1. Welcome to the CivilWarTalk, a forum for questions and discussions about the American Civil War! Become a member today for full access to all of our resources, it's fast, simple, and absolutely free! If you aren't ready for that, try posting your question or comment as a guest!

1863 Zouave rifle at reenactments

Discussion in 'Civil War Weapons and Ammunition' started by TexasReb, Oct 2, 2008.

  1. TexasReb

    TexasReb Cadet

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2008
    Messages:
    2
    Location:
    Texas
    I've been reenacting for about a year. I've been told that my T/C Hawken wouldn't be allowed at National events. I found a great deal on a 1863 Remington 2 band rifle. Now I've been told that they weren't issued during the Civil War. Does that mean I can't use the 1863 Zouave rifle at National events either?

  2. (Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)
  3. M E Wolf

    M E Wolf Brigadier General Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2008
    Messages:
    15,786
    Location:
    Virginia
    Dear TexasReb,

    Welcome to the Civil War Talk Forums.

    Hopefully, a re-enactor or more will speak up--as well as our military ordnance experts!

    Respectfully submitted,
    M. E. Wolf
  4. johan_steele

    johan_steele Lt. Colonel Retired Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2005
    Messages:
    11,433
    Location:
    South of the North 40
    You've hit upon one of my pet peeves. The Zouve is not allowed at any National event, it isn't allowed at any event w/ standards that I know of. Neither is the Hawken. Both weapons scream poorly research impression and usually get those who carry them branded w/ a rather disparaging title.

    There is no conclusive evidence that the Zouve ever saw service except perhaps on guard duty during the war. A few might have been in the trenches at Petersburg. The Hawken can at least claim some very limited use... by US sharpshooters in the west.

    As the CS never captured any, never built anything w/ more than a vague passing resemblence to the Zouve it has no place in any kind of CS impression.

    Put the money you might spend on a Zouve towards a M1842, P53, P56, P58, M1861/63 series, M1841, Richmond etc. There are plenty out there and you don't have to spend a fortune to get something appropriate.

    I would suggest researching what the unit you portray actually carried and go that route. Your weapon is the most expensive part of your kit, make it a worthwhile investment.
  5. gary

    gary 1st Lieutenant

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2005
    Messages:
    4,340
    Like Johan suggested, find a unit and you'll get a free mentor (or a platoon of mentors) and they'll tell you what arm was carried by that unit.
  6. samgrant

    samgrant Captain Retired Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2005
    Messages:
    5,018
    Location:
    Galena, Illinois 61036 U.S.A.
  7. M E Wolf

    M E Wolf Brigadier General Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2008
    Messages:
    15,786
    Location:
    Virginia
    Dear List Members;

    I do know in researching the Northeastern Virginia area during the American Civil War; the Zouaves were active and one died pulling down the Confederate flag from the Marshall house in Alexandria, VA. They would also be assigned to a Brigade at the First Battle of Manassas/Bull Run.

