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26th N.C. Co. F

Discussion in 'Battle of Gettysburg' started by cof, May 10, 2004.

  1. cof

    cof Private

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    Hi, My great Grandfather was in Co. F. 26th N.C. Was slightly wounded in the arm on July 1, 1863. Could he have participated in the charge on the 3rd? In the late 1970's my Aunt Ada, who was in her 90's, said that he talked about how the line of battle stretched as far as he could see. I'm sure that on the 1st the line of the 26th must have been pretty long. Also I have a copy of the speech that Col. John R. Lane of the 26th gave to the North Carolina Society of Baltimore in 1903. Does anyone know anything about this society? THis is very descriptive of the action of the 26th. Thanks ,John
     

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  3. gunsmoke

    gunsmoke Guest

    Hi Dixiedewdrop

    I checked through my North Carolina information but was unable to find any information on this society. Sorry I wasn't any help to you on this one. I notice that this is your first post, let me take a moment to welcome you to the group.

    Charlie
     
  4. hoosier

    hoosier 2nd Lieutenant Forum Host

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    Between July 1 and July 3, the 26th North Carolina suffered an 85% casualty rate at Gettysburg, the highest casualty rate for any single Confederate regiment in any single battle of the Civil War.

    They engaged in a ferocious fight against the 24th Michigan in McPherson's Woods, west of Gettysburg, on July 1. The fighting was so intense that 14 different men carried the colors of the 26th NC in that action, as one color-bearer after another was shot down.

    Even after suffering such high casualties on July 1, the 26th remained on the field and participated in the Pickett-Pettigrew-Trimble charge on July 3.

    It is possible that your great-grandfather, if his wound was slight enough, might have participated in the charge on the 3rd. But if he did, and survived it, he was a very lucky man. The regiment was virtually decimated by musket and double-canister artillery fire during that charge.

    (Message edited by Hoosier on May 11, 2004)
     
  5. gary

    gary 1st Lieutenant

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    Ron Gragg wrote a book on the 26th that you may want to pick up: Covered With Glory: The 26th North Carolina in the Battle of Gettysburg. Those poor boys. They were decimated by the first day's battle and then sent in to be finished off by the third.[​IMG]
     
  6. hoosier

    hoosier 2nd Lieutenant Forum Host

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    Dixiedewdrop, if you're still around - the website for the 8th Ohio contains a link to a history of that regiment, including their account of the battle of Gettysburg. The 8th Ohio was positioned on the northern flank of the Pickett-Pettigrew-Trimble charge, which means the Confederates closest to them most likely would have been North Carolinians.

    That account specifically says that wounded and rear-echelon troops did participate in the Confederate charge.

    This still isn't specific to the 26th North Carolina or to Company F, but if the Confederates needed troops badly enough to include wounded men in the North Carolina portion of the charge, it seems very possible that your great-grandfather did, indeed, participate.

    Incidentally, my great-grandfather was in the 16th Vermont, which was positioned on the southern flank, where the Virginians were.
     
  7. cof

    cof Private

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    George, I'll click on the 8th Ohio website. Aunt Ada told us years ago that William had mentioned everyone took cover at a fence. This may have been Emmitsburg road? She also said he had to tie anything he could find to the bottom of his feet. I don't know if he watched the charge or participated. I don't know if he tied something to his feet while at Gettysburg or some other time. I was more interested in tracing the family tree. I really didn't know much about the war then. Didn't know he was in the 26th until I talked to her. Wish I had ask her more about what she knew,but, I didn't know what to ask. Thanks for the information about the 8th Ohio
     
  8. traveller

    traveller Cadet

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    I envy all you guys and gals who had ancestors that fought. It must provide an enormous motivation for your interest and research. I can't imagine the pride you all must feel. All my ancestors arrived from a German area of Russia in the late nineteenth century. On of my distant cousins has written a book on their experiences. I have located it, but as of yet I haven't had a chance to read it. Good luck to everyone in finding your roots.

    Traveller
     
  9. ygor

    ygor Cadet

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    Hello to all. I'm new on this board. I was intrigued to see a 26th NC topic on the board!! I have been doing genealogy research for sometime and I have found that my wife's great-great uncle served in Co K on the 26th NC. His name was Montfort Stokes McRae, called Stokes by his friends, and he came from Mangum in Richmond Co, NC.

    Stokes McRae enlisted in 1861 as a private in Wadesboro NC in the company known as the Pee Dee Wildcats that later became Company K. He was with the 26th during their posting on the Carolina coast in Cartaret Co. While there he became engaged to Emeline Piggot who later became quite famous as a spy for the Confederacy.

    By the Battle of Gettysburg, Stokes McRae had been promoted to Sergeant Major of the regiment. I believe he was wounded on July 1st during the assault on the position of the Iron Brigade on McPherson's Ridge. Stokes was wounded in leg and the bullet broke his thIgh bone. He died a month after the battle in Camp Letterman, the hospital camp that remained to treat the wounded of both armies just east of the town of Gettysburg.

    Any information/photographs on the 26th NC would be very welcome.

    Dave Miller
     
  10. raywilson

    raywilson Cadet

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    Dave,

    Welcome to the website! I think you'll like it. And thanks for the interesting family history.

    Regards,
    Ray
     

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