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Black Confederates

Discussion in 'Civil War History - General Discussion' started by JWheeler331, Jun 6, 2012.

  1. JWheeler331

    JWheeler331 First Sergeant

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    Upon reading the other thread about the black Confederate I knew I had some info on him so looking through my files I found some more pictures of Black Confederates. I thought I would share them here as to not take away from the other thread. Some are identified and some are not.


    Holt Collier

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    At the outbreak of the Civil War, Howell Hinds joined the Confederate Army and gave Collier his freedom papers. Collier immediately tried to join the Confederate forces alongside Hinds, but was told he was too young to fight. He ran away from the plantation and stowed away on a riverboat in the Mississippi for almost a year and then joined the 9th Texas Brigade by his own choice and served throughout the war. He finished his service as one of Nathan Bedford Forrest’s most trusted cavalry scouts, known as a superb horseman and marksman.

    During the time of Reconstruction, Collier was accused of murdering a Yankee soldier, Captain James King, but was acquitted by a military tribunal in Vicksburg. King and Howell Hinds were involved in a fight and during the dispute, Hinds, though a much older man, knocked the youngster down several times. King’s anger grew with every knockdown. Finally, the thoroughly infuriated young man drew a knife on his unarmed opponent, but a bystander fired shots killing King, preventing him from drawing blood with his knife. It was never fully proven that Holt Collier was the man behind the gun. Soon after the trial, Collier left Mississippi and headed for Texas to lay low and let the controversy of the trial and King’s death blow over.

    While in Texas, Collier used his skills as a horseman to work as a cowboy for one of the Lone Star State’s Founding Fathers, Lawrence Sullivan Ross, on Ross’ large ranch. Ross was one of the first Texas Rangers and eventually Governor of Texas, which adds a bit of irony to the story considering Collier was biding time waiting for a murder accusation to pass.



    Unidentified Black Confederate

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    Unidentified Black Confederate

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    Unidentified Black Confederate

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    Jeff Shields, a cook for the Stonewall Jackson Brigade, maybe a cook for Stonewall Jackson himself.

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    John Noland

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    This image was taken by E.A. Baldwin June 5 1863. This is John Noland. Gus Myers spoke highly of this black man in notes in his journal. He is wearing a Confederate raider hat. He was Quantrill’s personal scout and spy. He later attended many of the Quantrill Reunions and was very highly respected. All of his pall bearers were former Quantrill guerrillas, white men who loved him.

    Unidentified Black Confederate

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    Half Brothers

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    This ambrotype taken by Washburn & Co. of New Orleans captured an example of a unique social status in antebellum New Orleans. These Confederate soldiers are half brothers, the one on the right a mulatto.


    Silas Chandler

    Most of us have seen this photo before.

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    The one-of-a-kind Civil War photograph is at the center of a hot debate over whether black men fought for the Confederate army. Was Silas Chandler, the black man in a Confederate uniform, slave or free? What was the relationship between him and Andrew Chandler, the man at left?

    The gentleman on the right is Silas Chandler, his slave, or as we've always called him, manservant. Andrew Chandler fought with the 44th Mississippi Cavalry, as did Silas. They're about the same age, joined the Confederate army when Andrew was 16, Silas was 17, and they fought in four battles together. What I'm told is unusual about this is that both men are obviously in Confederate uniforms and that images of African Americans in Confederate uniforms during the war are particularly rare. I think they were seen more prevalently at veterans reunions and things wearing Confederate uniforms. But it was, I think, a very interesting relationship. The men grew up together, they worked the fields together, and continued to live closely throughout the rest of their lives.


    Daniel Jenkins

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    Mulatto Confederate Soldier Daniel Jenkins and his wife. Jenkins was with the Confederate 9th Kentucky Infantry and was killed at Shiloh on 4/6/62.
     

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  3. JWheeler331

    JWheeler331 First Sergeant

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    Anthony T. Welters

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    Confederate soldier Anthony T. Welters is pictured in this late 1800's portrait. Welters is one of two African American Confederate soldiers buried at San Lorenzo Cemetery in St. Augustine.

    Returning to St. Augustine, after the war, Welters lived at 79 Bridge St. and became active in politics and with the E. Kirby Smith Camp, United Confederate Veterans. He died in 1902 at 92 years old.



    Wary Clyburn

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    Wary Clyburn, served with honour
    Mattie Clyburn Rice is the second black "Real Daughter" to be recognized by the United Daughters of the Confederacy.