    O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME 2 [S# 2] -- CHAPTER IX.
    Advance of Union Army into Virginia and occupation of Arlington Heights and Alexandria.
    No. 4. -- Report of Lieut. Col. N. L. Farnham, First Zouaves, New York Militia.
    ALEXANDRIA, VA., May 24, 1861--5.18 p.m.
    SIR: It is my painful duty to inform you that Colonel Ellsworth, late commanding officer of the First Zouave Regiment, New York Militia, is no more. He was assassinated at the Marshall House after our troops had taken possession of the city.
    I am ignorant of the details of the orders issued to the regiment, and await further instructions. My men are posted advantageously in the streets.
    I remain, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
    NOAH L. FARNHAM,
    Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding First Zouaves.
    Brig. Gen. MANSFIELD,
    Commanding Department, Washington.
    -----
    O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME 2 [S# 2] -- CHAPTER IX.
    Engagement at Big Bethel, or Bethel Church, Va.
    No. 11. -- Report of Maj. E. B. Montague, commanding Virginia Battalion.
    [excerpt]
    A very short time after the firing commenced I received an order to direct one of my companies, the Chatham Grays, under the command of Captain Werth, to defend a ford one mile below the bridge against the first battalion of the New York Zouave Regiment, and I saw no more of the company until after the fight.
    ---------------------------------
    O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME 2 [S# 2] -- CHAPTER IX.
    Engagement at Big Bethel, or Bethel Church, Va.
    No. 12. -- Reports of Capt. W. H. Werth, commanding Chatham Grays.
    [excerpt]
    CAMP YORKTOWN, June 13, 1861.
    [excerpt]
    A portion of the Fifth New York Zouave Regiment (three companies) was at this time advancing down the opposite bank of the stream for the purpose of crossing the ford, and thereby turn our left flank. I saw the movement, and at once took double quick and made the distance of over a mile in about nine minutes beating the zouaves, and getting in position at the ford in time to cause them to halt. I obstructed the ford in all conceivable ways by felling trees, &c., and then placed my first platoon on the northwest side, trader cover of an old mill-dam, whilst my second platoon I placed in ambush on the opposite side, where the road leading to the ford could have been raked for four hundred yards with deadly effect.
    ---------------------------------
    O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME 2 [S# 2] -- CHAPTER IX.
    JULY 16-22, 1861.--The Bull Run, or Manassas, Campaign, Virginia.
    No. 7. -- Report of Maj. John G. Barnard, U.S. Corps of Engineers.
    [excerpt]
    When we reached the front of Hunter's column, the battle was just commencing. The events of the battle-field will be described in the reports you will receive from other quarters. I was near the commanding general until some time after the arrival of Sherman's brigade on our left. Being accidentally separated, I saw yourself on the right, and, joining you, we observed for some time the action on the heights, where the enemy made his final and successful stand. As we were observing, the zouave regiment of Heintzelman was driven back, leaving Ricketts' battery, upon which we observed the enemy charge.
    --------------------------------------
    O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME 5 [S# 5]
    NOVEMBER 14-22, 1861.--Expedition through Accomac and Northampton Counties, Virginia.
    No. 2. -- Reports of Maj. Gen. John A. Dix, U. S. Army.
    [excerpt]
    In order to overawe opposition, I propose to send a force of 3,500 men. The troops sent from here on Monday and General Lockwood's command will amount to about that number. If I find the latter too raw, I can send 500 of the Zouave Regiment from Federal Hill and an equal number from some other regiment here, so as to have a well-trained force of 2,500 men with the expedition. They can be spared for ten days or a fortnight, and as they have been in camp several months, a little service in the field will be useful to them.
    -----------------------------------------
    O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME 9 [S# 9]
    CORRESPONDENCE. ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING SPECIALLY TO OPERATIONS IN SOUTHEASTERN VIRGINIA FROM JANUARY 11 TO MARCH 17, 1862.
    CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.
    Organization of the troops in the Department of the Peninsula, commanded by Maj. Gen. J. Bankhead Magruder, C. S. Army, January 31, 1862.
    Yorktown, vicinity, and Ship Point.
    FIRST DIVISION.
    Brig. Gen. G. J. RAINS, commanding.
    13th Alabama.
    2d Florida.
    6th Georgia.
    23d Georgia.
    14th Louisiana.
    Louisiana Zouave Battalion.
    2d Mississippi.
    15th North Carolina.
    32d Virginia (2 companies).
    53d Virginia (8 companies).
    115th Virginia Militia.
    Maurin's Louisiana Battery.
    Nelson's battery.
    1st Virginia (3 companies) Artillery.
    --------------------------------------------
    O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XIX/2 [S# 28]
    Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Northern Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, And Pennsylvania, From September 3 To November 14, 1862.
    UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#15
    NEW YORK, November 3, 1862.
    Brig. Gen. M. C. MEIGS,
    Quartermaster-General, U.S. Army, Washington, D.C.:
    GENERAL: In reply to your telegram of this date, directing me to report the gross quantities of supplies shipped by me to the army operating about Harper's Ferry, Frederick, Sharpsburg, Williamsport, &c., since the 17th September, I send you the following:
    In reply to your telegram to-day, there were shipped on 10th October 20,000 blankets, in 200 bales, and 10,000 shelter-tents, h: 134 cases, to Colonel Ingalls, Harper's Ferry; on the 23d October, 7,500 lined blouses and 7,500 knit jackets, in 116 cases, to Captain Bliss, Harper's Ferry; on October 29, 1,100 Zouave uniforms, in 25 cases, to Capt. P. P Pitkin, for Colonel Hawkins' regiment New York Volunteers, Berlin. The cases averaged 20 feet in bulk and the bales 30 feet.
    I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant.
    D. H. VINTON,
    Lieutenant-Colonel and Deputy Quartermaster. General.
    --------------------------------------------------
    Dyer's Compendium, Pt. 3 (Regimental Histories)
    PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEERS.
    2nd REGIMENT INFANTRY ("FIRE ZOUAVE REGIMENT").
    Organized at Philadelphia August 10, 1861. Moved to Washington, D.C., August, 1861. At Munson's Hill till September 30. Attached to Baker's Brigade, Stone's (Sedgwick's) Division, Army Potomac, to March, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 2nd Army Corps, Army Potomac, to June, 1864. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 2nd Army Corps, to August, 1864.
    SERVICE.--Moved to Poolesville, Md., September 30, 1861, and duty on the Upper Potomac till February, 1862. At Harper's Ferry till March 24. Moved to the Virginia Peninsula March 24-April 1. Siege of Yorktown April 5-May 4. Moved to West Point May 7. At Tyler's Farm till May 31. Battle
    of Fair Oaks (Seven Pines) May 31-June 1. At Fair Oaks till June 28. Near Fair Oaks June 8. Seven Pines June 15. Fair Oaks June 19. Seven days before Richmond June 25-July 1. Battles of Peach Orchard and Savage Station June 29; Charles City Cross Roads and Glendale June 30; Malvern Hill July 1. At Harrison's Landing till August 16. Movement to Newport News, thence to Alexandria August 16-28, and to Centreville and Chantilly August 28-30. Cover Pope's retreat August 31-September 1. Maryland Campaign September 6-24. Battle of Antietam September 16-17. Moved to Harper's Ferry September 22, and duty there till October 30. Reconnoissance to Charlestown October 16-17. Movement to Falmouth, Va., October 30-November 20. Battle of Fredericksburg December 12-15. Burnside's second Campaign, "Mud March," January 20-24, 1863. At Falmouth till April. Hartwood Church February 25. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Banks Ford May 1 and 4. Gettysburg (Pa.) Campaign June 13-July 24. Battle of Gettysburg July 2-4. Pursuit of Lee July 5-24. At Banks Ford and Culpeper till October. Advance from the Rappahannock to the Rapidan September 13-17. Bristoe Campaign October 9-22. Advance to line of the Rappahannock November 7-8. Mine Run Campaign November 26-December 2. Robertson's Tavern or Locust Grove November 27. Duty on the Rapidan till May, 1864. Demonstration on the Rapidan February 6-7. Rapidan Campaign May 4-June 12. Battles of
    the Wilderness May 5-7; Laurel Hill May 8; Spottsylvania May 8-12; Po River May 12-21. Assault on the Salient May 12. North Anna River May 23-26. On line of the Pamunkey May 26-28. Totopotomoy May 28-31. Cold Harbor June 1-12. Before Petersburg June 16-18. Siege of Petersburg June 16-August 20. Jerusalem Plank Road June 22-23. Demonstration north of the James at Deep Bottom July 27-29. Deep Bottom July 27-28. Mine Explosion, Petersburg, July 30 (Reserve). Mustered out at Philadelphia August 24, 1864.
    Regiment lost during service 11 Officers and 182 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 69 Enlisted men by disease. Total 264.
    ----------------------
    FOX’S REGIMENTAL LOSSES
    Chapter X.—44th New York Infantry--"Ellsworth's Avengers."
    Bartlett' Brigade--Griffin's Division--5th Corps.
    BATTLES. K. &M.W. BATTLES. K. &M.W.
    Yorktown, Va 1 Rappahannock Station, Va 3
    Hanover C. H., Va 34 Wilderness, Va 12
    Gaines's Mill, Va 17 Spotsylvania, Va 21
    Malvern Hill, Va 21 North Anna, Va 1
    Manassas, Va 13 Bethesda Church, Va 6
    Fredericksburg, Va 7 Petersburg, Va 5
    Chancellorsville, Va 1 Poplar Spring Church, Va 2
    Middleburg, Va 1 Place unknown. 1
    Gettysburg, Pa 36
    Present, also, at Seven Days; Antietam; Shepherdstown; Mine Run; Totopotomoy; Weldon Road.
    NOTES.--The enlisted men in this regiment were the finest of any in the service. They were recruited from every county in the State, in conformity to requirements calling for unmarried, able-bodied men, not over thirty years of age, not under five feet eight inches in height, and of good moral character. The men were of a high order of intelligence, and when the regiment was organized it was found that the average age was twenty-two, and the average height five feet ten and one-half inches. The men wore a zouave uniform during the first year of their service. At Hanover Court House, its first battle, the Forty-fourth made a gallant fight, losing 27 killed and 59 wounded; at Gaines's Mill--Lieutenant-Colonel Rice commanding --it lost 5 killed, 22 wounded, and 29 missing; and at Malvern Hill, 11 killed, 84 wounded, and 4 missing, out of 225 who were engaged. The regiment was then in Butterfield's Brigade of Morell's (1st) Division. Two new companies (C and E) joined in October, 1862 (one of them composed of students from the State Normal School at Albany), and took the place of two companies which had been consolidated with the others. At Gettysburg,--then in Vincent's Brigade, Barnes's Division, -- the Forty-fourth was one of the first regiments to seize and hold Little Round Top, meeting its greatest loss there; casualties, 20 killed, 82 wounded, and 3 missing; total, 111. At Manassas,-Major Freeman Conner commanding,--the regiment lost 5 killed, 48 wounded, and 18 missing, out of 12 officers and 148 men in action; at the Wilderness, it lost 4 killed and 63 wounded; and at Spotsylvania, 8 killed, 48 wounded, and 9 missing. Mustered out September 24, 1864.
    ---------------------------------------
    FOX’S REGIMENTAL LOSSES
    Chapter X.—140th New York Infantry.
    Weed's Brigade--Ayres's Division--5th Corps.
    BATTLES. K. &M.W. BATTLES. K. &M.W.
    Chancellorsville, Va 4 Siege of Petersburg, Va 5
    Gettysburg, Pa 42 Weldon Railroad, Va 7
    Wilderness, Va 55 Poplar Spring Church, Va 1
    Spotsylvania, Va 17 Hatcher's Run, Va 5
    Bethesda Church, Va 3 White Oak Road, Va 3
    Picket Line, Va 2 Five Forks, Va 6
    Present, also, at Fredericksburg; Rappahannock Station; Mine Run— North Anna; Totopotomoy; White Oak Swamp (1864); Appomattox.
    NOTES.— Organized at Rochester, N.Y., and mustered into service September 13, 1862, leaving the State on September 20. The regiment joined the Army of the Potomac in November, and was assigned to Warren's (3d) Brigade, Sykes's (2d) Division, Fifth Corps. It was present with this command at Fredericksburg, where it was under fire for the first time, a few of the men being wounded there. Colonel O'Rorke was killed at Gettysburg while leading his men into action on Little Round Top, where their prompt action aided largely in seizing that important position, the regiment losing there 26 killed, 89 wounded, and 18 missing; total 133. The One Hundred and Fortieth was then in Ayres's Division— the division of regulars. In 1864 the regulars were brigaded in one command under Ayres, and the One Hundred and Fortieth was placed in the same brigade; the division was commanded by General Charles Griffin. But in June, 1864, the regiment was transferred to the First Brigade of Ayres's (2d) Division. This brigade was commanded in turn by Colonel Gregory, General Joseph Hayes, Colonel Otis, and General Winthrop. The latter officer fell mortally wounded at Five Forks. The regiment was in the hottest of the fighting at the Wilderness, and suffered severely there, losing 23 killed, 118 wounded, and 114 captured or missing; total, 255. Three days later— on May 8th— it was engaged in the first of the series of battles at Spotsylvania, in which action Colonel Ryan and Major Milo L. Starks were killed. At Spotsylvania the casualties in the regiment were 12 killed and 48 wounded; and at the Weldon Railroad, 4 killed, 19 wounded, and 51 captured or missing. The regiment was composed of exceptionally good material; the men were a neat, clean lot, and in their handsome Zouave costume attracted favorable attention wherever they appeared.
    ---------------------------------------
    CONTINUED
  8. M E Wolf

