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Famly lore rewritten because of good geneology work

Discussion in 'Researching Your Civil War Ancestry' started by Bonny Blue Flag, Jun 12, 2011.

  1. Bonny Blue Flag

    Bonny Blue Flag 2nd Lieutenant

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    Robert Orlando Smith is my g-g-grandfather on my mother's mother's side. Family lore was that he was wounded in the ankle at Pea Ridge, made his way home to Paris, Tx and died of blood poisoning via a dirty surgical instrument used to remove the minnie ball.

    A different version of family lore regarding Robert, he was recuperating at a field hospital from a battlefield wound. When he was able to leave the hospital, he discovered his unit had moved on, so Robert attached himself with a different unit to continued his military career.

    The records from his original unit showed him as being a deserter.

    Following is a statement written by Robert Orlando Smith after the war.

    "I enlisted in Judge H.S. Bennet's Company some time in the spring of 1861. The company was made up in and near Paris (Tx). We stayed near Paris until some time in the summer, when we went to southwest Missouri where we met General Ben McCullough and served as his escort until he was killed. We then retreated to Van Buren and on down the river to Des Arc in Iron Co. where we were dismounted and sent east of the Mississippi River, and served in M. D. Ectar's Brigade. I was wounded at Wartrace, Bedford Co. Tennessee and when I got able, I came west of the river, remounted myself, and served the balance of the war in Smith's Regiment, Shelby's Brigade."

    Can anyone shed some light on Robert's military career?

    Thanks,

    --BBF

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  3. Nathanb1

    Nathanb1 Brigadier General Moderator Forum Host

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    Bonny: I'm moving this to the Ancestors Forum where some of those good folks who like to do this hang out. :angel:
  4. Bonny Blue Flag

    Bonny Blue Flag 2nd Lieutenant

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    Thanks, Nate.

    --BBF
  5. Glorybound

    Glorybound Major Retired Moderator

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    Great thread Bonnie Blue, there's a good chance that somebody on the site might be able to answer some of your questions.

    Lee
  6. Union_Buff

    Union_Buff 1st Lieutenant Forum Host

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    I feel that Robert's statement after the war would possibly be the correct record, since it is first-hand, but that's just my opinion Bonny.
  7. Nathanb1

    Nathanb1 Brigadier General Moderator Forum Host

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    That record should be fairly easy to research by looking up the different units and their enlistment records. His claim of being in McCulloch's escort, for example. What have you done so far and where have you looked?
  8. 5fish

    5fish 2nd Lieutenant

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  9. 5fish

    5fish 2nd Lieutenant

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    Here is a short bio on Judge H. S. Bennet...

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hendley_S._Bennett

    More Bio...

    Hendly S. Bennett (First_Last)
    Regiment Name 32 Texas Cavalry
    Side Confederate
    Company G
    Soldier's Rank_In Captain
    Soldier's Rank_Out Captain
    Alternate Name
    Notes
    Film Number M227 roll 3

    Bio on the regiment.....

    32nd Regiment, Texas Cavalry (Crump's Battalion, Mounted Volunteers)
    32nd Cavalry Regiment [also called 15th Regiment] was organized in May, 1862, using the 1st Texas Cavalry Battalion as its nucleus. Many of it members were from Bowie, Marion, and Cass counties. The unit was soon dismounted and ordered east of the Mississippi River. After taking part in the Battle of Richmond, it was assigned to Ector's Brigade, Army of Tennessee. It participated in the campaigns of the army from Murfreesboro to Nashville, then aided in the defense of Mobile. This regiment lost fourteen percent of the 313 engaged at Murfreesboro and reported 2 casualties at New Hope Church, 12 at Latimar House, 15 at Smyrna, and 10 at Atlanta. Few surrendered on May 4, 1865. Its commanders were Colone Julius A. Andrews, Lieutenant Colonel James A. Weaver, and Major William E. Estes.

