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Always go back and reread....

Discussion in 'Researching Your Civil War Ancestry' started by Nathanb1, Mar 2, 2013.

  1. Nathanb1

    Nathanb1 Brigadier General Moderator Forum Host

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    I've been re-reading the Sanders family history. This is my maternal grandmother's side of the family, which first came to the US in the 1600's in North Carolina, then traveled down to Georgia, participated in the land lottery, then on to Mississippi. One of their ancestors was Amos Horton, a captain under Francis Marion, so they obviously had some SC ties at some point.

    My g-great grandfather, Willis Perry Sanders, was a farmer...but in rereading I've picked up that he was also a gunsmith by trade. Well, this explains why so many of his sons enlisted....I suspect they were good shots and well-armed...and BTW, his brother in law, Zachariah Booth, was the captain of the Leake Co. Company (The Scotland Guards) they tended to enlist in. Makes sense to me. It also explains why one of his sons, Lt. John Henry Sanders, and a cousin, Alsey Andrew Sanders, died "a-tinckering with a mine" at Ft. Pemberton in April, 1863. They had recently been a part of the sinking of Star of the West, and were probably doing a little recycling and repair. Hey, if you can take a gun apart, you can take a mine apart....right? Don't answer that.

    This is a quote from another cousin in Georgia, Mitchell E. McLaughlin, who did the basic research on the family....

    "Eleven of our Sanders relatives were known to have served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War and only four survived. Four of my great-great-grandfather Willis Sanders' sons served (that's my g-g-grandfather as well). Willis' brother, Bluford Sanders, had one son who served but did not survive. Willis' brother Micajah and one son served and both survived."

    Andrew Jackson Sanders died in quarters Jan. 14, 1864 near Dalton, GA., age 22. He was unmarried.
    John Henry Sanders blew himself up April 19, 1863 at Ft. Pemberton, Age 23, leaving a widow, Mary.
    Micajah Pope Sanders was wounded at Peachtree Creek and survived. He lost several fingers and lived to the age of 79. He walked home from North Carolina after surrendering at Greensboro.
    Alsey H. Sanders died in camp in October 1862, which is probably illness or accident. His father did file a claim for his pay at time of death, so it was military-related.
    Francis Marion Sanders survived and died in 1921.
    George Washington Sanders was sick and on furlough several times during the war. In 1864 he recovered and returned to his unit in time to be captured at the Osage Orange Hedge in Franklin, was sent to Camp Douglas, and died there of pleurisy on March 28, 1865.
    John Perry Sanders mustered in at 19, was sick constantly, and finally mustered out and died at home in July 1862. Again, the cause must have been related to Military service, because his father filed and received a claim for his death.
    Alsey Andrew Sanders blew himself up with his cousin, John Henry in April, 1863.
    David W. Sanders was in Co. E, 17th Ala., was captured and died at Camp Douglas Sept. 26, 1864, probably of dysentery.
    Micajah (Mike) Sanders was in Co. B, 40th Miss., enlisting at the age of 43. He served from October 1863 to April 26, 1865, when he was paroled near Greensboro. At the end he was with Co. I of the 3rd Miss. Consolidated Rgt.
    Burton Sanders, his son, served with his father at the same times and places. He died in 1904
    Another son, Thomas, may or may not have been in the service (I'll have to look him up)....but died June 1862, which makes it a possibility.

    As you can see, I have a lot left to do. The research Mr. McLaughlin did was pre-Internet age, so I want to see what else has turned up since then. :smile:

    One of the things that initially sent me on this particular search was obtaining a copy of the family Bible, which had been at Ft. Concho since my grandmother's death in 1864. The family records were particularly interesting to me, and I believe I was the last one allowed to touch the Bible and get copies...it was extremely fragile, from having been exhibited for over 25 years at the time.

    In my great-great-grandmother's writing, "Alsey Sanders expired on the night of the 27th of October AD, 1862." "John H. Sanders Expired the 19th Day of April AD, 1863" "Andrew J. Sanders Expired January 15th AD 1864". I can't even imagine what she felt, especially knowing at least one of her sons died in Camp Douglas so far from home.

    This war is fascinating, but sometimes it's just too much to comprehend.
     
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  3. Nathanb1

    Nathanb1 Brigadier General Moderator Forum Host

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    BTW, if anyone gets bored, just jump in and start lookin'. Spring Break is a week away and I have more than one genealogy project going. :smile:
     
  4. TerryB

    TerryB Captain

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    In a way, I'm all ancestryed-out, but still want to find out as much as I can about their ACW experiences.
     
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  5. Lazy Bayou

    Lazy Bayou 1st Lieutenant

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    Nice story Nate, very interesting. Thanks for taking the time to post it.
     
  6. shanniereb

    shanniereb First Sergeant

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    I have done the same thing several times. When doing genealogy it is best to take a "break". I have found that after a "break" I can go back, check over my information and almost everytime I have found something new! Interesting story.
     
  7. Drew

    Drew 2nd Lieutenant

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    This is great stuff! I'm particulary fascinated by the migration pattern - we've go it in my family, too, from NC to Georgia, Alabama, Missiissippi, Louisiana and Texas. Imagine loading a wagon with your worldly posessions and taking your family to the great unknown.....because you "heard" there may be opportunity there? No Seven Elevens, Days Inns, pay phones, nothing, along the way, let alone when you got there?

    These folks had a degree of gumption we spoiled moderners can't even comprehend....
     
