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116th Ohio soldier

Discussion in 'Researching Your Civil War Ancestry' started by doug rooney, Sep 20, 2009.

  1. doug rooney

    doug rooney Private

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    I mentioned to my neighbor that I had found this site. He does not do computers (yet) and was wondering if anyone would have any information on his Great Grandfather.
    He was: Joseph Wolf Hill (I assume a private)
    Company A
    116th Ohio
    Thank you, Doug
     

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  3. captainrlm

    captainrlm Cadet

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    Use this link to get information on his unit.

    It did list his name as part of the unit so that's a good start (and it did list him as a private both coming into service and leaving it)

    http://www.itd.nps.gov/cwss/soldiers.cfm

    You may want to check local historical socieites for any marriage records, death notices or local public libraries that might have newspapers with his obituary.
     
  4. doug rooney

    doug rooney Private

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    Thanks Captain. I put his name in but couldn't get anything to come up??
     
  5. ole

    ole Brev. Brig. Gen'l Retired Moderator

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    Hope you find what you're looking for Doug. Meanwhile, you may be the first with an antecedent in the regular army. Most members whose people were here have the VI after their ancestors' unit names. The 16th U.S. Infantry may be a first.

    Oh. And welcome aboard.

    Ole
     
  6. Bonny Blue Flag

    Bonny Blue Flag 2nd Lieutenant

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    Here is a list of places to look that may help guide you on your friend's quest. Some items are general in nature with only a comment or two about the specific company.

    I have found these types of sources can provide the guidelines or bounderies, if you will, in chronology, location and participants to help in verifying info found in other sources.

    Look at Ohiocivilwar.com. specifically 116th Ohio Infantry, Compiled by Larry Stevens. There is a listing of companies by counties, history of the Ohio infantry, unit bibliographies, paintings and a photo. Most importantly, it lists the source materials, which would give you a goldmine of places to look.

    Also look at the local newspapers from the time period.

    Each state has an Historical Society, and universities may have records on battles with names, locations, etc.

    Findagrave.com is great resource.

    --BBF
     
  7. M E Wolf

    M E Wolf Brigadier General Moderator

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    Dyer's Compendium, Pt. 3 (Regimental Histories)
    OHIO VOLUNTEERS.
    116th REGIMENT INFANTRY.
    Organized at Marietta and Gallipolis, Ohio, and mustered in September 18, 1862 (Cos. "F" and "K" mustered in October 28, 1861, and joined Regiment at Buckhannon, W. Va.). Left State for Parkersburg, W. Va., October 16; thence moved to Clarksburg and Buckhannon. Moved to New Creek November 9, and to Moorefield December 12. Attached to Railroad Division, West Virginia, to January, 1863. Romney, W. Va., Defenses of the Upper Potomac, 8th Army Corps, Middle Department, to March, 1863. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 8th Army Corps, Middle Department, to June, 1863. 1st Brigade, Elliott's Command, 8th Army Corps, to July, 1863. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, Dept. of the Susquehanna, July, 1863. McReynolds' Command, Martinsburg, W. Va., Dept. of West Virginia, to December, 1863. 1st Brigade, 1st Division, West Virginia, to April, 1864. 1st Brigade. 1st Infantry Division, West Virginia, to December, 1864. 1st Brigade, Independent Division, 24th Army Corps, Army of the James, to June, 1865.

    SERVICE.--Duty at Moorefield, W. Va., December 15, 1862, to January 10, 1863. Moorefield January 3. At Romney till March 17. Near Romney February 16. At Winchester, Va., till June. Operations in Shenandoah Valley April 20-29. Scout toward Wardensville and Strasburg April 20. Scout to Strasburg April 25-29. Bunker Hill June 13 (Cos. "A" and "I"). Battle of Winchester June 13-15. Retreat to Harper's Ferry, W. Va., June 15-16; thence to Washington, D.C., July 1-4, and Join Army of the Potomac at Frederick, Md., July 5. Pursuit of Lee to Manassas Gap, Va., July 5-24. Wapping Heights, Va., July 23. At Martinsburg, W. Va., August 4, 1863, to April 29, 1864. Skirmish at Hedgesville October 16, 1863 (Detachment). Sigel's Expedition from Martinsburg to New Market April 29-May 16, 1864. Battle of New Market May 15. Advance on Staunton May 24-June 6. Piedmont June 5. Occupation of Staunton June 6. Hunter's raid on Lynchburg June 10-July 1. Lynchburg June 17-18. Ordered to the Shenandoah Valley July. Battle of Kernstown-Winchester, July 24. Sheridan's Shenandoah Valley Campaign August 7-November 28. Charlestown August 21, 22 and 29. Berryville September 3, Battle of Winchester, Opaquan Creek September 19. Fisher's Hill September 22. Cedar Creek October 13, Battle of Cedar Creek October 19. Duty at Opequan Crossing November 18 to December 19. Moved to Washington, D.C., December 19; thence to Aiken's Landing, Va, Siege of Petersburg and Richmond December 27, 1864, to April 2, 1865. Appomattox Campaign March 28-April 9, Hatcher's Run March 29-April 1. Fall of Petersburg April 2. Pursuit of Lee April 3-9. Rice's Station April 6. Appomattox Court House April 9. Surrender of Lee and his army. Duty at Richmond, Va., till June. Mustered out June 14, 1865. Companies "F" and "K" consolidated with 62nd Ohio Infantry.
    Regiment lost during service 4 Officers and 90 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 3 Officers and 88 Enlisted men by disease. Total 185.
     