    Mattie Clyburn Rice, 88, spent years searching through archives to prove her father was a black Confederate. As she leafs through a notebook filled with official-looking papers, Rice stops to read a faded photocopy with details of her father's military service.


    "At Hilton Head while under fire of the enemy, he carried his master out of the field of fire on his shoulder, that he performed personal service for Robert E. Lee. That was his pension record," Rice says.

    http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/f...=all&GSdyrel=all&GSob=n&GRid=60770561&df=all&


    Burrel Hemphill

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  4. donna

    donna Colonel Forum Host

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    Very interesting post. Like all the photos.
     
  5. donna

    donna Colonel Forum Host

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    As member of UDC, we send cards to Mattie Clyburn Rice. I am on the Committee Chairman for my Chapter of the UDC that honors all real daughters. Her father's story is very interesting.
     
  6. Linda Duff

    Linda Duff Corporal

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    Perhaps it's not so stange as I originally thought. After looking at these pictures I'm reminded that many Irish fought for the British during WWI and WWII...the very people who oppressed them...does make you wonder that sometimes people are more important than the politics and in other realities the politics are more important than the people.
     
  7. JWheeler331

    JWheeler331 First Sergeant

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    I think that like the whites.....the North was invading the where the blacks lived also. Not all slaves were mistreated. Not all blacks were slaves.
     
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  8. Rob9641

    Rob9641 Captain Civil War Photo Contest
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    Good photos, but I wonder why the fellow in front of the Confederate flag is holding a U.S. canteen. Since we don't know who he is, I guess we'll never know why.
     
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  9. matthew mckeon

    matthew mckeon Brigadier General Moderator

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    Its good these black men can perform a vital service for us today: making whitey feel better about slavery.

    While I don't plan to crawl through the sewer of the black confederate soldier myth again, I will note that the sweet little story about about Andrew Chandler and his slave Silas, and their long and loving friendship has been throughly debunked on this forum. But like a persistent rash, it bursts out again.
     
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  10. jgoodguy

    jgoodguy Brigadier General Moderator Forum Host

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    Key questions.

    Where are all the Black SCV and UDC members, memorials to Black Confederates erected by the same and pictures of Blacks attending Confederate veteran events?
     
  11. GAvolunteer

    GAvolunteer Corporal

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    Besides the fact that confederates used alot of yankee gear the canteen could have been a photographers prop.
    The photorapher could have ment it to be symbolic: an old confederate soldier looking up on the Yankee army
     
  12. James B White

    James B White 1st Lieutenant Trivia Game Winner

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    [​IMG]

    That's Jeff Shields, a cook for the Stonewall Jackson Brigade, maybe a cook for Stonewall Jackson himself.
     
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  13. matthew mckeon

    matthew mckeon Brigadier General Moderator

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    That's the point, isn't it? Trying to pretend the slaves and servants with the Confederate army were soldiers. So you can pretend the Civil War wasn't an attempt to maintain slavery.
     
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  14. Linda Duff

    Linda Duff Corporal

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    Are we as members allowed to censure moderators for inflammatory remarks...respectfully asked and respectfully surprised.
     
  15. Rob9641

    Rob9641 Captain Civil War Photo Contest
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    Maybe - or it's all just props. We apparently have no way of knowing. For some of these photos we have the background information, for some we don't - for the guy with the canteen, we don't, so we really don't know the circumstances behind the photo.
     
  16. CSA Today

    CSA Today Major

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  17. shanniereb

    shanniereb Sergeant Major

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    I have done some research on this area, I really like the photos they are very nice.
     
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  18. shanniereb

    shanniereb Sergeant Major

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  19. coltshooter1

    coltshooter1 Sergeant

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    Do you always have to be the smart mouth moderator. I thought to moderate meant to conduct yourself in a dignified manner and to prevent problems, not create problems with a poor attitude.
     
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  20. Delhi Rangers

    Delhi Rangers First Sergeant

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    JWheeler331...Here is some free/good advice from a fellow Son of the South. Keep your head down for you will be receiving many missiles and headshots coming toward you. Duck and Good Luck!
     
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  21. unionblue

    unionblue Brev. Brig. Gen'l

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    Sorry, but matthew has it right, no matter how roughly he has stated it.

    Far too often, the research on this area is sketchy at best, and at most time pure myth. I would like to see any source documentation that proves any of the above shown were confederate soldiers or that their stories of sacrifice can be at least verified with historical documentation.

    Far too often, this myth is repeated for the sole purpose of deflecting the reason for Southern secession and the cause of the American Civil War, the institution of slavery.

    Sincerely,
    Unionblue
     
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