    Here is a bio on a man named Littlejohn who served in Judge Bennet's company so it will give you a little history up until General McCullough death...+

    WILLIAM N. LITTLEJOHN, son of Charles P. Littlejohn and Lettie Smith Littlejohn, born in South Carolina, December 22, 1845; removed with his parents from South Carolina to Texas in his youth. Enlisted in Captain H. S. Bennett’s Company, C. S. A., in 1862 at the age of 16 years, at Paris, Texas, but sworn into service on February 26, 1862. at Camp Strickler, Arkansas. This company was the escort of General Ben McCullough until he was killed at Elkhorn Tavern. It then became a part of the 15th Texas Cavalry known as Company "G." On July 8, 1862, his enlistment expired and on July 12 he again re-enlisted in Company "G," 29th Texas Cavalry. At that time the regiment had only nine companies, its Colonel being Charles DeMorse. In 1863 he was transferred to Company "K," 29th Texas Cavalry, General Gano’s brigade. In spring of 1865 the regiment being dismounted it was placed in General Walker’s Texas Division of infantry, where he served until the last of May or first of June, 1865, when the command was disbanded by general order at Hempstead, Texas, never having surrendered. After close of the Civil War he removed to Evansville, Washington County, Arkansas, and after a short time to Flint District, Cherokee Nation. He was married twice, first to Emily Adair and second to Kate Miller, both members by blood of the Cherokee Tribe.

    This should shed some light up until he was wounded....
  10. 5fish

    5fish 2nd Lieutenant

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    Here find Robert Smith....


    Robert O. Smith (First_Last)
    Regiment Name 32 Texas Cavalry
    Side Confederate
    Company G
    Soldier's Rank_In Private
    Soldier's Rank_Out Private
    Alternate Name
    Notes
    Film Number M227 roll 34
  11. Nathanb1

    Nathanb1 Brigadier General Moderator Forum Host

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  12. Nathanb1

    Nathanb1 Brigadier General Moderator Forum Host

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  13. 5fish

    5fish 2nd Lieutenant

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    Smith regiment in Shelby's brigade seems to Col. Moses Smith of the 11th Missouri Cavalry regiment..

    http://www.mogenweb.org/mocivwar/confederates.html


    http://www.fortunecity.com/victorian/pottery/1080/osage_bridge_mo_6oct64.htm


    The Missouri 11th Cavalry regiment lived a confused life....

    http://www.missouridivision-scv.org/mounits/11mocav.htm

    In winter of 1863-64 the 6th cavalry regiment took on new men and became the 11th...Here is where Robert Orlando Smith most likely enters the story...

    6th Regiment, Missouri Cavalry
    6th Cavalry Regiment [also called Southwest Cavalry] was formed during the late spring of 1862. Many of its members were form the counties of Barry, Newton, McDonald, Jasper, and Lawrence. The unit skirmished in the Indian Territory and Missouri, then was assigned to General Shelby's Brigade, Trans-Mississippi Department. It went on to take part in Shelby's raid in Arkansas and Missouri, Marmaduke's Expedition into Missouri, and again saw action in Arkansas. The unit reported 30 casualties with Marmaduke and 19 at Helena. During the winter of 1863-1864 new men joined the command, and it was redesignated the 11th Missouri Cavalry. The field officers were Colonel John T. Coffee and G.W. Thompson, Lieutenant Colonel James C. Hooper, and Majors George W. Nichols amd Moses W. Smith.
  14. Bonny Blue Flag

    Bonny Blue Flag 2nd Lieutenant

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    Wow! Thanks all for your help.

    My mother's cousin is the family geneologist. I'll make sure this info is passed on.

    Thanks again.

    --BBF
  15. khalleron

    khalleron Corporal

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    From Jan-April 1863, he's listed sick in hospital at Cleveland, TN.

    On Dec 19, 1863, he appears on a list of deserters who turned themselves in under the amnesty proclamation and are now in camp at Bonham (no state listed).

    He enlisted 8/5/1861 at Paris, TX by Capt. Bennett for a 12 month term, apparently extended under the Conscription Act.

    His horse was valued at $150.00.

    This all from his military record at Footnote.com. No mention of him changing regiments.

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