  8. M E Wolf

    M E Wolf Brigadier General Moderator

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    O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XIX/2 [S# 28]
    NOVEMBER 5-14, 1862.(*)--Operations in Augusta, Bath, and Highland Counties, Va., and Pendleton and Pocahontas Counties, W. Va.
    Report of Brig. Gen. Robert H. Milroy, U. S. Army.
    HUTTONSVILLE, VA., November 14, 1862.
    Just arrived here on my return from Monterey, Huntersville, McDowell, and Franklin. Have swept the counties of Highland, Pocahontas, Pendleton, and parts of Augusta and Bath. Captured 45 prisoners, including 3, captains and 1 lieutenant; also 75 head of cattle and 25 horses. Colonel Latham, with 500 men, still after Imboden. Balance of troops on expedition will be here this evening. The One hundred and twenty-third Ohio here. The Second and Tenth Virginia and One hundred and sixteenth Ohio and batteries at Beverly. All this country to the Shenandoah Mountains clear of rebels and guerrillas. One regiment, three companies of Mountain Rangers, and one battery will be sufficient to hold this country, from Monterey to Sutton. I can take nine regiments and two batteries to Cumberland. Shall I do so? Second Lieut. Mark Poore is acting ordnance officer for my division. Clear, pleasant day here.
    R. H. MILROY,
    Brigadier-General.
    Major-General Cox.
    ----------------
    O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXI [S# 31]
    JANUARY 2-5, 1863--Expedition to Moorefield and Petersburg, W. Va.
    O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXI [S# 31]
    JANUARY 2-5, 1863--Expedition to Moorefield and Petersburg, W. Va.
    No. 3.--Reports of Col. James Washburn, One hundred and sixteenth Ohio Infantry.
    MOOREFIELD, January 3, 1863.
    We were attacked at this place this morning. I sent my train from Petersburg to New Creek. Can you send a force out to protect the train? All the force from Petersburg are here. The probability is that a large force of the enemy are marching on this place via Petersburg.
    JAMES WASHBURN,
    Colonel, Commanding Forces.
    General KELLEY,
    Harper's Ferry.
    ------------------------------
    O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXV/1 [S# 39]
    FEBRUARY 16, 1863.--Affair near Romney, W. Va.
    Report of Col. James Washburn, One hundred and sixteenth Ohio Infantry.(*)
    HARPER'S FERRY, VA.,
    February 17, 1863--12.10 p.m.
    Following dispatch just received:
    ROMNEY, W. VA., February 17, 1863.
    It is reported that 2,000 infantry and 400 cavalry are at Moorefield. Through the negligence and carelessness of the officer in command, we had a forage train and guard captured yesterday by a body of rebel cavalry. I have officially reported to General Milroy. I have scouting parties out to learn the position of the enemy.
    JAMES WASHBURN,
    Colonel, Commanding.
    General KELLEY.
    -----------------
    O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXV/1 [S# 39]
    APRIL 22-MAY 16, 1863.--Operations in the Shenandoah Valley, Va.
    No. 5.--Itinerary of the Second Division, Eighth Army Corps, April 4-May 28.(*)
    [excerpt]
    April 22.--Brigadier-General Elliott., with One hundred and sixteenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Colonel Washburn commanding; One hundred and twenty-third Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Colonel Wilson commanding; Twelfth Pennsylvania Cavalry, Lieutenant-Colonel Moss commanding; Thirteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry, Colonel Galligher commanding, and two guns of Battery D, First [West] Virginia Artillery, went on a scout to Strasburg, with infantry and artillery, and with cavalry, beyond Woodstock.
    ---------------------

    O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXVII/2 [S# 44]
    JUNE 3-AUGUST 1, 1863.--The Gettysburg Campaign.
    No. 384.--Return of Casualties in the Union forces at Winchester, Va., June 13-15, 1863.
    O Officers. A Aggregate
    M Enlisted Men. C Captured or missing

    --Killed-- -Wounded- -----C-----
    Command. O M O M O M A

    EIGHTH ARMY CORPS.

