound like this is a new thing. When I visited Richmond, I stayed in the little cabins in the back of the Linden Tree Hotel that used to be slave quarters. Unlike these SC cabins, the historic look of the Linden Tree's had not been particularly preserved. The Linden Tree itself had been a home at the time. Stuart was friends with the owners and stayed there... that's what drew me...
     
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  9. James B White

    James B White 1st Lieutenant Trivia Game Winner

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    I was going to say something similar to what K Hale just posted. There are thousands of homes where slaves lived, already renovated and rented or sold to modern owners, with virtually no outrage. Plenty of southern mansions had slaves living in the kitchen to keep the fire ready for breakfast, or little rooms to be close by if the master or mistress needed something at night. We just tend to think of southern mansions as the homes of rich white people, and consider the others who lived there as an afterthought.

    As far as that goes, if this is supposed to be offensive, is it any different than renovating and selling a home that former slave-owners lived in? That's incredibly common in the south and few people get outraged the buildings are still standing and being used, or even that the owners are making money off what slave-owners accomplished by offering paid tours of the fancy architecture and furniture earned by slave labor.

    The only thing I dislike is the disingenous way of pointing out how well-built the cabins are, which could easily be interpreted as implying that all slaves (or typical slaves) lived in well-built homes, rather than the fact that some slaves lived in well-built homes. It's the constant problem of the public remembering the past mainly by the old things that survive. Of course the homes that last 150+ will be the well-built ones. By definition, the poorly-built substandard slave cabins have been abandoned and torn down. And of course the greater problem of slavery was not just the actual living conditions but the fact that enslaved people had no choice in those conditions.

    Do you mean the Linden Row Inn in Richmond? http://lindenrowinn.com/history I've stayed there a couple times when doing research in Richmond--very handy because they have a driver to take you around downtown. I've stayed in the renovated carriage house out back, but I don't recall any small slave-cabin type buildings though--everything seemed two-story, and the website only mentions two former carriage houses: http://lindenrowinn.com/accommodations (see "garden rooms"). Of course, it's likely that enslaved people did live upstairs of where the carriages were, but in that sense, most mansions in the south were the homes of slaves.
     
  10. CW3O

    CW3O Sergeant

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    Why renovate, rent them as is to the "re-enactment" crowd. Everyone who wants to experience and learn from "civil war " experience should "experience" it all. Maybe the staff could have overseers, a twelve hour (or more ) day of back breaking labor required.
     
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  11. RobertP

    RobertP Captain

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    Can see the ads. "I'm not a slave but I stayed in one of their cabins last night."
     
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  12. Eagle eye

    Eagle eye First Sergeant Trivia Game Winner

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    Don't you get it?
    Our slaves LOVE thier living on our plantations! They're a happy bunch! Listen to them sing in the fields pickin cotton!
    Still making the same absurd claim 150 some years later.
     
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  13. Barrycdog

    Barrycdog Captain

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    Sorry It does seem slow
     
  14. K Hale

    K Hale Colonel Civil War Photo Contest
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    That was it. I had the name wrong. The Pegrams were Stuart's friends. And I stayed in one of the garden rooms, but at that time, they were calling them the former "servants'" quarters, not the carriage house. Hmmmm.
     
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  15. RobertP

    RobertP Captain

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    I don't think anyone is saying that. I think someone is trying to make a buck. Why the outrage? Is this something new to you?
     
  16. Eagle eye

    Eagle eye First Sergeant Trivia Game Winner

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    Don't have any slave cabins up here where I live…saw some when I was stationed at Lajune in NC & sure didn't look "well made" to me. When I read the phrase about how well constructed theses cabins were it must have touched a nerve. I realize everyone is making a buck & I find it remarkable that speculators can market "well made" slave cabins & some people find them as a desirable place to live. Just over reacted I guess but still puzzles me.
     
  17. K Hale

    K Hale Colonel Civil War Photo Contest
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    That's all it seems like to me, too. I'm not feeling the pro-slavery subtext that others seem to be perceiving.
     
  18. K Hale

    K Hale Colonel Civil War Photo Contest
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    It surprises you that someone who was a slave could have been that skilled?
     
  19. Carronade

    Carronade Sergeant Major

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    There were thousands of slave owners, and they probably had different attitudes about slave quarters like people do about anything. Some spent as little as they could, others anticipated that their valuable slaves would need housing for the foreseeable future.

    I wonder how authentic these cabins will be by the time the owner installs modern plumbing, electricity, etc. and gets them up to code for residence or rental?
     
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  20. Eagle eye

    Eagle eye First Sergeant Trivia Game Winner

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    Not at all. Are you saying the majority of slaves lived in well constructed "cozy" homes? Talk about twisting things around…I challange you to live for a week in an original slave cabin & see if you're willing to invest in it. Of coarse you'll have to put in electricity & indoor plumbing once you put your $$$ down but I hope it's a good investment for you. Hope the roof doesn't leak.
     
  21. John Hartwell

    John Hartwell Sergeant Major

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    They make it pretty clear that it's the 'exterior' of the cabins they mean to preserve -- presumably as they are thought to have appeared when they were just built, "nice and shiny ... and well built'" (probably with lace curtains and a pretty little dooryard garden -- and, don't forget 'Massa's' welcome basket of fresh fruit and scented soaps.)

    Cheers!

    jno
     

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