    M E Wolf Brigadier General Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2008
    Messages:
    15,786
    Location:
    Virginia
    FOX’S REGIMENTAL LOSSES
    Chapter X.—146th New York Infantry.
    Ayres's Brigade--Griffin's Division--5th Corps.
    Fredericksburg, Va 1 Totopotomoy, Va 1
    Chancellorsville, Va 5 Bethesda Church, Va 7
    Gettysburg, Pa 7 Petersburg, Va. (assault, 1864) 8
    Williamsport, Md 1 Siege of Petersburg, Va 4
    Mine Run, Va 1 Weldon Railroad, Va 6
    Wilderness, Va 65 White Oak Road, Va 13
    Spotsylvania, Va 7 Five Forks, Va 5
    North Anna, Va 2
    Present, also, at Rappahannock Station; Bristoe Station; White Oak Swamp (1864); Hatcher's Run; Chapel House; Appomattox.
    NOTES.— — Recruited in Oneida county, and organized at Rome, N.Y. It was mustered into the service of the United States on October 10, 1862, and proceeded immediately to Washington. In November, 1862, it joined the Army of the Potomac at Snicker's Gap, Va., where it was assigned to Warren's Brigade, Sykes's Division, Fifth Corps, a division composed mostly of regulars. It marched with them to Fredericksburg, where it participated in its first battle. When the Duryée Zouaves were mustered out, in May, 1863, the recruits of that famous regiment were transferred to the One Hundred and Forty-sixth; they numbered 283 men, and were a valuable accession. In 1864, a similar transfer was made from the Forty-fourth New York when this regiment went home. The regiment encountered its severest fighting at the battle of the Wilderness, May 5, 1864, where it suffered a terrible loss, not only in killed and wounded, but in captured men, nearly 200 having been taken prisoners. Colonel Jenkins and Major Henry H. Curran were killed in that bloody encounter, while the total loss of the regiment was 20 killed, 6 7 wounded, and 225 captured or missing. In 1865, the regiment was in Winthrop's (1st) Brigade, Ayres's (2d) Division, and was prominently engaged in that command at the battles of White Oak Road, and Five Forks, General Winthrop being killed in the latter engagement while leading a successful charge of the brigade. The One Hundred and Forty-sixth was well drilled, and at one time wore a conspicuous Zouave uniform. General Joseph Hayes, its last brigade commander, in taking leave of the regiment wrote,— that "associated for a long time with the infantry of the Regular Army, the One Hundred and Forty-sixth yields the palm to none." The war having ended, the regiment was mustered out of service July 16, 1865.
    ---------------------------
    FOX’S REGIMENTAL LOSSES
    Chapter X.—72nd Pennsylvania Infantry--" Baxter Zouaves."
    Philadelphia Brigade--Gibbon's Division--2nd Corps.
    BATTLES. K. &M.W. BATTLES. K. &M.W.
    Fair Oaks, Va 3 Mine Run, Va 2
    Picket, Va. (June 1862) 6 Wilderness, Va 7
    Savage Station, Va 24 Spotsylvania, Va 5
    Antietam, Md 58 Totopotomoy, Va 1
    Fredericksburg, Va 9 Cold Harbor, Va 6
    Gettysburg, Pa 64 Petersburg, Va }
    Bristoe Station, Va 1 Jerusalem Road, Va. } 7
    Present, also, at Yorktown; Peach Orchard; Glendale; Malvern Hill; Chantilly; Chancellorsville; North Anna.
    NOTES.--Recruited in Philadelphia as a "Fire Zouave" regiment. It was organized in August, 1861, with fifteen companies, five of which were disbanded in 1862 and the men distributed to the other ten companies. In the fall of 1861, the regiment was in Stone's Division, which was guarding the Maryland side of the Upper Potomac. In March, 1862, it moved up the Shenandoah Valley in Banks's command, but was transferred soon after to the Peninsular Army. There the Philadelphia Brigade was placed under command of General Wm. W. Burns, and was assigned to Sedgwick's Division. At Savage Station--one of the Seven Days battles--the regiment lost 14 killed and 85 wounded; at Antietam it fought under Sedgwick at the Dunker Church, where it lost 38 killed, 163 wounded, and 36 missing; total, 237. General Alex. S. Webb commanded the brigade at Gettysburg. In that battle the Seventy-second occupied an exposed position during the terrible artillery firing of the third day, and then took a conspicuous part in the repulse of Pickett's Virginians. The monument of the Seventy-second, which stands on that historic spot, states in its inscription, that the regiment had 473 men in line that day and that their loss was 44 killed, 145 wounded, and 2 missing; total, 191. At Mine Run, Lieutenant-Colonel Theodore Hesser was killed on the skirmish line, while in command of the regiment. Its shortened lines were actively engaged in all the battles of the Wilderness campaign, and then, while in the trenches before Petersburg, August, 1864, it received the order for its muster-out.
    ----------------------------------------------
    (Just a small sample-that the Zouaves weren't just walking guard duty)