    SECOND DIVISION.

    Maj. Gen. ROBERT H. MILROY.
    First Brigade

    Brig. Gen. WASHINGTON L. ELLIOTT.

    1st Massachusetts Artillery, Company I .... .... .... 3 1 39 43
    110th Ohio .... 4 1 50 5 205 265
    116th Ohio 1 7 1 28 8 133 178
    122d Ohio 1 7 1 24 14 366 413
    123d Ohio .... 21 4 58 21 445 549
    12th Pennsylvania Cavalry .... 4 .... 12 4 152 172
    13th Pennsylvania Cavalry .... .... .... 1 3 244 248
    5th U.S. Artillery, Battery L .... 3 .... 1 1 76 81
    Total First Brigade 2 46 7 177 57 1,660 1,949

    OFFICERS KILLED.--Capts. Edward L. Porter, Eighteenth Connecticut; Frederick H. Arckenoe, One hundred and sixteenth Ohio; Charles J. Gibeaut. One hundred and twenty-second Ohio; Lynford Troch, Sixty-seventh Pennsylvania; Wells S. Farrah, Eighty-seventh Pennsylvania; Lieuts. Thomas W. Bradley and John T. Ben Gough, Twelfth West Virginia.
     
  9. M E Wolf

    M E Wolf Brigadier General Moderator

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    Cause for records to be skewed:

    O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXVII/2 [S# 44]
    JUNE 3-AUGUST 1, 1863.--The Gettysburg Campaign.
    No. 386.--Report of Brig. Gen. Washington L. Elliott, U.S. Army, commanding First Brigade, Second Division, Eighth Army Corps, of operations June 13-15.
    About 2 a.m. on the 15th, my brigade marched in the following order: Twelfth Pennsylvania Cavalry, One hundred and twenty-third Ohio, One hundred and tenth Ohio, One hundred and twenty-second Ohio. The One hundred and sixteenth Ohio did not take the position assigned it in the column, losing the road in the dark, and falling in the rear with the Second Brigade. Proceeding about 4 miles, and at the junction of the Martinsburg and Harper's Ferry road, I found the enemy, General Rodes' division, as I learned from a prisoner taken, ready to dispute my advance. I at once formed line of battle in the following order: One hundred and tenth Ohio, One hundred and twenty-second Ohio, One hundred and twenty-third Ohio, sending my assistant adjutant-general, Captain [J. Elliott] Jacobs, to report the facts to the general commanding. I ordered an attack, hoping that I might drive the enemy back and continue my march by the left flank until the troops in rear could be brought up to support my line. This was partially successful. The One hundred and tenth Ohio drove the enemy from the caissons of a battery, but had not sufficient support to hold them against his overpowering numbers. The One hundred and twenty-third Ohio was detached from my line by the orders of the general commanding, an aide-de-camp, Captain [Zebulon] Baird, giving the order to the regiment direct. Since then I have seen nothing of the regiment. The Twelfth Pennsylvania Cavalry, as soon as fired upon, left my column without orders. I have heard that the One hundred and sixteenth Ohio and detachments from other regiments marched into Pennsylvania. The records of the command having been abandoned, and the One hundred and sixteenth Ohio, excepting 1 commissioned officer and 29 enlisted men; the One hundred and twenty-third Ohio; the Twelfth Pennsylvania Cavalry; Carlin's battery, excepting 1 lieutenant and 5 enlisted men; Battery L, Fifth U.S. Artillery, excepting 1 lieutenant and 2 men, not having joined, a complete list of killed, wounded, and missing cannot be furnished.
    The conduct of the troops was as good as could be expected against the overwhelming numbers of the enemy. When Battery L was captured, nearly every horse was killed or wounded. Prisoners were taken from several divisions of Ewell's corps of veteran troops.
    The officers of my staff rendered me every assistance. First Lieu tenant Shaw, One hundred and tenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, aide-de-camp, had his horse shot under him. First Lieut. F. A. Nims, First New York Cavalry, was probably captured.
    Annexed is the strength of my brigade present, and herewith I inclose reports of regimental commanders and Lieutenant Spooner, of Battery L, Fifth U.S. Artillery.
    I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
    W. L. ELLIOTT,
    Brigadier-General of Volunteers, Commanding
    Maj. JOHN O. CRAVENS,
    A. A. G., 2d Div., 8th Army Corps.
    [Inclosure.]
    Strength present of First Brigade, Second Division, Eighth Army Corps.
    Command. Officers. Enlistedmen.
    General staff 3 ....
    110th Ohio 19 304
    116th Ohio 1 29
    122d Ohio 15 365
    123d Ohio .... ....
    Total 38 698

