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Civilians killed during Morgan's Raid

Discussion in 'Civil War History - General Discussion' started by Civilwarcrow, Sep 2, 2013.

  1. Civilwarcrow

    Civilwarcrow Banned

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    Civilians Killed during Morgan's Raid according to the book,The Lonest Raid,by L.V. Horwitz, pg387

    1.Nathan McKinzie at Mauckport Harrison Co.IN
    2.James Currant at Brandenburg Crossing,Harrison Co. IN
    3.Rev.Peter Glenn,Lutheran minister,Corydon,Harrison Co.IN
    4.William Heath,tollgate keeper,Corydon,Harrison Co. IN
    5.Jacob Ferree County Commissioner,Corydon,Harrison Co.IN
    6.Georia (Jeremiah) Nantz,Corydon,Harrison Co.IN
    7.Harrison Steepleton,Corydon.Harrison Co.IN
    8.Isaac Lang,Corydon Harrison Co.IN
    9.Mrs Cynthia B.Denbo,Corydon,Harrison Co. IN died of heat exhaustion carrying water for raiders.
    10.Miss Abie Siemmons,Corydon,Harrison Co.IN died of typhoid contracted after an exhausting two days of carrying water for both Confederate and Union troops

    To be continued
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2013

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  3. Civilwarcrow

    Civilwarcrow Banned

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    I'm going to have to admit so far most of these were citizen solders killed in fighting or a result of,but theres more listed..
     
  4. NFB22

    NFB22 First Sergeant

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    If I remember correctly one man was shot because he failed to comply with the raiders commands, turned out he was deaf and therefore could not hear them.
     
  5. Civilwarcrow

    Civilwarcrow Banned

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    Continued;
    11.James Wright,fifteen-year old ,while trying to hide family horse
    12.John Wible,Washington Co.IN
    13.William Vance,Washington Co.IN
    14.Rev.Horsley,Methodist preacher in Pierceville Ripley Co.IN shot because he was deaf and didn't hear the command to halt.
    15.John Sawdon,Dearborn Co.IN
    16.James McDougal,a teacher in Jaser,Pike Co.OH
    17.Harry Kelly,assistant manager of the Logan Furnace in Morgan Co. OH
    18.Dr.William N. Hudson,a physician south of Rutland in Megis Co. OH
    19.Halliday Hysell,a eldery citizen Meigs Co. OH
    20.Cornelius Conway,a fireman aboard the Little Miami Railroad near Loveland in Clermont Co.OH
    21.Harvey "Doc" Burris near Jackson in Jackson Co. OH
    22.Henry Meyer (Myer) at Miamisburg bridge in Hamilton Co.OH
    23.William Johnston an elderly citizen of Eckmanville,OH who was mistaken for someone else who had taken a shot at the confederates.
     
  6. ErnieMac

    ErnieMac 2nd Lieutenant Forum Host Trivia Game Winner

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    From the Kintner House Inn website: http://www.kintnerhouse.com/battleofcorydonroom.htm

    One mile south of Corydon on old Highway 135 is the site of the Civil War's "Battle of Corydon." The Skirmish occurred July 9, 1863 and was the only major battle fought during General John Hunt Morgan's raid throughout southern Indiana and Ohio. It is one of two battles ever fought north of the Mason-Dixon Line, the other being the Battle of Gettysburg. Six brave members of the Harrison County "Home Guards" lost their lives during the historic event. The battle also cost the Confederate army at least six of their soldiers.
    HOME GUARD CASUALTIES:
    Lt. James Currant
    Georgia Jeremiah Nance
    Nathan McKinzie
    Harrison Steepleton
    Col. Jacob Ferree
    Isaac Lang

    William Heth: Tollgate keeper who was killed at his tollgate on the edge of Corydon.
    Reverend Peter Glenn: Lutheran Minister. The first shots were exchanged on his farm. A Confederate soldier was killed by Glenn's son, and in retaliation the Glenn house was set afire. The Reverend was shot and killed and his son wounded.