    Respectfully submitted for consideration,
    M. E. Wolf
  9. ole

    ole Brev. Brig. Gen'l Retired Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2005
    Messages:
    29,477
    Location:
    Near Kankakee
    I think what Johan was saying that a Zouave regiment didn't necessarily carry a Zouave Rifle-musket. Don't know where the name came from, but if Johann says it wasn't in use, it wasn't.

    So it depends on your unit and the regulations of the reenactments in which you participate. If your unit stages a camp-out and some field games, you can get away with what they will allow. If y'all go to someone else's affair, then you have to play by their rules. It's part of involvement.

    As Johan has mentioned, there are affordable repops out there. You might consider selling yours to get one of what Johan suggested -- nobody can fault you for carrying one of those. If it wasn't issued, you lifted it on the battlefield.

    Ole
  10. johan_steele

    johan_steele Lt. Colonel Retired Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2005
    Messages:
    11,433
    Location:
    South of the North 40
    Sam, there is some argument and even some evidence that the 1863 Zouve Rifle MAY have seen service in the arms of sentries around Washington but the outstanding condition of the existing suggests they probably never left the arsenal.

    As to the Zouve... yes plenty saw quite a bit of hard campaigning. I got lazy and used the term "Zouve" to describe the 1863 Remington Rifle, commonly reffered to as the Zouve. Sorry.
  11. Mark Wadsworth

    Mark Wadsworth Cadet

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2006
    Messages:
    676
    Location:
    Orlando FL
    Another reason the Zauove musket is not allowed in most reenacting units that have standards is doe to the musket being shorter it does not business end does not stick out as far as a 3 band and makes for a nice flash up cluse to other soldiers faces. Some folks say that they can be in the front rank and not worry about it. Well anyone who has been throught a few battles can say that you don't always stay in the same spot the whole time in the ranks when you adjust for losses and such.

    Also inless you use it as a leaner you can't build a stack with a zauove of the others have 3 bands.
  12. Savez

    Savez Sergeant Major

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2009
    Messages:
    2,428
    Location:
    Alabama
    I've always wondered where one might do this kind of research. Would the state archives have ordnance reports? And also what about Quartermaster reports showing what kind of uniforms, knapsacks, shoes and the sort. Where would I find those? I noticed that artist Don Troiani sometimes references to these type of reports, I've always wondered where they were located and how to access them.
  13. M E Wolf

    M E Wolf Brigadier General Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2008
    Messages:
    15,786
    Location:
    Virginia
    Dear Savez;

    The only suggestion I would make, is looking at state Zouave units, as all the Zouaves weren't uniformed exactly the same. Each Zouave unit was dressed uniquely.


    Most times the Quartermaster would order for their state Zouave units, here is a snippet:
    O.R.--SERIES III--VOLUME IV [S# 125]
    CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, REPORTS, AND RETURNS OF THE UNION AUTHORITIES FROM JANUARY 1, 1864, TO APRIL 30, 1865.(*)--#37
    LIST OF PAPERS ACCOMPANYING THE REPORT OF THE QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL, 1864.
    No. 1.--The report of Brig. Gen. Rufus Ingalls, chief quartermaster of the armies operating against Richmond, for 1864. (Inclosures.) His annual report for fiscal year ending June 30, 1863, and a copy of report regarding the operations of the Quartermaster's Department during the battle of Chancellorsville.(*)
    No. 2.--Copy of letter from Robert H. Ramsey, assistant adjutant-general, to Bvt. Brig. Gen. J. L. Donaldson, chief quartermaster Department of the Cumberland, by order of the major-general commanding.(+)
    No. 3.--Extract from annual report of Capt. James M. Moore, assistant quartermaster, depot of Washington, D.C., relating to the national cemeteries and the burial of deceased soldiers, and others dying in the service of the United States in hospitals in and about Washington.
    No. 4.--Abstract of appropriations for the Quartermaster's Department for the fiscal years 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, and including arrearages for 1861.
    No. 5.--Monthly statement of clothing and camp and garrison equipage reported on hand at the various depots for 1st of July, 1864.
    No. 6.--Report of principal articles of clothing and equipage received at the principal purchasing and manufacturing depots during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1864.
    No. 7.--List of vessels owned by the United States October 15, 1864 (sea steamers).
    No. 8.--Statement of vessels chartered or employed by the Quartermaster's Department during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1864.(++)
    [excerpt]
    No. 5.
    Monthly statement of clothing reported on hand at the various clothing depots for July 1, 1864.
    A New York. F Baltimore.
    B Philadelphia. G Augusta.
    C Cincinnati. H Boston.
    D Saint Louis. I Fortress Monroe.
    E Washington.

