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2nd South Carolina Arrives at Chickamauga

Discussion in 'Reenactors Forum' started by Legion Para, Nov 6, 2016.

  1. Legion Para

    Legion Para 2nd Lieutenant Forum Host

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    The 2nd South Carolina arrives at Chickamauga, 153rd Anniversary of Chickamauga.

     
    Sbc, Waterloo50, texaswildcat and 2 others like this.

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  3. texaswildcat

    texaswildcat Sergeant

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    At some point in the battle, didn't the 2nd South Carolina clash with the 21st Ohio on Snodgrass Hill?
     
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  4. Legion Para

    Legion Para 2nd Lieutenant Forum Host

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    Yes.

    From Wikipedua

    "Tullahoma and Chickamauga Campaigns

    Following the Battle of Stones River, the 21st remained in camp until June 1863, when it embarked on the Tullahoma Campaign. Marching and skirmishing through Tennessee and northern Georgia during the campaign, the regiment crossed over Lookout Mountain in late August and arrived in the vicinity of Chickamauga Creek on September 19. Fully engaged in the Battle of Chickamauga, the 21st O.V.I., under the command of Lt. Colonel Dwella M. Stoughton, deployed into line of battle and opened a brisk fire upon the enemy, which continued until night. The next morning, September 20, the regiment, then occupying a reserve position, witnessed the Confederate breakthrough. Lt. Colonel Stoughton immediately moved to the right and occupied the crest of a ridge, known as Snodgrass Hill, in an attempt to stem the Confederate onslaught.

    The Confederates made their first assault on the 21st O.V.I. around 11 a.m. They continued to attack throughout the morning and afternoon, but each attack was repulsed by a murderous fire from the regiment's five-shot Colt Revolving Rifles. So heavy was the volume of fire that the Confederates were convinced that they were attacking an entire division, not just a single regiment. At around 3:30 p.m., Lt. Colonel Stoughton, seated on his horse at the rear of the regiment, was fired upon by a rebel sharpshooter. Ignoring the warning, Stoughton dismounted and walked to the front of the line, where another shot rang out and the colonel, struck through the left arm, fell to the ground severely wounded. Command of the 21st O.V.I. passed to Major Arnold McMahan. Stoughton would die on November 19 from an illness that set in during his convalescence.

    By late afternoon, the 21st was desperately low on ammunition. Soldiers plundered the cartridge boxes of the dead and wounded in a frantic attempt to procure Colt's ammunition. When this reserve was depleted, a runner was sent to the rear to search the ordnance trains, but quickly discovered that they had left with the rest of the retreating Union army for Chattanooga. At dusk, having exhausted all of their ammunition, the 21st retired to the rear of the ridge, having expended 43,550 rounds of ammunition.

    The 21st was ordered to fix bayonets and occupy the extreme right flank. They managed to procure one last round of ammunition for each man. After each firing their round, the men, remaining in their position, were surrounded and quietly captured. Major Arnold McMahan, 120 soldiers and the colors of the 21st O.V.I. were now in the hands of the enemy.

    In six hours of fighting, the 21st Ohio, numbering about 540 men, lost 265 killed, wounded or captured. 46 men would eventually be sent to Andersonville prison. Only ten of the prisoners would survive."

    Artwork by Don Trioani.
    03a23caf43daa7b5498645bb29485ab4.jpg
     
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  5. CheathamHill

    CheathamHill First Sergeant Trivia Game Winner

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    Shout out to nps ranger Lee White in that video. Love that guy!
     
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  6. Chattahooch33

    Chattahooch33 Sergeant Major Forum Host Civil War Photo Contest
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    Came here to say that. No one better.
     
  7. Craig L Barry

    Craig L Barry First Sergeant

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    Saw ol' Lee White at the Stones River anniversary programs about ten days ago. He was there with the Chickamauga artillery crew. I was doing infantry so we were more or less in different sections of the battlefield most of the day, but he was there. Have to agree, Ranger Lee is indeed a stalwart. Knows his stuff, too.
     
  8. texaswildcat

    texaswildcat Sergeant

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    I've finished writing my historical-fiction of the 21st Ohio at Chickamauga and I knew that the 2nd South Carolina was one of the first to attack them on Snodgrass Hill. The 21st fired their first volley and the South Carolinians, thinking that the Buckeyes now had empty muskets, charged and were slapped by four more volleys that sent them running down the hill in surprise.
     
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