    CONFEDERATE CASUALTIES:
    Pvt. Arthur Johnson
    Pvt. Len A. Sharp
    Capt. W.H. Wilson
    Lt. P.H. Thorpe
    Pvt. Greene Bottomer: Age seventeen, Bottomer was the only Confederate soldier with a marked grave at Corydon. A Confederate flag flies over his grave at Cedar Hill Cemetery. The grave is just inside and east of the main gate. The headstone bears the inscription:
    GREENE BOTTOMER
    A member of Gen. John H. Morgan's Command
    Killed July 9, 1863

    The stone was erected by Col. Bennett Young -- president of Monon Railroad.
     
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  7. Civilwarcrow

    Civilwarcrow Banned

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    "Despite this, a crew of axemen laid a huge barricade of timber across the road to Jasper. It took Morgan six hours to get past this defended obstacle. He made prisoners of the culprits who had caused this delay, and marched them on the double quick to Jasper in Pike County.
    Among the prisoners was a young school teacher named Joseph McDougal who had seriously offended Captain Mitchell of Morgan's staff. The prisoners were lined up and paroled, excepting for McDougal. He was set adrift in a canoe in the Scioto river nearby, then promptly shot by rebel marksmen. The canoe drifted along down the river, with the bloody corpse of McDougal as a warning to those who planned to resist the raiders."

    http://www.piketoninfo.com/page.php?ID=6183
     
  8. ErnieMac

    ErnieMac 2nd Lieutenant Forum Host Trivia Game Winner

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    Account of Morgan's Raid through Salem, Indiana from The Centennial History of Washington County, Indiana. I cleaned up text errors as best I could determine.

    GENERAL MORGAN'S RAID.
    Relying on numerous reports received concerning public sentiment in southern Indiana, as well as information that large bodies of men were organized and ready to do battle for the South as soon as an opportunity presented itself, General Morgan planned a raid across the Ohio and up into the state as far as practical, recruiting his forces as he went along. The
    Ohio was crossed at Brandenburg, on July 8, 1863, his force consisting of some 4,000 men. They carried along with them three rifled twenty-four pound parrots and two twelve-pound howitzers. At Corydon there was quite a skirmish in which two of Morgan's men were killed, and some twenty wounded, who were left behind. They failed to find any sympathizers
    armed and ready to join their cause, but concluded to press on and do as much damage as possible.
    Salem was reached on July 10. No one knew what route General Morgan would take and there was no concentration of Home Guards at Salem in sufificient number to offer resistance. A few companies had gathered on the public square, but Morgan's forces were on the hills south of town so suddenly and unexpectedly that the militia skedaddled in short order
    without firing a shot.
    Captain Jones, of Morgan's vanguard marched down to the top of the rise just south of the creek, where he displayed a flag of truce, and came to a halt. In a short time a delegation of citizens marched down, also under a white flag. The surrender of the town was demanded, and inquiry was made as to whether or not resistance was intended, finding the way clear, the rebels moved on, promising to respect prixale property except such as was needed for food, clothing and mounts. They immediately took complete possession of the town, placing guards over stores and streets.

    THE RAIDERS IN SALEM.
    General Morgan made his headquarters at the Persise House, on the southeast corner of the square. The raiders entered the town at nine o'clock in the morning and left at three o'clock in the afternoon, going east through Canton and New Philadelphia. Several parties who refused to obey the commands of guards when ordered to halt were shot at. John H. Wible, of Livonia, was killed and Henry Hoar and Joshua Bottorff were wounded. Mr. Hoar died from the effects of the wound several years afterward. Others were shot at, but managed to escape injury. Jacob Hattabough, a cripple, and eighty-three years old, was hobbling down Main street when he was halted by a sentinel and asked if he was an abolitionist or a Democrat. "I am a Democrat," replied the old man. The rebel then ordered him to hurrah for Jeff Davis, to which demand the old man bluntly refused. He was then commanded to move on or "he'd have a bullet hole put through his carcass." This the old man refused to do till he got ready, saying: "You don't know who you're talking to. Shoot, d — n you. Kill me if you want to, for you can't cheat me out of many days, anyway, you dirty scoundrel." The rebel
    moved on saying to a companion, "that old chap is the grittiest and contrariest old fellow I ever saw." Hattabough then went to the hotel, introduced himself to General Morgan, passed a few jokes with him, and told him if he ever got back south alive he might consider himself a very lucky individual.
    While in Salem the raider burned the large brick depot and all the cars on the tracks and the railroad bridges on each side of town. They taxed the two flour-mills, owned by DePauw and Knight, $1,ooo each, and levied the same amount on Allen's woolen factory. They looted the grocery and clothing stores, and appropriated many things from ail the merchants in town. Total loss sustained was estimated at about $15,000. While on the march they spread out over the country quite a distance. Some of them got as far east as Pekin, when they encountered a company of Home Guards, and in the skirmish 1 rebel was killed and 5 wounded and 19 captured.