    Articles of clothing. A B C D E F G H I
    Uniform coats:
    Engineers 758 2,344 .... .... .... .... .... .... ....
    Ordnance .... 1,925 .... .... 87 .... .... 20 ....
    Artillery 8,125 14,359 .... 5,118 4,955 3,643 .... 3,707 1,585
    Infantry 43,131 25,961 38,620 9,935 45,506 4,468 1,154 12,493 6,542
    Uniform jackets:
    Cavalry .... 33,006 .... 8,919 7,250 7,099 190 3,634 4,590
    Artillery 2,860 18,881 2,615 4,555 8,234 2,337 80 2,042 1,497
    Infantry 913 .... .... .... .... .... .... .... 3,613
    Zouave .... .... .... .... .... 21 .... .... 51
    Knit .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... ....
    Invalid Corps 1,373 11,239 11,188 200 5,133 983 .... 599 788
    Uniform trousers:
    Footmen .... 70,609 .... 25,703 33,535 18,393 236 7,195 28,985
    Horsemen .... 36,025 6,435 35,640 9,176 14,157 328 4,320 7,151
    Zouave .... .... .... .... .... 16 .... .... 30
    Knit .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... ....
    Cotton-duck trousers .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... ....
    Zouave vests .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... ....
    Overalls 2,951 2,127 2,000 7,381 .... 365 .... .... 2,800
    Drawers 250,392 148,296 513,392 48,909 133,989 24,980 246 20,291 25,555
    Shirts:
    Flannel 257,411 708,065 377,633 95,188 153,846 24,875 943 14,942 17,835
    Knit 108,593 .... .... 5,196 442 .... 269 6,024 ....
    Zouave .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... ....
    Greatcoats:
    Footmen 197,703 152,968 29,298 53,117 33,904 6,698 694 9,714 1,969
    Horsemen 50,382 59,230 57,913 14,402 10,908 5,850 349 1,317 581
    Straps for greatcoats 353,622 404,126 163,268 77,912 12,633 30,759 .... 14,624 19,680
    No. 5.--Monthly statement of clothing reported on hand, &c.--Continued.
    A New York. D Saint Louis. G Augusta.
    B Philadelphia. E Washington. H Boston.
    C Cincinnati. F Baltimore. I Fortress Monroe.

    Articles of clothing. A B C D E F G H I
    Blankets:
    Woolen 87,570 19,394 45,651 40,247 62,180 9,034 118 7,382 9,679
    Rubber and painted 13,676 .... 19,094 1,225 6,574 6,680 762 4,934 20,516
    Ponchos 57,391 29,492 .... 30,871 1,795 6,459 200 5,327 ....
    Talmas .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... ....
    Sack coats:
    Lined 204,000 .... 21,520 2,036 .... 9,986 828 7,869 11,618
    Unlined 84,997 .... .... 34,182 6,750 14,571 26 364 1
    Knit 786 .... .... .... .... .... .... .... 844
    Bootees 428,393 431,625 203,877 91,676 132,174 19,947 1,767 7,710 22,181
    Boots 87,001 85,380 27,938 26,550 23,346 6,010 504 5,423 6,067
    Leggings, zouave, &c. .... 8,031 .... 122 8,784 356 993 .... 5,166
    Stockings 313,011 91,498 233,301 119,961 195,737 42,927 2,302 13,892 47,688
    Stocks, leather 53,773 34,457 30,925 8,753 6,246 1,848 .... 21,059 27,431
    Uniform hats:
    Trimmed .... .... .... 42,432 .... .... .... .... ....
    Untrimmed 140,611 68,357 21,075 41,623 1,933 4,977 .... 22,187 2,710
    Uniform caps 154 1,145 .... .... .... 20 .... .... 1,001
    Forage caps 36,620 122,131 24,745 20,250 43,990 5,871 4,350 6,894 18,012
    Zouave caps .... 4,201 .... .... .... 3 .... .... 73
    Cap covers 220,501 39,056 21,808 975 .... .... 2,810 2,630 ....
    Stable frocks 71,342 3,217 7,945 10,146 4,854 1,348 576 450 1,221
    Sashes 6,176 2,479 632 2,389 642 184 .... 446 66
    Gloves .... .... 4 211 55 .... .... .... ....
    Mittens .... .... 30,243 8,087 50,355 .... .... .... 23
    Knapsacks 74,159 97,791 92,297 17,501 21,926 8,651 149 13,715 8,332
    Haversacks 58,684 78,712 3,988 19,615 36,006 13,318 70 14,738 ....
    Canteens 52,402 176,453 47,732 23,084 41,458 11,335 .... 14,404 262
    CONTINUED
  14. M E Wolf

    M E Wolf Brigadier General Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2008
    Messages:
    15,786
    Location:
    Virginia
    A Harrisburg. D Columbus. G Steubenville.
    B Wheeling. E Fort Leavenworth. H Pittsburg.
    C Indianapolis. F Quincy. I Detroit.