  8. tmh10

    tmh10 Major

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    I haven't even got a good start yet. Im sure when I do get started it will consume me. Looks like you are well along, Nate. Thanks for letting how much work I have in store.:smile coffee:
     
  9. Nathanb1

    Nathanb1 Brigadier General Moderator Forum Host

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    Ah. I have a good one for you, Drew....

    This is from Wills Sanders' great-granddaughter and is in the Leake Co. History book...

    (ouch)

    Apparently they changed their minds and made it back to Mississippi at some point.

    Grandpa Sanders was a relatively well-to-do man before the war, owning approximately 8,000 acres. Afterwards, he was worth less than $800.
     
  10. DixieRifles

    DixieRifles Sergeant Major Forum Host

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    Didn't I see another post about this accident? Someone posted a quote from an OR and/or journal. Did you see that?
    I'm going to Fort Pemberton in a few weeks. Maybe I can ask around about this to see if anyone has details.

    My wife maternal grandmother was a Booth. I will have to check to see when they entered Mississippi. I'm almost sure they were in the NorthEast part of the state around the 1860's. Where was your Booth from?
     
  11. Drew

    Drew 2nd Lieutenant

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    Love it! Think about it, really - so far beyond our own experience. Thanks for posting!
     
  12. TerryB

    TerryB Captain

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    Just when I thought I was burned out, someone sends me an email, having seen my posts at findagrave.com. She said she has the cross that an indirect ancestor carved while a POW at Fort Delaware! Talk about getting my attention!
     
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  13. Nathanb1

    Nathanb1 Brigadier General Moderator Forum Host

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    Apparently they came from Georgia. He seems to have been my great-great grandmother's brother..and that was also his father's name, we think. Gotta check that. They ended up between Philadelphia and Carthage (Leake-Neshoba Cos.) Zachariah Booth was the captain of Co. K, the Scotland Guards, which is what helped me understand why EVERYONE seemed to enlist in the same unit. Duh. I'm slow. I admit it.

    Yes, I've posted a link to that 33rd Miss. website before. I never thought anyone would really spell it that way (tinckering), but...LOL... one of my 8th graders did this week! :smile:
     
  14. Nathanb1

    Nathanb1 Brigadier General Moderator Forum Host

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    Again, for those who denigrate "Gone With the Wind"....it sure gave the scene when Ashley got home a whole new meaning!
     
  15. Barrycdog

    Barrycdog Captain

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    9th Battalion Georgia Artillery Company A

    Sanders John L - Mustered out of AugustaMarch 18 1862 Appears on the muster roll of Gate City Guards Company F First Regiment Ga. Paroled at Farmville, Va.April 11-21 1865. Listed in roster made by surviving members of Company A at a reunion July 26-28 1904 located at Legg Farm in Smyrna Ga. Recorded dead Distinguished at the battle of Knoxville You will excuse me in this connection to refer to the personal courage and bravery of Private John Sanders, the last man left at one of my guns (others being either killed or wounded), who, after having had both ram-rods of the gun shot in two by the rifled pieces of the Federals, split a plank and continued loading the piece and firing it, with the assistance of myself and Major Haynes, of General Buckner's staff. Southern Historical Society Papers Page 481
     
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  16. donna

    donna Lt. Colonel Forum Host

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    Thanks for posting. Always enjoy reading about people's ancestors. It does pay to reread. I have picked up different things by going over things I thought I had read in detail before.

    Also if you go on Ancestry, new things are added all the time. There are a lot of trees on now. I have gotten a lot information from them that give me starting points to find the documents to support the information.

    I guess for some reason I never get tired of the search for Ancestors.
     
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  17. ExNavyPilot

    ExNavyPilot 2nd Lieutenant

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    How true...
     
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  18. ExNavyPilot

    ExNavyPilot 2nd Lieutenant

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    Nathanb1--
    Great post. I find it fascinating to delve into one of the family lines and learn what you can about it. You start to get a feel for the family "culture" and develop an understanding for their circumstances and actions. Looking forward to hearing more from you about the Sanders. Your efforts have also given me some impetus to dig more into my Minnick line, which had multiple brothers and brothers-in-law in the war as well as some earlier martial history (Revolution & 1812).
     
  19. Greg Taylor

    Greg Taylor First Sergeant

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    I am always interested to hear any anecdote about Fort Delaware. My g-g grandfather was a Union soldier there during the fall of 1862. In this letter he describes guarding newly arrived Rebel prisoners captured at Antietam: http://wbp2ndpaha.wordpress.com/october-1862/
     
  20. TerryB

    TerryB Captain

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    All I know is that Lt. Tom Pointer of I Co, 16th Ala Inf was captured on Dec 30 or 31 in Lawrence Co, Ala, his home. There were several skirmishes there with the 10th Ind Cav. He was sent to Fort Delaware and basically I can tell that he cashed some checks, then took the oath on June 17, 1865. One day later he cashed a check for 20 dollars, I guess for transportation expenses. I hope the distant cousin sends me a picture of the cross. I have several pictures of Lt. T.S. Pointer, but none in uniform. One of the seems to be a wedding party dating to 1874 when he married.
     
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  21. PaulaPerry

    PaulaPerry Private

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    I was so glad to find this. Willis Perry Sanders Sr. was my husband's ggggrandfather. I had found a couple of these names and from the dates was sure they had been killed in the Civil War. This was a real help in fleshing out this part of the family genealogy.
     
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