    OBTAINING FRESH HORSES.
    Morgan's men were always on the go, and had been riding most of the time day and night, and this had caused many of their horses to have sore backs and to be out of condition in many ways. Every good horse they could find was picked up and one of the jaded, worn-out critters was left in its place, while they sang, "We'll ride them till their hacks are sore, then turn them out and steal some more." Probalily 500 horses were thus appropriated by Morgan's men as they passed through the county. Many of those who lost horses at the hands of the inxaders picked up the sore-backed horses and
    thought they would keep them in place of the ones they had lost; but the government sent men around and picked up all horses that Morgan's men had left behind, and a sale was held in Salem at which they were all disposed of. Many farmers who learned that Morgan was coming took the precaution to hustle their horses back into the hills, or secreted them in out-of-the-way thickets where they were kept till General Hobson's Union forces put in an appearance the following day
    There were no residences burned as the enemy passed through the County the greatest hardship endured being put upon the women folks who were required to cook for the hungry marauders until their larders were exhausted. The scene changed on the 11h when Hobson's men came into the town on forced march, hoping to soon overtake the rebels. They were greeted by squads of young ladies on the street corners, who sang patriotic songs, and scores of elderly matrons who carried baskets of cooked food for the hungry soldiers, which they handed out without price.
    The many amusing incidents that were related concerning this raid for years after would fill a good-sized volume. Very few persons suffered any severe loss, outside of merchants.
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2013
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  9. wilber6150

    wilber6150 Brigadier General Moderator

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    Great thread on a raid we hear little about...
     
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  10. Civilwarcrow

    Civilwarcrow Banned

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    It took place right in my back yard,like Sherman's March for southerners..
    My parents told me some crazy stories growing up,mom said we had no family records on my dad's side because Morgan burned down the court house,well that didn't happen at least in Ohio and there are plenty of family records,we had brick paved streets in town,my dad said they were layed by rebels prisoners taken during Morgan's Raid,nope,by a work gang of Indians in the 1920's .One does need to sort out fact from fiction,Morgan or Sherman. Seem I have been correct somewhat,while many of the civilian killed were called out to resist Morgan,seems some were not,they were just civilians.
     
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  11. ErnieMac

    ErnieMac 2nd Lieutenant Forum Host Trivia Game Winner

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    From the 'Illustrated historical and business review of Meigs and Gallia counties, Ohio', originally published in 1891.
    http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ohmeigs/civil_war/morgan.html

    But these outrages only proved Morgan to be the leader of a band of thieves, robbers and incendiaries. To the disgrace of human nature, and as if to place the gang in its true light before the world, they committed numerous coldblooded murders, and attempted to commit many more by shooting at unarmed and peaceable citizens, many of whom escaped as if by miracle, having their clothes perforated by the balls of their murderous weapons. We give a few instances which occurred in our immediate neighborhood.
    Holiday Hysell, an old man, seventy years of age, living four miles from town, "hazzahed!" for the Union. For this they shot him dead!
    Dr. Hudson, known to all our citizens, also over seventy years of age, universally repected by all who knew him, lived neighbor to Hysell and started to go to him, when the dastardly murderers shot him, inflicting a mortal wound, from which he died the next day. In the murder of Hysell, they had the "traitor's plea" that a word spoken for the "Union" maddened them in their mission for its destruction. But for the murder of Dr. Hudson, they had not even that pretense of an excuse. He was simply on a mission of mercy; he taunted them with no word of patriotism or otherwise; his murder was simply cold-blooded, ferocious, brutal, devilish!
    At Rock Spring, they captured Isaac Carleton Jr., son of Carleton of Syracuse, and another young man whose name we do not know. After robbing them and keeping them some time they released them and ordered them to run on "double quick." They did so, and when at some distance the demons fired on them as hunters would upon wolves. Carleton was shot in the back, the ball passing through his body; and out of the right breast, and left for dead. His companion escaped with some holes in his clothes.
     