    Battery D, First West Virginia Artillery. 1 5
    12th Pennsylvania Cavalry .... ....
    18th Pennsylvania Cavalry 20 301
    Brigade total 59 1,004
    Aggregate .... 1,063

    W. L. ELLIOTT,
    Brigadier-General of Volunteers, Commanding.

    [Indorsement.]
    BALTIMORE, MD., June 16, 1863.
    Respectfully submitted with the following remarks:
    I did not give the order for the One hundred and twenty-third Ohio to be detached from General Elliott on the battle-field Monday, June 15, and Captain Baird informs me that he received no such order from me; that he gave no such order to Colonel Wilson or any other officer of that regiment.
    R. H. MILROY.
    ------------------------------------------
    O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXVII/2 [S# 44]
    JUNE 3-AUGUST 1, 1863.--The Gettysburg Campaign.
    No. 388.--Report of Col. James Washburn, One hundred and sixteenth Ohio Infantry, of operations June 13-15.
    BLOODY RUN, PA.,
    June 28, 1863.
    MAJOR: In compliance with your order, requiring a report of the part taken by my command in the late battle at, and retreat from, Winchester, I have to say that on Saturday, the 13th instant, three companies of my command having been previously detached--two at Bunker Hill, under command of Maj. W. T. Morris, one (Company c) in the outer works west of the main fort, and one company on picket in the star fort and on the Pughtown road--the balance of my command was detailed to work on the fortifications, which duty they performed until noon, when they returned to camp. Immediately upon arriving at camp, three companies were ordered to reenforce Company C. of my command, then stationed in the outer works west of the main fort. The three companies were sent as ordered, under command of Lieut. Col. Thomas F. Wildes. The three remaining companies were left in camp until 11 p.m., when I was ordered to proceed with my command to relieve the One hundred and twenty-third Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, then holding the Strasburg road. My command having been so reduced by detachments and details, I applied to the general commanding our brigade to ascertain whether I should take my three companies (all I had that were not on duty) to relieve an entire regiment, when I was ordered to relieve the three companies in the outer works, and then proceed forthwith to relieve the One hundred and twenty-third, as before ordered. After the necessary delay in relieving the three companies, and getting rations, I moved my command on the Pughtown road, in the direction of town. When arriving in front of the building occupied as headquarters First Brigade, I was ordered by a staff officer of the general commanding division to return with my command to camp, and from there to station it in the works west of the star fort, where I remained until the attack on the outer works.
    During the forenoon, I was re-enforced by the fragments of the two companies (A and I) that returned from Bunker Hill, under command of Major Morris, nearly one-half of each company having been either killed, wounded, or captured in the fight the evening previous. Shortly after the attack on the outer works, where Company C, of my command, was still stationed, I received an order to go to the support of the battery that was stationed in the aforesaid works. I accordingly moved my command, preceded by the Eighty-seventh Pennsylvania, toward the works, but previous to this time the enemy had carried the works and captured the battery. I still moved on with my command, and at the same time directed my adjutant to go as speedily as possible to the main fort, and ascertain from the general whether it was the order to attempt to retake the works and battery, or to fall back. My adjutant soon returned with the order to fall back. This order came just before I had got in range of the enemy's guns. My command retreated in good order, under a terrible fire of shot and shell, into the main fort, without the loss of a man. Company C, which was stationed in the outer works at the time they were carried by the enemy, suffered severely, losing its captain and several men killed, besides wounded or taken prisoners.

    The remnant of the company left fell back into the star fort, and at the time of the evacuation and retreat was with the Fifth Maryland Regiment. I have since learned unofficially that the first lieutenant and 25 men were at Harper's Ferry. The balance of the company that is left (some 20 men) are with the regiment. My command remained in the main fort until the evacuation was ordered, when I took position in the column, the third regiment from the rear.