    Articles of clothing. A B C D E F G H I
    Uniform coats:
    Engineers .... .... .... .... 120 .... .... .... ....
    Ordnance .... .... .... .... 67 .... .... .... 2
    Artillery .... .... .... .... 395 .... .... .... ....
    Infantry 23,197 719 11,180 8,599 12,677 2,331 .... 15,116 4,381
    Uniform jackets:
    Cavalry 3,366 3,660 3,872 2,951 7,169 88 .... 4,365 2,047
    Artillery 1,629 320 1,187 764 865 60 .... 303 491
    Infantry .... .... 5,426 .... .... 1,161 .... 202 ....
    Zouave .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... ....
    Knit 4,199 .... .... .... .... .... .... .... ....
    Invalid Corps .... .... .... .... .... 47 .... 160 ....
    Uniform trousers:
    Footmen 27,190 7,050 21,602 8,057 4,374 7,756 10,602 3,107 1,934
    Horsemen 2,687 2,966 3,211 2,754 6,208 91 2,079 3,109 2,397
    Zouave .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... ....
    Knit .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... ....
    Cotton-duck trousers .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... ....
    Zouave vests .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... ....
    Overalls .... .... .... .... 23 .... .... .... ....
    Drawers 11,860 7,067 .... 18,271 19,114 459 1,634 12,193 4,903
    Shirts:
    Flannel 42,274 2,016 37,023 12,248 23,057 1,957 1,268 14,840 5,022
    Knit .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... ....
    Zouave .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... ....
    Greatcoats:
    Footmen 3,515 5,320 10,255 2,125 12,303 519 .... 7,999 1,834
    Horsemen 1,926 7,321 4,707 337 15,219 298 .... 3,432 2,034
    Straps for greatcoats 11,698 .... 7,074 28,072 58,193 .... .... 11,487 10,405
    Blankets:
    Woolen 7,621 7,604 19,594 9,726 16,234 1,625 .... 11,656 3,932
    Rubber and painted 2,964 2,050 20,524 3 4,961 350 .... .... ....
    rticles of clothing. A B C D E F G H I
    Ponchos 4,194 4,350 1 10,164 .... .... .... .... 1
    Talmas .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... ....
    Sack coats:
    Lined 401 3,042 .... 3,526 13,995 358 1,954 826 208
    Unlined 15,388 674 20,599 .... 4,919 1,176 776 568 ....
    Knit .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... ....
    Bootees 33,878 4,950 43,109 32,832 33,535 297 .... 3,105 2,306
    Boots 2,911 407 2,736 2,173 4,061 154 .... 1,360 1,339
    Leggings, zouave, &c. .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... ....
    Stockings 45,287 6,234 34,385 16,632 30,199 267 .... 4,179 5,759
    Stocks, leather 589 1,323 16,153 16,095 22,373 .... .... 3,985 2,769
    Uniform hats:
    Trimmed .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... ....
    Untrimmed 7,220 2,802 10,418 2,655 23,484 140 .... 2,163 17
    Uniform caps .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... ....
    Forage caps 18,046 3,493 20,685 13,189 20,816 44 .... 12,875 2,799
    Zouave caps .... .... .... .... .... .... .... .... ....
    Cap covers 5,076 4,086 .... 15,380 47 .... .... 7,550 ....
    Stable frocks 2,032 .... 922 1,955 .... .... .... 3,199 2,140
    Sashes .... 30 157 200 216 .... .... .... 10
    Gloves .... .... .... 200 .... .... .... .... ....
    Mittens 2,441 .... .... .... 140,020 .... .... 12 ....
    Knapsacks 20,767 5,044 29,583 9,352 7,673 775 .... 10,501 2,211
    Haversacks 35,039 8,355 27,052 6,035 8,039 537 .... 7,939 2,026
    Canteens 180,628 2,174 25,706 8,085 9,498 347 .... 5,523 4,735

    A Louisville. D Madison. G Cairo.
    B Davenport. E Springfield. H Total on hand.
    C Chicago F Saint Paul.
    Articles of clothing. A B C D E F G H
    Uniform coats:
    Engineers .... .... .... .... .... .... .... 3,222
    Ordnance .... 13 .... 4 .... .... .... 2,114
    Artillery 500 1 .... 500 .... .... .... 43,888
    Infantry 6,022 2,299 2,642 2,992 11,715 6,397 3,871 301,928
    Uniform jackets:
    Cavalry 1,966 13 2,440 1,273 3,532 3,301 700 105,431
    Artillery 1,017 .... 1,726 546 1,042 .... 566 53,617
    Infantry 230 .... 119 .... .... .... 313 11,977
    Zouave .... .... .... .... .... .... .... 72
    Knit 8,870 .... 3,985 .... .... .... .... 17,054
    Invalid Corps .... .... .... .... 935 .... .... 32,645
    Uniform trousers:
    Footmen 15,803 6,543 8,636 3,427 19,125 7,530 .... 337,392
    Horsemen 14,358 280 2,147 67 5,179 4,556 678 165,999
    Zouave .... .... .... .... .... .... .... 46
    Knit .... .... .... .... .... .... .... ....
    Cotton-duck trousers .... .... .... .... .... .... 67 67
    Zouave vests .... .... .... .... .... .... .... 70
    Overalls 900 .... .... .... .... .... .... 18,547
    Drawers 26,722 14,009 1,341 7,537 36,359 9,572 .... 1,337,091
    Shirts:
    Flannel 33,150 13,203 12,319 6,350 27,051 9,289 204 1,892,009
    Knit .... .... .... .... 1,815 .... 368 122,707
    Zouave .... .... .... .... .... .... .... ....
    Greatcoats:
    Footmen 7,639 5,258 10,216 3,940 10,329 3,490 190 571,037
    Horsemen 3,902 100 2,815 2,098 4,555 1,417 299 251,392
    Straps for greatcoats 11,834 550 2,752 56 5,400 2,865 1,227,210
    Blankets:
    Woolen 8,347 7,808 9,605 3,161 23,907 7,392 73 419,540
    Rubber and painted 4 6,410 5,213 4,474 321 350 616 121,691
    Ponchos 10,800 26 2 .... 10,468 548 113 172,202
    Talmas 4 .... .... .... .... .... .... 4
    Sack coats:
    Lined 19,847 6,809 5,044 3,614 12,306 846 2,270 332,903
    Unlined .... .... 3,519 3,000 .... 1,081 1,526 194,117
    Knit .... .... .... .... 85 1,966 .... 3,681
    Bootees 18,543 8,697 15,370 6,721 23,156 14,534 1,401 1,591,094
    No. 5.--Monthly statement of clothing reported on hand, &c.--Continued.
    A Louisville. D Madison. G Cairo.
    B Davenport. E Springfield. H Total on hand.
    C Chicago. F Saint Paul.