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  12. Rebforever

    Rebforever 2nd Lieutenant

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    Yep! War was hell!
     
  13. Civilwarcrow

    Civilwarcrow Banned

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    Still is,so I'm told...
     
  14. ErnieMac

    ErnieMac 2nd Lieutenant Forum Host Trivia Game Winner

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    Reaction to the raid near Cincinnati from Butler County Civil War 150.
    https://sites.google.com/site/butle...y/cyclopaedia/morgans-raid-in-butler-county-1

    "MORGAN's original object was, doubtless, to scour Indiana and Ohio, capturing horses, carriages, etc., destroying railroad bridges, mills,and in all respects to eclipse the Grierson raid. By the vigorous action of the Indiana and Ohio home guards, and the United States troops sent in pursuit, this intention was changed to that of getting across the Ohio as rapidly as possible with his tired out men and their plunder. The rapidity of his march since Sunday, his evident determination to avoid battle, his neglecting to destroy the Cincinnati, Hamilton, and Dayton, and the Little Miami Railroads, or other bridges or tracks except in his direct route, prove this conclusively. The river was patrolled by armed boats, and HOBSON's troops were close upon his rear. The militia were rising in his front; if turned back his exhausted men and horses must of necessity have fallen an easy prey to the troops in pursuit. If he reached and attempted to cross the swollen Ohio, he would have done so at the loss of his artillery and with the loss of many, if not all, of his men."
     
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  15. Civilwarcrow

    Civilwarcrow Banned

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    "The next invasion of Indiana occurred in June of the fol-
    lowing year. General John H. Morgan's men, collectively
    and in detached bands, had become famous for partisan war-
    fare in Kentucky and Tennessee, raiding towns, holding up
    and robbing trains, destroying railroad property, and com-
    mitting deeds of violence amounting to plain highway rob-
    bery, except so far as they were excused by a state of war.
    Captain Thomas Hines, of the Ninth Kentucky Cavalry, was
    one of the celebrated guerrilla leaders in Morgan's band.
    Early in June, 1863, he obtained permission from General
    Morgan to take such of his men as were best mounted, and
    scout north of the Cumberland river. 3

    2 Smith's History of Indiana, pages 360, 361.
    Adjt. Gen. Terrell's Report. Vol. 1, page 146.
    s Morgan's Cavalry, pag*J 430.



    136 Morgan's Raid in Indiana

    On June 13th, 1863, he advanced with 120 men to Eliza-
    bethtown, Kentucky, forty miles southwest of Louisville,
    where he plundered the citizens, and broke open the safe of
    the Adams Express Company, and stole the contents. He
    then stopped a south bound freight train loaded with horses,
    and after taking 120 of the horses set fire to the train and
    fled. His company was pursued by Federal troops, and part
    of them were captured, with some of the stolen horses. 4

    Finding Kentucky too warm for him, he resolved to cross
    over into Indiana and "stir up the copperheads," as General
    Basil Duke expressed it. 5

    Two days after the raid on Elizabethtown, sixty-four of
    these men 6 reached the Ohio river, forty miles northwest of
    Elizabethtown, and about half way between Louisville and
    Evansville, which were the nearest points on the river reached
    by railroads and telegraph lines. At five o'clock on Thurs-
    day morning, June 18, they crossed on 7 wood boats into
    Perry county, Indiana, at Flint Island, between Rome and
    Cannelton, 8 swimming their horses twenty or thirty yards
    across the only part of the shallow channel which the horses
    could not wade. 9 They were not in uniform, but were
    dressed in ordinary clothes, each man carrying two revolvers,

    4 Louisville Journal, June 15, 1863.

    New Albany Daily Ledger, June 14, 1863.

    s Morgan's Cavalry, page 431.