    At the time of the attack on Monday morning, my command, together with the Twelfth West Virginia Infantry, formed a line of battle on the left of the pike, nearly opposite to the woods where the engagement commenced. Here we remained under fire for some minutes, when I was ordered to file left, and form a line of battle, and attack the enemy in the rear of the woods on the left of the pike, which I did by marching up the lane that lies to the left of the pike and runs at right angles with it. Having proceeded up this lane some distance, I filed to the right, and marched in toward the rear of the woods, as ordered. When nearing the woods, I received an order from a staff officer to fall back to the lane and make my retreat the best way possible, as the firing had nearly ceased, and to attack the enemy at that time and place would effect no good. After returning to the lane, I met a scout of the general's, who said he was acquainted with the country, and would pilot me through the mountains to the river.

    continued
     
  10. M E Wolf

    M E Wolf Brigadier General Moderator

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    After a long and fatiguing march of nearly 40 miles, at dark we bivouacked at a point about 4 miles east of Bath.

    The First New York and a part of the Twelfth Pennsylvania Cavalry were with us until afternoon, when they left us, and went directly through to Hancock the same night.

    At an early hour on Tuesday morning, I took up the line of march for the river (Potomac), which we crossed at Sir John's Run at 10 a.m., and arrived at Hancock at 2 p.m. same day.

    Here (at Hancock) I found the Twelfth West Virginia, part of the Eighty-seventh Pennsylvania, and detached companies, stragglers from every infantry regiment in the division, together with the First New York, Twelfth Pennsylvania, and Colonel Galligher, of the Thirteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry, who assumed command of all the forces then at Hancock.

    Here I remained until 10 o'clock same night, and it being rumored that the enemy was advancing upon Hancock, and also receiving intelligence that a train would be in readiness on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, at Little Orleans Station, to transport the infantry to Cumberland, the whole command, by order of Colonel Galligher, moved up the pike toward Cumberland.

    We moved during the night some 18 or 20 miles up the pike, and in the morning left the pike to the right, and took a cross-road for the Little Orleans Station. This point we reached about noon, but, greatly to the disappointment of the men, who were nearly worn out, we found no train in waiting for us.

    During the afternoon, while waiting for a train, I received a dispatch from Colonel Galligher--the cavalry having kept the pike toward Cumberland instead of following us to the station--that the enemy occupied Cumberland, and were coming down the canal and railroad in the direction of the station. I accordingly retraced my steps toward the pike, and bivouacked for the night about 1½ miles from the station.

    At 3 o'clock the next morning, we started again toward the pike, and reached it soon after sunrise. After reaching the pike, we marched up the pike about 4 miles, and then took a road over the mountains, leaving the pike to the left, and moved toward Chaneyville, which point we reached the same evening.

    Here we bivouacked for the night, and the next day (Friday, 19th instant) we reached this place (Bloody Run), and reported to General Milroy in person, who arrived here from Hopewell about the same time.

    I cannot speak too highly of the good order and discipline displayed by both officers and men during the whole affair. Especially would I commend the cheerfulness and patience with which the men endured the march of five days, averaging nearly 30 miles per day, and with scarcely one ration of food during the whole march. Neither can I forbear speaking of the brave defense of Bunker Hill by the force under Major Morris, whereby the train of the Third Brigade was saved. The forces under command of the major at Bunker Hill were one company of the First New York Cavalry, two companies of the Eighty-seventh Pennsylvania, and two companies (A and I) of my command. They met an overwhelming force of the enemy in open field. They were driven back, losing nearly one-half their men in killed, wounded, and prisoners. It was here that Captain Cochran, of Company I, received a severe wound in the right arm and was taken prisoner. After being repulsed in the open field, they fell back to the churches, which they were occupying for quarters. These, being pierced with port-holes by knocking out now and then a brick, served as a defense from the fire of the enemy, while the port-holes could be used with telling effect upon the enemy.

    Here they fought from 5 p.m. of Saturday until dark, when the rebels sent in a flag of truce demanding the surrender of the command, to which the major replied, "We are not doing that kind of business."

    Here they staid until 2 o'clock the next morning, when they evacuated their position, and fell back upon the forces at Winchester, making good their retreat.

    This report, somewhat lengthy and perhaps too much in detail, is respectfully submitted.
    JAMES WASHBURN,
    Col., Comdg. One hundred and sixteenth Regt. Ohio Vol. Inf.
    Maj. JOHN O. CRAVENS,
    A. A. G. Second Division, Eighth Army Corps.
    (just a sampler of reports of the One-hundred-sixteenth Ohio; search with unit name spelled out and 116 advised)
     
  11. doug rooney

    doug rooney Private

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    Thank you all for the responses and info on the 116th! Again, very informative. I, and my neighbor are most grateful! Regards, Doug
     

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