    Articles of clothing. A B C D E F G H
    Boots 16,140 744 3,173 869 5,704 1,044 372 311,460
    Leggings, zouave, &c. .... .... .... .... .... .... .... 23,452
    Stockings 77,555 12,862 15,783 7,982 32,678 14,690 153 1,374,962
    Stocks, leather 9,978 900 9,239 7,558 4,805 1,280 .... 281,539
    Uniform hats:
    Trimmed .... .... .... .... .... .... .... 42,432
    Untrimmed 9,720 3,336 12,558 .... 128 3,631 1,463 280,612
    Uniform caps .... .... .... .... .... .... .... 2,280
    Forage caps 9,186 6,681 12,204 6,707 24,250 7,210 1,528 442,636
    Zouave caps .... .... .... .... .... .... .... 4,277
    Cap covers 31,673 .... 2 .... .... .... 145 351,734
    Stable frocks 79 .... 2,998 .... 532 1,260 125 116,341
    Sashes 253 90 166 131 108 21 1 14,397
    Gloves .... .... .... .... 11,674 .... 138 12,282
    Mittens .... .... .... 5,362 20,588 2,880 .... 134,011
    Knapsacks 10,787 13,161 12,368 6,021 18,416 3,158 3,071 487,409
    Haversacks 14,568 13,300 11,559 5,258 16,625 5,092 3,974 390,529
    Canteens 17,890 10,130 12,449 4,578 16,673 2,040 130 667,716
    CONTINUED
  15. M E Wolf

    M E Wolf Brigadier General Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2008
    Messages:
    15,786
    Location:
    Virginia
    I AM ADDING THIS BECAUSE IT SHOWS THE LABOR THAT GOES INTO A QUARTERMASTER'S JOB...TO KEEP NUMBERS, ETC.
    O.R.--SERIES III--VOLUME IV [S# 125]
    CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, REPORTS, AND RETURNS OF THE UNION AUTHORITIES FROM JANUARY 1, 1864, TO APRIL 30, 1865.(*)--#37
    Monthly statement of camp and garrison equipage reported on hand at the various clothing depots for July 1, 1864.
    A New York. D Saint Louis. G Augusta.
    B Philadelphia. E Washington. H Boston.
    C Cincinnati. F Baltimore.
    Articles of equipage. A B C D E F G H
    Hospital tents 158 .... 75 1,302 234 57 .... 16
    Wall tents 5,116 1,142 1,348 806 1,365 178 .... 51
    Sibley tents .... 7 .... 114 114 31 .... 29
    Common tents 19,210 5,432 809 2,578 9,738 3,607 .... 165
    Shelter tents 20,528 78,258 .... 50,220 34,519 9,442 .... 5,474
    Fremont and Bell tents .... .... .... 43 .... .... .... 17
    Tent stoves 3,424 2,008 .... 808 1,557 304 .... 20
    Bed sacks, single 61,254 23,342 4,318 3,936 5,911 1,117 .... 997
    Bed sacks, double 15,800 38,074 681 1,954 5,988 1,104 .... 1,899
    Mosquito bars 62,106 10,062 .... 11,390 .... .... .... ....
    Regimental colors 35 1 40 32 24 24 1 11
    Camp colors 1 553 177 142 177 53 .... 124
    National colors 60 74 18 57 11 11 .... 5
    Standards 112 144 177 41 3 27 .... 1
    Storm flags 240 63 25 5 74 38 .... 27
    Garrison flags 41 85 41 23 11 17 .... 20
    Recruiting flags 812 340 410 132 2 15 .... 85
    Guidons 70 229 392 277 126 60 5 27
    Pickaxes 627 1,546 22,104 11,820 11,652 774 283 2,544
    Axes .... 7,143 19,983 4,839 16,837 975 129 2,223
    Spades 3,062 3,690 10,493 9,805 9,081 57 116 3,727
    Shovels 3,820 6,896 .... 2,134 11,283 62 .... ....
    Hatchets 12,997 9,278 5,018 7,579 5,080 773 30 1,642
    Mess pans 30,872 61,805 9,002 42,908 9,484 7,698 1,685 6,471
    Iron pots 578 428 .... 47 102 .... .... ....
    Camp kettles 14,298 28,080 26,896 1,238 5,862 3,180 835 638
    Bugles 304 1,724 222 1,173 288 65 .... 418
    Trumpets 544 80 488 386 189 149 .... 12
    Drums 533 1,936 725 993 .... 97 13 395
    Fifes 2,223 3,075 1,812 2,048 819 73 7 465
    General hospital flags 99 42 .... .... 35 23 .... ....
    Post and field hospital flags 174 153 .... .... 92 67 .... ....
    Ambulance flags 418 384 .... .... 217 76 .... ....
    Books:
    Company order 1,201 1,217 .... 905 392 3 37 67
    Company clothing account 1,127 2,547 .... 982 393 5 38 63
    Company descriptive 1,013 1,343 .... 1,018 418 3 38 12
    Company morning report 1,726 2,184 .... 734 408 105 38 142
    Post order 1,271 3,212 165 49 266 93 .... 41
    Post morning report 1,373 3,699 98 37 273 79 .... 46
    Post letter 1,285 3,175 165 93 353 60 .... 46
    Post guard 824 2,545 151 79 68 72 .... 48
    Regimental general order 384 133 .... 98 101 75 .... 28
    Regimental letter 212 285 .... 86 104 56 .... 17
    Regimental descriptive 37 185 .... 77 166 55 .... 18
    Articles of equipage. A B C D E F G H
    Books--Continued:
    Regimental index 85 204 138 92 138 52 .... 27
    Regimental order 89 148 .... 70 103 60 .... 18
    Target practice 1,978 230 .... .... 33 50 .... ....
    Consolidated morning report .... .... .... .... .... .... .... ....
    Inspection .... 43 .... .... .... .... .... ....
    Brigade letter 39 70 .... 7 11 .... .... ....
    Brigade letter received 40 70 .... 7 9 .... .... ....
    Brigade order 28 34 .... 7 25 .... .... ....
    Indorsement and memorandum 42 104 .... 7 .... .... .... ....
    ========================
    EXCERPT
    ========================
    Total amount of the articles of clothing and equipage, below enumerated, manufactured, purchased, &c., at the several depots of the Quartermaster's Depart-went during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1864.
    Articles of clothing. Total received. Articles of equipage. Total received.
    Uniform coats, engineers', ordnance, artillery, and infantry. 218,288 Hospital tents 9,698
    Uniform jackets, cavalry, artillery, infantry, zouave, knit, and Invalid Corps. 635,655 Wall-tents 33,164
    Uniform trousers, footmen and horsemen. 3,067,271 Common tents 135,142
    Drawers 4,761,540 Shelter tents 801,996
    Shirts, flannel and knit 4,743,603 Bed sacks, single and double 220,429
    Greatcoats, footmen and horsemen 1,485,593 Regimental colors 927
    Blankets: Camp colors 2,222
    Woolen 1,890,772 National colors 771
    Rubber and ponchos 421,433 Storm flags, garrison flags, and recruiting flags 5,613
    Sack coats, lined and unlined 2,099,684 Guidons 5,831
    Bootees 736,510 Pickaxes 63,050
    Boots 1,028,291 Axes 166,320
    Stockings 838,609 Spades 81,589
    Uniform hats, untrimmed 1,068,849 Hatchets 71,456
    Forage caps 1,124,773 Mess-pans 325,216
    Knapsacks 760,609 Camp-kettles 207,154
    Haversacks 2,045,554 Bugles 9,018
    Canteens 1,845,188 Trumpets 7,066
    Drums 13,451
    Fifes 14,830
    (AND THAT ISN'T INCLUDING ARTILLERY, CAVALRY, ADMIN. HEADQUARTERS, ETC. ) :wink:

    May want to see if the US Army Quartermaster's Museum/Office has these historical Zouave assembly of uniforms, as they would have been given the thumbs up/down by the Uniform Board.

    US Army Quartermaster Museum
    Jan 21, 2009 ... Preserving the history and traditions of the US Army's oldest logistics branch. Located at Fort Lee, Virginia.

    www.qmmuseum.lee.army.mil/ - 17k - Similar pages

    The Museum
    Airborne & Special Operations
    Quartermaster Units
    Exhibits
    Quartermaster Historical Photos
    Plan Your Visit
    Collections
    Quartermaster Distinctive Unit
    [ More results from www.qmmuseum.lee.army.mil ]

    http://www.qmmuseum.lee.army.mil/

    Now, that said --- talking about the Zouave Rifle(s); you would most likely get information about that with the QM's museum and or:

    Aberdeen Proving Grounds-Ordnance museum
    Aberdeen Proving Ground • Home
    For APG Services Information, Please visit our APG Services Site for ... Department of Defense Recommends changes at Aberdeen Proving Ground Under BRAC 2005 ...

    www.apg.army.mil/ - 40k - Similar pages

    Driving Directions
    Local Phone Directory
    Human Resources
    APG Services
    Units/Tenants
    Organization Chart
    Public Affairs Office
    APG News
    [ More results from www.apg.army.mil ]

    http://www.apg.army.mil/

    Up to you to investigate now. :wink:

    Respectfully submitted for consideration,
    M. E. Wolf
  16. Savez

    Savez Sergeant Major

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2009
    Messages:
    2,428
    Location:
    Alabama
    Thanks Mr. Wolf. Thats the kind of things I was looking for, but I wasn't just talking about Zouave regiments in particular. I'm thinking more along the lines of Confederate regiments.

    This is something that I think would be interesting. The depots in the confederacy produced shell jackets that had small differences in cut and additions say for instance the Columbus Depot jacket as opposed to a Richmond Depot Jacket. I always wondered where I could find when a particular regiment received a supply of clothing and which depot they got them from.
  17. M E Wolf

    M E Wolf Brigadier General Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2008
    Messages:
    15,786
    Location:
    Virginia
    Dear Savez;

    May want to talk to Mr. Levi at this site:
    AzRA Historical Resources
    US History, Civil War Uniforms, Victorian Clothing, Quartermaster Shop, Props, Re ... dba AzRA Historical Resources and Pair-O-Dice Mercantile at www. .... Civil War Uniforms Confederate (CS), American Civil War Uniforms Union (US), ...

    www.ushist.com/ - 34k - Similar pages

    http://www.ushist.com/

    He loves military clothing history and can tell you a volume full of information and is very 'detailed' ...picky picky (In a good way). He also has uniforms for sale/custom made for sale and is a re-enactor also.

    Now... for 'Bama history, may I recommend looking into this site please?:

    [PDF]Alabama Department of Archives and History Museu...
    reference to the history and resources of the state.” The collecting of artifacts ... Civil War (Confederate uniforms, flags, weapons and accoutrements) ...

    www.archives.state.al.us/scope_of_collections2.pdf - Similar pages

    http://www.archives.state.al.us/scope_of_collections2.pdf

    and, as an alternative:

    Virginia Historical Society - The Center for Virginia Histor...
    Founded in 1831, the Virginia Historical Society collects, preserves, and interprets the commonwealth's past for the education and enjoyment of present and ...

    www.vahistorical.org/ - 7k - Similar pages

    Search the Collections at the
    Contact us
    Research
    Exhibitions
    Visit the VHS
    News and Events
    About the VHS
    Publications
    [ More results from www.vahistorical.org ]

    http://www.vahistorical.org/
    Research at the Virginia Historical Society
    This page features a list of services and research guides concerning museum, library, manuscript, and photograph collections.

    www.vahistorical.org/research/main.htm - 11k - Similar pages

    http://www.vahistorical.org/research/main.htm
    Search the Collections at the Virginia Historical Society
    This page features a link to the online catalog, searching the museum, library, manuscript, and photograph collections.

    vhs3.vahistorical.org/star/x.starmarc.html - 6k - Similar pages

    http://vhs3.vahistorical.org/star/x.starmarc.html


    Respectfully submitted for consideration,
    M. E. Wolf
  18. johan_steele

    johan_steele Lt. Colonel Retired Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2005
    Messages:
    11,433
    Location:
    South of the North 40
    Savez, in particular you are going to want to find Arms and Military Equipage by Frederick Todd. Especially as there is a section on Alabama and Alabamas arms and equipment is quite well documentened. While I was TDY at Maxwell AFB back in the 90's I did some research at the Hysterical society searching for info on the 4th AL in particular and was able to garner a lot of information. Alabama has a huge amount of data on their men in the CW. It takes time and a lot of patience but real headway can be made. IMO Alabama and NC are two of the better recorded states of the CS available to us... at least in my experiance.

    Good Luck
  19. johan_steele

    johan_steele Lt. Colonel Retired Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2005
    Messages:
    11,433
    Location:
    South of the North 40
    Todd, Frederick P., American Military Equipage 1850-1872 vol 2, Company of Military Historians, 1977.
    Todd, Frederick P., American Military Equipage 1850-1872 vol 3, Company of Military Historians, 1977.

(Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)

Share This Page