    Madison Courier, June 25, 1863.

    New Albany Daily Ledger, June 22, 1863.

    6 New Albany Daily Ledger, June 22, 1863.
    Indianapolis Journal, June 23, 1863.

    7 New Albany Daily Ledger, June 22, 1863.
    s Indianapolis Journal, June 23, 1863.
    Madison Courier, June 24, 1863.
    Smith's History of Indiana, page 373.

    9 New Albany Daily Ledger, June 19, 1863.



    Morgan's Raid in Indiana 137

    while they also carried a medley of muskets, rifles and shot-
    guns. 10

    They rode north through Perry county into Orange coun-
    ty, and as they went they made frequent stops to exchange
    their jaded horses for fresh ones, pretending that they were
    Union troops looking for deserters, and giving pretended
    orders on the United States quartermaster at Indianapolis in
    payment of any agreed difference in price. 11 . They even
    went so far as to arrest two deserters who were pointed out
    to them, and compelled the prisoners to accompany them for
    several miles. 12 They arrived near Orleans, in Orange
    county, fifty miles north, at six o'clock that evening. 13 But
    having become an object of suspicion and finding that the
    militia were gathering to oppose them, they forcibly seized
    the horses of a party of fourteen militiamen. Then, turn-
    ing east to the Washington county line, and meeting a man
    who refused to give up his horse, they knocked him to the
    ground, and when he got up and ran they shot him in the
    back, and killed him,"
    http://www02.us.archive.org/stream/morgansraidinind72ewba/morgansraidinind72ewba_djvu.txt
     
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  16. Civilwarcrow

    Civilwarcrow Banned

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    Number 24;
    The Morgan raiders killed an inoffensive citizen near Jackson Ohio, one Harvey Hamilton Burris, familiarly known as "Doc. Burris."
    http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ohjackso/mho-main-page.htm
     
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  17. ErnieMac

    ErnieMac 2nd Lieutenant Forum Host Trivia Game Winner

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    Excerpt from the Claremont County Historic Society
    http://clermont-county-history.org/historical-articles/morgans-raid-trail.html

    Morgan's Raid Trail in Clermont County Ohio by Richard Crawford - 2000

    Go north on S. R. 126 until you arrive at Beech Road (1.1). Turn onto Beech Road. At its crossing of the Little Miami Scenic Bike Trail (0.6) there is a Clermont County Bicentennial Marker. One-half mile north on the trail is a section once known as the dangerous curve. Here, the Raiders placed cross-ties wedged upright in a cattle guard causing a train to derail. They hid in a cornfield about one-half mile north of the obstruction. On the train were about 150-300 unarmed recruits bound for Camp Dennison. None were seriously hurt. Engineer John Redman was seriously injured and one man was killed, fireman Cornelius Conway. Stories are still being told and sightings made of the ghost of Conway and carrying his lantern in this area.
     
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  18. Civilwarcrow

    Civilwarcrow Banned

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    Number 20,thanks..
     
  19. theoldman

    theoldman Sergeant Trivia Game Winner

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    Yep! War was hell!

    Was Morgan operating under the orders from any CSA chain of command?
     
  20. Mark F. Jenkins

    Mark F. Jenkins Major Forum Host

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    My great-great-great-uncle, Lorenzo "Ren" Dow Headley was killed during the operations connected with Morgan's Raid, but I recall that he was in the militia, so he wouldn't have qualified as a civilian casualty.

    The family story (I've mentioned this elsewhere) is that Morgan personally shot Ren "because Ren wouldn't surrender," which I find extremely far-fetched. Far more likely it was a simple firefight with a patrol or something.
     
  21. Civilwarcrow

    Civilwarcrow Banned

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    From what I have read,not in crossing the Ohio river,that seems to have been against orders.
     

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